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Manhood

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NEWS
February 20, 1990 | By RICHARD G. MALLOY, S.J
Orlando and his companera, Santa, come to Holy Name Rectory in Camden seeking baptism for their child, Felicita, a bubbly, round little bundle of a baby, almost one year old. Orlando reminisces about his days here at Holy Name and assures me he's going to start attending Mass again, that he misses God in his life. He asks for some holy water to take home. Ten days later, Orlando and his brother Tino are tortured, repeatedly stabbed (the wounds are stuffed with 20 dollar bills), and shot thru the mouth.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | By Don Belton
As Louis Farrakhan's million marchers throng Washington today, I inevitably think of the massive 1963 march led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. That march crystallized dignity and struggle for our entire nation and the world, and it cannot be duplicated. But, after so many other Washington marches in the three decades since, the Dr. King-led march has become like an old rhythm and blues song that has been "covered" so many times that the force of the original performance has become lost to an entire generation.
NEWS
May 17, 2007 | By Karen J. Hamilton
In most cultures of the world, celebrations mark the passage of a boy from childhood into manhood. It is usually a time of affirmation, increased privilege and great joy. Why, then, do I feel such anxiety, concern and sadness for my own son's entrance into manhood? James is a 15-year-old honor student at one of the city's best public high schools. He is a caring, pleasant child, the oldest of four children, who loves playing basketball, eating fried chicken and fidgeting around with the latest technology.
NEWS
September 30, 1991 | By Phyllis Theroux, From the New York Times
Today, after a scheduled court hearing, we may know whether eight worried alumni of the Skull and Bones Society, the all-male secret club at Yale, succeeded in winning a permanent injunction blocking the admission of six women recruited by student members. A lawyer for the plaintiffs, who include William F. Buckley, Jr., complained that "the rituals, secrecy and confidentiality," which he called "powerful attractions," would be "lost forever. " Is this a confirmation of what the poet Robert Bly has been preaching in his best-selling book "Iron John"?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A version of this review appeared when "Mister Foe" was presented at the Philadelphia International Film Festival in April. 'I like creepy guys," confesses Kate Breck (Sophia Myles) in a bar, one too many drinks in her belly and her brain, to the young lad named Hallam Foe (Jamie Bell). In Mister Foe - a pervy and poignant tale of a boy on the brink of manhood, still reeling from the death of his mother - the late-20s Kate and the just-18 Hallam tumble into a strange romance. How strange?
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fourteen-year-old Derrick Stinson stood on a stage yesterday to tell a crowd what he had learned about manhood. "I learned that a boy does what he wants to and a man does what he has to do," said Stinson, a seventh grader at Woodrow Wilson Middle School in the Northeast. Stinson, of Logan, was among six young males "initiated" into manhood during the 10th annual Father's Day Picnic, sponsored by the Father's Day Rally Committee, an organization led by local African American men. About 100 people attended the event, held behind Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park.
NEWS
October 19, 1998 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Muhammad Warith laid out the ground rules. "Obey the instructors" and "stick with the group" were on his list of demands. But then, the bass in his voice deepened, the skin between his eyebrows crinkled, and he pointed an index finger at the 12 or so boys who attended the fourth annual Father/Son Sleep-In at the borough community center's gymnasium. And everyone knew the last two rules would be the most important: "There will be absolutely no fighting and no arguing. If you have a conflict, resolve it or see one of us so that we can help you resolve it," he said.
NEWS
January 23, 2002 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
The Rev. Lamont McLean is one of the most potent local pastors you've probably never heard of. Off the public's radar, the evangelical entrepreneur has raised from scratch a booming Pentecostal church in Cherry Hill called Living Faith Christian Center. He also chairs a $20 million computer business and has branched out as a regional televangelist, buying a half-hour slot Sunday evenings on Channel 48. His born-again flock of 3,000 adores him as "our man of God. " They give him standing ovations when he rises to deliver one of his long, spellbinding preaching-teachings on "biblical living" at the church's five weekly services.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By Arlene Martin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The dreams and aspirations of boyhood can lead to success and achievement in manhood. That's one observation that Daniel Hart makes in his new book, Becoming Men: The Development of Aspirations, Values, and Adaptational Styles, which sifts through the complex passage from youth to manhood. Hart, 36, an associate professor in psychology at Rutgers University since 1984, has been intrigued with the stages of human development since his days as an undergraduate at Bates College in Maine.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | by Anderson Jones, Daily News Staff Writer
Naim Muslim fathered two children before he turned 20, more than 20 years ago. But, he says, with a laugh, "with my behavior then, I had the potential to have many more. " Now 40, Muslim formed the Camden-based organization Fathers Go Get Your Sons three years ago to inspire fathers young and old to do just that. The organization concentrates especially on teen dads. He says the idea came to him more or less like a vision. "It was an inspiration," Muslim says, "a result of all the talents and skills that I have.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | Annette John-Hall
I can't think of anybody better equipped to run a male parenting program than Joel Austin, the president and CEO of Daddy UniverseCity Inc. You know how they tell writers to write what they know? Well, Austin runs what he knows. He knows the rock-bottom feeling of county sheriffs rousting him out of bed at 5 in the morning, cuffing and shackling him, and hauling him to jail for falling behind on his child-support payments — all while his three terrified sons watched from the next room.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Stephanie Farr and Daily News Staff Writer
BELIEVING he was handling an unloaded gun, an 18-year-old accidentally shot himself in the head during a webcam chat early Wednesday when the person on the other end of the conversation challenged the teen's manhood, police said.   To make matters worse, the teen's two brothers — one of whom is just 13 — were in the room when the shooting occurred, said East Detectives Capt. John Gallagher. As of Wednesday night, the teen, whom police did not identify, was brain-dead and in extremely critical condition at Temple University Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2011 | By Cary Darling, McClatchy Newspapers
So just who is this Chris Lilley anyway? That's the question many American viewers are going to be asking, for better and for worse, with the premiere of the 12-episode miniseries Angry Boys. The talented Melbourne comedian/ actor/ writer/ director's latest project gets a prime HBO slot beginning Sunday. Lilley has made waves before with We Can Be Heroes (a.k.a. The Nominees when it was shown on the Sundance Channel) and the wickedly smart Summer Heights High, semi-improvised mockumentaries about Australian life, in which he played the three main characters, effortlessly disappearing into the skin of a tough Tongan kid and an airhead teenage girl, to name just two. The performer is working on his biggest video canvas yet with Angry Boys, a comedic meditation on testosterone and manhood filmed in three countries (Australia, Japan, the United States)
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Marc Lamont Hill, Daily News Columnist
EARLIER THIS week, a 10-second video clip sparked a huge controversy on the Internet. The video, recorded earlier this month, showed Toronto Raptors guard Leandro Barbosa grabbing the hand of teammate Reggie Evans as they walked to the locker room after a victory over the Orlando Magic. The public response reveals the ridiculous contradictions within our culture regarding "appropriate" male behavior. After all, the same folk who are weirded out by the sight of two men holding hands see nothing wrong with the plentiful array of hugs, ass smacks and chest bumps that comprise any professional or neighborhood basketball, football, hockey or baseball game.
NEWS
November 29, 2009 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forty-three minutes past midnight, a crackle pierced the summer air. For a moment, Leroy Lewis, perched on a concrete wall beside a rowhouse in his Juniata Park neighborhood, talking to two friends, dismissed the sound as leftover fireworks. When Lewis, 19, turned to look, he saw a young man, his baseball cap tilted low, moving from the alleyway across the narrow street, pointing a gun, hunting. "The next shot was me looking at him," Lewis recounted later. "I just seen a whole bunch of fire.
NEWS
November 2, 2009 | By A.J. THOMSON
LIFE IN America in the 21st century affords everyone the opportunity to be a hypocrite, especially in the environmental sphere. It also affords some greener-than-thou goofball the opportunity to point out your flaws, though those green-jeans folks usually have flaws of their own. (For every bit of recycling you do, you're no doubt violating some other carbon-offset credo by breathing too much.) As insufferable as the green crowd can be, and I know because I sometimes flash my membership card and correct people for their environmental slights while ignoring some of my own, we're light-years ahead of the dopes who are committed to nonsensical waste.
NEWS
August 15, 2009
AS A HUSBAND and father, my family is my most prized possession. It's my job to love them, protect them, provide for them and, most of all, present them with a living portrait of manhood. That's why it struck a chord with me when I watched the news conference announcing that Michael Vick - who served 18 months in prison for bankrolling a dogfighting ring - had been signed by the Eagles. Amid everything Vick said about contrition and redemption, one thing stood out for me as a father.
NEWS
May 18, 2009 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Good things can indeed come in small packages, as dancer-choreographer Shavon Norris proved when she unwrapped two small, power-packed works at the Community Education Center over the weekend. To open, she danced her 2007 solo Said, a remembrance of things said to her as a child. In a pool of warm light, her movements began small - hips, then shoulders, then arms flying out - and gradually enlarged until she was moving full out across the floor. Norris, a CEC resident artist this year, wore a simple peach frock and cornrowed hair that gave her a little-girl look.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A version of this review appeared when "Mister Foe" was presented at the Philadelphia International Film Festival in April. 'I like creepy guys," confesses Kate Breck (Sophia Myles) in a bar, one too many drinks in her belly and her brain, to the young lad named Hallam Foe (Jamie Bell). In Mister Foe - a pervy and poignant tale of a boy on the brink of manhood, still reeling from the death of his mother - the late-20s Kate and the just-18 Hallam tumble into a strange romance. How strange?
LIVING
February 17, 2008 | Reviewed by Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hoops By Major Jackson Norton. 125 pp. $14.95 For many world-traveled Philadelphians, all roads lead back to this beloved, red-brick city, its sights, smells and culture. Such apparently is the case for poet Major Jackson. In Hoops, his latest book, the Temple University graduate and product of the Philadelphia public schools conjures nuances of urban life, especially in his native North Philadelphia, in engaging poems. In telling stories, Jackson references many familiar places and situations, among them his childhood in an often tense and polarized city and his perilous journey from black youth to manhood.
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