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NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ling Zhong's parents have come from China to watch her graduate from Swarthmore College on Sunday, and she surely wants them to understand the ceremony. So Zhong, 22, a Beijing native, and a younger classmate, also from China, will set up in a classroom on the third floor of the college's performing arts center, where they will translate the speeches into Mandarin. Zhong's parents and anyone else who cares to hear the Mandarin version can don headsets and listen at both the spacious amphitheater where the event will be held and an auditorium in the performing arts center where it will be projected onto a large screen.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Third graders Sharif Thomas and Ryan DeRock eagerly showed off their worldly skills, racing each other to count to 10 in Mandarin first. The 9-year-old boys are students at the Evergreen Avenue School, one of a handful in South Jersey that teaches Chinese as part of its standard elementary curriculum. On Tuesday, a pack of panda bears, a Kabuki opera troupe, and a grand dragon welcomed in 4700 - the Year of the Horse - at the school's Chinese New Year celebration. "It's kind of hard, but it's fun," said Sharif, whose class did a dance for the festivities.
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Imagine adopting a Chinese baby, bound to grow up as American as apple pie and the Fourth of July. How does an American parent weave at least a few threads of Chinese culture into such a child's life? The parents of about eight preschoolers, most Chinese-born, think they've found an answer in Mandarin language classes taught by two Shanghai natives in rented quarters at the United Methodist Church of Bala Cynwyd. "We're doing it because we want Sonya to be very proud of her heritage.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | By Constance Garcia-Barrio, FOR THE INQUIRER
Family members gave a collective gasp when I put the question to my son, Manuel, then 22, and my nephew Blake, 15, at Christmas dinner. "How about the three of us going to China in the summer?" The boys looked at each other, then back at me. Despite doubtful faces around them, they both said, "Cool! Let's do it!" Blake, then a ninth grader at the St. Alban's School in Washington, would have a year of Mandarin under his belt by June. "I'd been studying the language," he told me later, "and I was curious about the culture.
NEWS
October 31, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a push to prepare students for the ever-changing global marketplace, the Philadelphia School District is expanding classes in Mandarin Chinese - the most prevalent language in the world, yet largely neglected by the nation's schools until the last few years. More than 1,700 students are taking Chinese this year at six district high schools and three elementary schools - up from 900 two years ago. Now Paul Vallas, the school district's chief executive officer, wants to double that number.
NEWS
May 12, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One day, 10-year-old Jamal Badie may want to be an astronaut. "You get to float around, and you get to see stuff you never saw before," the fourth grader at Evergreen Avenue Elementary School said wistfully. His signature will at least make it into orbit. Jamal's class launched the school's participation in "Student Signatures in Space," the highlight of a national education program to get students interested in outer space. Students from 530 U.S. schools - including Thomas E. Bowe Elementary School in Glassboro, Whitehall Elementary School in Williamstown, Thomas O. Hopkins Middle School in Burlington Township, Kenneth R. Olson Middle School in Tabernacle, Delran Middle School, and St. John's School in Collingswood - signed and decorated posters that will travel aboard a space-shuttle mission in the fall.
FOOD
August 19, 1992 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Lipton Iced Tea Mixes. Lemon-lime with sugar, mandarin orange sugar free, and citrus with sugar. $2.99 to $3.29 per 32-ounce canister or 2.8-ounce jar of mandarin orange yielding 10 quarts. Bonnie: In reaction to America's new love affair with fruit-flavored drinks, Lipton has introduced three new instant iced teas with fruit flavorings. All three are made from dehydrated tea, just like Lipton's other instant teas. In addition to the tea, the new lemon-lime and citrus flavors contain flavorings and sugar; the mandarin orange contains flavorings and NutraSweet instead of sugar.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"IRON MAN 3" is good fun, and the story of how the franchise got its groove back is one of those strange only-in-Hollywood tales. Cut to 2004, when fallen star Robert Downey Jr. was trying to mount a movie comeback after rehab and exile - a history of arrests and relapse had made him uninsurable and nearly unemployable. Producers withheld salary until wrap day; friends paid his insurance bond. He was offered the lead in an offbeat mystery-comedy called "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" and took it, and while the movie didn't make much money, it reaffirmed Downey's chops - his speed-bag way with dialogue, his gift for blink-of-an-eye shifts from comedy to drama.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | John Timpane
Maps What are maps after all but metaphors for what we don't know? At each juncture of the human record of perception of where we are we see a little of the near at hand but want to know what's over the rise in the hill or the far horizon at sea. Copernicus & Kepler gave us the first big reorientation Darwin & Wallace a new...
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A pack of Chinese lions and a tinseled dragon descended on the Evergreen Avenue School, scaring up a good time for first graders and parents attending a performance in celebration of the Chinese New Year. Dressed in colorful costumes, more than a dozen pupils danced, sang traditional songs, and recited poems, and did it entirely in Chinese, Mandarin to be exact. The performance was part of an effort by school officials to teach the children Mandarin and promote a deeper understanding of Chinese culture.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ling Zhong's parents have come from China to watch her graduate from Swarthmore College on Sunday, and she surely wants them to understand the ceremony. So Zhong, 22, a Beijing native, and a younger classmate, also from China, will set up in a classroom on the third floor of the college's performing arts center, where they will translate the speeches into Mandarin. Zhong's parents and anyone else who cares to hear the Mandarin version can don headsets and listen at both the spacious amphitheater where the event will be held and an auditorium in the performing arts center where it will be projected onto a large screen.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"IRON MAN 3" is good fun, and the story of how the franchise got its groove back is one of those strange only-in-Hollywood tales. Cut to 2004, when fallen star Robert Downey Jr. was trying to mount a movie comeback after rehab and exile - a history of arrests and relapse had made him uninsurable and nearly unemployable. Producers withheld salary until wrap day; friends paid his insurance bond. He was offered the lead in an offbeat mystery-comedy called "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" and took it, and while the movie didn't make much money, it reaffirmed Downey's chops - his speed-bag way with dialogue, his gift for blink-of-an-eye shifts from comedy to drama.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | John Timpane
Maps What are maps after all but metaphors for what we don't know? At each juncture of the human record of perception of where we are we see a little of the near at hand but want to know what's over the rise in the hill or the far horizon at sea. Copernicus & Kepler gave us the first big reorientation Darwin & Wallace a new...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It seems that duck tongue is every Chinatown foodie's double-dare dish these days. Its mere presence has become a sort of hallmark of authenticity in the neighborhood's new guard of regional-minded restaurants. This is one delicacy, however, that I clearly wasn't meant to savor. It's not that I'm unadventurous. And I believe Sakura Mandarin owner Jack Chen when he says that nothing evokes a Shanghai snack quite like munching the wine-poached taste buds off those bony little cluckers.
NEWS
February 1, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Set in a beguiling Hello Kitty visual style, Ni Hao, Kai-Lan is a welcome addition to Nick Jr.'s preschool cartoon lineup (weekdays, 11 a.m.). In the same way that Dora the Explorer introduces young viewers to Spanish phrases, Ni Hao, Kai-Lan is a painless primer on the rudiments of spoken Mandarin. The lessons begin with the title. Ni Hao means "hello" and Kai-Lan is a cheerful, active, bilingual moppet, 5 3/4 years old. Fittingly, the show debuts on Thursday, the first day of the Chinese New Year.
NEWS
October 31, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a push to prepare students for the ever-changing global marketplace, the Philadelphia School District is expanding classes in Mandarin Chinese - the most prevalent language in the world, yet largely neglected by the nation's schools until the last few years. More than 1,700 students are taking Chinese this year at six district high schools and three elementary schools - up from 900 two years ago. Now Paul Vallas, the school district's chief executive officer, wants to double that number.
NEWS
March 2, 2005 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chalk it up to a quirky coincidence: A man who appeared in Chester County Court to avoid getting penalty points on his driving record yesterday ended up scoring brownie points with the judge. Zhengtian Xu, 41, of West Chester, was sitting in Judge Anthony A. Sarcione's courtroom to appeal a speeding ticket when he volunteered to help in the plight of Li Qin Zhang. Zhang, 46, had traveled from California to appeal citations he had received when passing through Parkesburg. He was accused of lacking proper paperwork for his 18-wheel truck.
SPORTS
January 29, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chad Lewis is the one Eagles player still preparing for Sunday's Super Bowl at Reliant Stadium. In fact, the veteran tight end might be working harder now than if the Eagles had beaten the Carolina Panthers and advanced to the NFL title game against the New England Patriots. That's because his job Sunday will be to provide color commentary to China Central Television. "When we lost the game, I thought I was going to be doing the on-field reporting," Lewis said yesterday from his home in Las Vegas.
NEWS
May 12, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One day, 10-year-old Jamal Badie may want to be an astronaut. "You get to float around, and you get to see stuff you never saw before," the fourth grader at Evergreen Avenue Elementary School said wistfully. His signature will at least make it into orbit. Jamal's class launched the school's participation in "Student Signatures in Space," the highlight of a national education program to get students interested in outer space. Students from 530 U.S. schools - including Thomas E. Bowe Elementary School in Glassboro, Whitehall Elementary School in Williamstown, Thomas O. Hopkins Middle School in Burlington Township, Kenneth R. Olson Middle School in Tabernacle, Delran Middle School, and St. John's School in Collingswood - signed and decorated posters that will travel aboard a space-shuttle mission in the fall.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Third graders Sharif Thomas and Ryan DeRock eagerly showed off their worldly skills, racing each other to count to 10 in Mandarin first. The 9-year-old boys are students at the Evergreen Avenue School, one of a handful in South Jersey that teaches Chinese as part of its standard elementary curriculum. On Tuesday, a pack of panda bears, a Kabuki opera troupe, and a grand dragon welcomed in 4700 - the Year of the Horse - at the school's Chinese New Year celebration. "It's kind of hard, but it's fun," said Sharif, whose class did a dance for the festivities.
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