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Manhattan Project

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NEWS
May 24, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Herbert B. Callen, an Olney native who worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II and retired from the University of Pennsylvania as emeritus professor of physics, died Saturday at his daughter's home in Merion. He was 73. With the help of Sara, his wife of 48 years, Mr. Callen had battled Alzheimer's disease for the last 11 years, his daughter, Jill Bressler, said yesterday. Mr. Callen, whose fluctuation dissipation theorem helped physicists understand how electricity flows, earned a doctorate in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1947 and joined the Penn faculty in 1948.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"The Manhattan Project. " A drama starring John Lithgow, Christopher Collet, Cynthia Nixon and Jill Eikenberry. Directed by Marshall Brickman from a screenplay by Thomas Baum and Brickman. Photographed by Billy Williams. Edited by Nina Feinborg. Music by Philippe Sarde. Running time: 117 minutes. A 20th Century-Fox release. In area theaters. Twentieth Century-Fox certainly isn't wasting any time. Following quickly on the heels of the studio's "Spacecamp" is Marshall Brickman's "The Manhattan Project," another science-fact drama about unusually studious and responsible youths who prove themselves to an adult world of scientists and bureaucrats.
NEWS
August 28, 2000
Hermann Lisco, a gifted scientist and legendary teacher, died last week. He was a quiet man from an unquiet place. German-born, he received his medical degree from the University of Berlin in 1936, came to the United States to teach pathology at Johns Hopkins University, and was recruited to the Manhattan Project. In secret, he worked with a team of scientists at the University of Chicago studying the biological effects of a strange new human creation: plutonium. Later, he was flown to Los Alamos to study the first person ever to be killed by acute radiation poisoning.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Last summer was cratered with several movie bombs that shared the theme of teenagers meddling with science and risking various catastrophes. Marshall Brickman's The Manhattan Project shows what can be done with the same idea when the bombs are all too real. Brickman, a sometime colleague of Woody Allen (they shared the best- screenplay Oscar for Annie Hall) has come up with several surprises. Not the least of them is that a filmmaker known chiefly for the drolleries of Simon and Lovesick should show such command and assurance on what is alien turf for him. Brickman isn't a high technologist in the manner of John Badham, who did the paranoid fantasies WarGames and Blue Thunder in 1983.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Robert F. Christy, 96, a former California Institute of Technology professor who helped design the trigger mechanism for the atomic bombs used in World War II, died of natural causes Wednesday at his home in Pasadena, Calif., according to Caltech spokeswoman Deborah Williams-Hedges. Mr. Christy was one of the early recruits to the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos Laboratory, a U.S. government research project to develop atomic weapons during the war. He was handpicked to join by his University of California, Berkeley, professor J. Robert Oppenheimer, with whom Mr. Christy studied quantum mechanics.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As with many husbands on Thanksgiving, Daniel D. Friel Sr. was asked by his wife to carve the big turkey. But when the soon-to-retire DuPont Co. executive tried to find a knife with a decent edge, he came up empty. "He attempted to sharpen them with what tools he had, and he found they didn't work. He basically made a mess of the turkey," Mr. Friel's son, Daniel Jr., said. That experience led Mr. Friel Sr. to his life's Act II: founding EdgeCraft Corporation in Avondale, Pa., and developing the popular Chef'sChoice® line of culinary tools, including knife sharpeners, food slicers, and waffle makers.
NEWS
May 21, 1993 | By DANIEL S. GREENBERG
Down goes Star Wars, while the Space Station shrinks toward oblivion, and the super atom smasher in Texas faces formidable money problems. Times are bad for these and other so-called mega-projects, America's unique invention for the advancement of science and technology in space and on earth. Along with their mammoth scale, the mega-projects share a common political trajectory of strong commitment at the outset, rising budgets in the billions, disillusionment, and decline. Once considered a virtue in high-tech endeavors, bigness itself has become a ground for suspicion whenever scientists or engineers aspire to grand creations.
NEWS
March 1, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William J. Prichard, 90, of West Brandywine and Havertown, a research chemist who worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II and an avid photographer, died Feb. 21 at Brandywine Hospital of heart arrhythmia. A resident of Freedom Village retirement community in West Brandywine, Mr. Prichard lived in Havertown for most of his life and spent his happiest hours sailing on the Chesapeake Bay or using his chemical knowledge in the darkroom, experimenting with unusual techniques in printing black-and white photographs.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert R. Jones Sr., 93, formerly of Warminster, a statistician who worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II, died of Alzheimer's disease Saturday, Nov. 16, at Southampton Estates. Mr. Jones was among the specialists and scientists who worked in secret to build the atomic bomb during World War II, he told the Hatboro Public Spirit in a 2004 interview. Equipped with a bachelor's degree from Columbia University in statistics but unfit for military service due to a punctured eardrum, he initially went to work for the DuPont Co. in Connecticut.
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NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert R. Jones Sr., 93, formerly of Warminster, a statistician who worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II, died of Alzheimer's disease Saturday, Nov. 16, at Southampton Estates. Mr. Jones was among the specialists and scientists who worked in secret to build the atomic bomb during World War II, he told the Hatboro Public Spirit in a 2004 interview. Equipped with a bachelor's degree from Columbia University in statistics but unfit for military service due to a punctured eardrum, he initially went to work for the DuPont Co. in Connecticut.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Robert F. Christy, 96, a former California Institute of Technology professor who helped design the trigger mechanism for the atomic bombs used in World War II, died of natural causes Wednesday at his home in Pasadena, Calif., according to Caltech spokeswoman Deborah Williams-Hedges. Mr. Christy was one of the early recruits to the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos Laboratory, a U.S. government research project to develop atomic weapons during the war. He was handpicked to join by his University of California, Berkeley, professor J. Robert Oppenheimer, with whom Mr. Christy studied quantum mechanics.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As with many husbands on Thanksgiving, Daniel D. Friel Sr. was asked by his wife to carve the big turkey. But when the soon-to-retire DuPont Co. executive tried to find a knife with a decent edge, he came up empty. "He attempted to sharpen them with what tools he had, and he found they didn't work. He basically made a mess of the turkey," Mr. Friel's son, Daniel Jr., said. That experience led Mr. Friel Sr. to his life's Act II: founding EdgeCraft Corporation in Avondale, Pa., and developing the popular Chef'sChoice® line of culinary tools, including knife sharpeners, food slicers, and waffle makers.
NEWS
October 16, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Few major modern operas enter the world with so little critical consensus as Doctor Atomic. Embraced and dismissed but not for consistent reasons, John Adams' opera about the invention of the atomic bomb made the rounds in San Francisco, Chicago, Amsterdam, but arrived at the Metropolitan Opera on Monday with a twist. Instead of the original Peter Sellars production, British filmmaker Penny Woolcock (whose movie version of Adams' The Death of Klinghoffer is maybe the best-ever opera film)
NEWS
March 1, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William J. Prichard, 90, of West Brandywine and Havertown, a research chemist who worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II and an avid photographer, died Feb. 21 at Brandywine Hospital of heart arrhythmia. A resident of Freedom Village retirement community in West Brandywine, Mr. Prichard lived in Havertown for most of his life and spent his happiest hours sailing on the Chesapeake Bay or using his chemical knowledge in the darkroom, experimenting with unusual techniques in printing black-and white photographs.
NEWS
August 28, 2000
Hermann Lisco, a gifted scientist and legendary teacher, died last week. He was a quiet man from an unquiet place. German-born, he received his medical degree from the University of Berlin in 1936, came to the United States to teach pathology at Johns Hopkins University, and was recruited to the Manhattan Project. In secret, he worked with a team of scientists at the University of Chicago studying the biological effects of a strange new human creation: plutonium. Later, he was flown to Los Alamos to study the first person ever to be killed by acute radiation poisoning.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | by Ian Abrams
Two things came together in the last few days to make me think that the world is less predictable - and less threatening - than it might seem. I've been teaching part of a course called the Drexel Symposium in which we look at a single subject from a variety of perspectives. Our topic this term was the atomic bomb. We've been bringing in guest lecturers to talk about nuclear weapons from their particular vantage points - physics, engineering, history, even myth and legend.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the early 1940s, the company Harold Pugh worked for became involved in a top-secret project involving a large power plant in Washington state. Pugh didn't know exactly what the project was, only that it had the highest security classification. As it turned out, his employer - the Darby-based Roberts Filter Group - had contracted to supply all the water-filtration systems for the Manhattan Project, which had facilities around the country. Only after the United States dropped the world's first atomic bomb on Japan in 1945 did Pugh find out what was going on. "You ought to see the letters we got," Pugh, 85, said last week as he made a leisurely recovery from a party the day before.
NEWS
February 26, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
George J. Nessle, 74, formerly of Montgomery County, a retired chemist who worked on the World War II Manhattan Project to develop the atomic bomb, died Feb. 16 at his home in St. Petersburg Beach, Fla. Mr. Nessle was born in Corning, N.Y., and graduated from Corning Free Academy High School in 1939. He earned a degree in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1943. From May 1943 to June 1944, he worked for Corning Glass Works in development and manufacture of the Norden Bomb Sight, a device that greatly increased the accuracy of Allied bombing of Germany.
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