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Manic Depression

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NEWS
April 6, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
People who suffer the mood swings of manic-depression may be helped by an anti-epilepsy drug. Researchers at the University of Texas say the divalproex sodium is the first effective treatment for manic-depression's "up" side. Manic-depressives suffer mood swings that vary from extreme depression to euphoric elation. The euphoria causes temperamental outbursts, delusions, hypersexuality and insomnia. Led by Dr. Charles Bowden, head of biological psychiatry at the university's Health Science Center in San Antonio, researchers found divalproex sodium helped 48 percent of the manic-depressives who received it during testing.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Relatives of Markeis Baylor, the young man who killed two older people who loved him and later turned the shotgun on himself, have told authorities that the troubled teenager suffered from manic depression. The revelation could help explain the three deaths that have been attributed to Baylor, 19. Early Thursday, Baylor killed Lillian and James Wilson, the Cheltenham couple he called his grandparents. He then took James Wilson's blue van to Philadelphia International Airport, where he had a shootout with a city police officer and then killed himself.
NEWS
September 7, 1994 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 47-year-old Vietnam veteran who fantasized about the war as he used his farmhouse as a bunker, holding police at bay for 30 hours with a shotgun last summer, was sentenced yesterday to five years in the Bucks County Correctional Facility. George Pieczynski had been facing up to 20 years in a state penitentiary for firing at police officers during the standoff outside his home near Bucks County's Lake Galena in August of last year. He was convicted in May of aggravated assault and simple assault, but acquitted by a jury of more serious charges, including one count of attempted homicide, by reason of insanity.
NEWS
May 22, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lithium, a drug commonly prescribed for manic depression, may also slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to University of Pennsylvania scientists. The Penn researchers tested lithium on mice genetically engineered to develop a form of Alzheimer's disease. They found the drug prevented the buildup of protein deposits, called plaques, that are characteristic of Alzheimer's and perhaps responsible for the devastating mental decline associated with it. The findings are published in today's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
April 30, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a newly minted Ph.D., Kay Redfield Jamison was at the top of her game at age 28, or so it seemed. Inside, she was wracked by restless highs and debilitating lows. Only later would she learn their source: manic-depressive illness. The disease caused her to act oddly. Once, she ran laps in a parking lot outside her office at 2 a.m., releasing manic energy. "I was running fast, but slowly going mad," she told about 1,000 people who came out in the rain to hear her tale of illness and recovery at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church earlier this week.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | By Lisa Suhay
In a living room a family mills around in a mechanical stupor attempting to continue their daily lives as if this day were no different from any other. They ignore the mental duck tape stretched in an X across their inner windows, protection from the shattering emotional blasts they know are coming. In an office a man is pacing and waiting for the phone to ring and give him the news that the worst has happened, again. At this moment there is someone who has decided not to take a pill that could save all of their lives.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia physician pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday to racketeering in connection with insurance fraud, illegal dispensing of prescription drugs, and sales of drug samples. Natawadee Steinhouse, 55, of Laverock, Montgomery County, who operated three offices in Philadelphia, was indicted in September and charged with submitting $1 million in fraudulent claims to health insurers. She also was accused of illegally issuing prescriptions for drugs, including painkillers, to addicts from 1989 to 1994.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a confession to police the morning after his wife was found shot to death, Robin A. Rucier described a life of debt, pain and hopelessness, a life that led him to "snap" on the morning of Sept. 4. "I just could not take it anymore," Rucier said in his statement, which was read at a preliminary hearing yesterday in Yeadon District Court. "I could not take the neglect and verbal abuse to me . . . and the neglect of the children. I just snapped. " Rucier, 46, is charged with first-degree murder, voluntary manslaughter, aggravated assault and possessing an instrument of crime in the fatal shooting of his wife in the bedroom of their East Lansdowne home.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Efforts to discover the genetic causes of schizophrenia, manic depression and other psychiatric disorders received a boost yesterday with the awarding of a $5.7 million contract to the Coriell Institute for Medical Research in Camden. The National Institute of Mental Health gave the nonprofit institute the money to set up a cell repository, or cell bank, that will store living human cells at extremely low temperatures. Within five years, Coriell expects to have in storage the cells of more than 6,000 people who suffer psychiatric illnesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boy Interrupted is a remarkable, deeply unsettling documentary about the life of Evan Perry, an uncommonly bright, talented boy from New York who committed suicide at age 15. It's all the more revealing, disturbing - and not a little bizarre - since it was made by the boy's parents, the husband-and-wife filmmaking team of Dana and Hart Perry. An educated, articulate couple, the Perrys seem to have documented every waking moment of their children's lives, which means we are given unprecedented firsthand footage of Evan literally from the moment he emerges from the womb to the weeks before his fatal jump from a window in his family's apartment in 2005.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Deeply personal and filled with love, Maya Forbes' Infinitely Polar Bear is nonetheless a hard movie to watch - hard to watch comfortably. Based on her experiences growing up with a father who was in and out of institutions, diagnosed with manic depression, Forbes' film throws a memoir-ish lasso around late-1970s Cambridge, Mass., where a family with a wildly careening dad, a mom trying to pursue a career, and two girls caught in the throes go...
NEWS
August 30, 2014
ISSUE | LABOR DEAL Own up, don't blame If my plane takes off at 2:00 but I arrive at the airport at 2:05, it is my fault that I missed it ("Carpenters ready and willing to work," Aug. 26). The Convention Center set a deadline for the unions. Two out of six missed the deadline. Whose fault was that? Union leaders are not doing their members any favors by blaming management. Union members should elect more responsible leaders who can follow the rules. Large ads in newspapers complaining about being locked out only serve to pass the buck for their irresponsibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Manic depression is touching my soul.   - Jimi Hendrix   It is a peculiarity of the modern American temperament that spiritual and mental health, no less than shoe styles or skirt lengths, are subject to fashions and fads. So it seems with bipolar mood disorder, which lately appears to pervade popular culture. Catherine Zeta-Jones, Demi Lovato, and Russell Brand have spoken out about their struggle with the illness. Michael Angelakos, lead singer of indie rockers Passion Pit, stunned the music press last summer when he came out as bipolar, while Sinead O'Connor canceled her tour last spring, citing the illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Forney is feeling good. She's happy, energetic, ecstatic. So good it's unreal. She doesn't need to eat or sleep - there's too much to do! A cartoonist with a loyal following, she's bursting with new ideas. She's flying high, confident, and to her delight, hyper-sexualized. Little does she know that a few months later, she'll be so down, she'll be unable to get out of bed. So opens Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me , an exhilarating, immensely enjoyable graphic memoir by the Philadelphia-raised artist that chronicles her years-long struggle with bipolar disorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2012 | Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lindsay Lohan was back on the set of her cable-TV movie Liz & Dick on Friday afternoon after she was ruled healthy by paramedics, her rep, Steve Honig, told the media Friday. The medics were called as a precaution by film producers after LiLo called to say she felt unwell. Honig denied claims LiLo was rushed to the hospital, saying she was exhausted and dehydrated. "She was on set last night at 7 p.m. and worked through the night until 8 a.m. this morning," said the rep.   Kim Kardashian: Totally "I'm totally growing up," Kim Kardashian, 31, says with mature exuberance in a chat with Oprah set to air Sunday and June 24 on OWN. Kim, who was married to some NBA player for 72 days, says she's glad she's dating a more mature man, referring to her P.R. stunt of a relationship with pal Kanye West.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Fellow jazzman Joe Lovano once described Odean Pope as a "bad, bad, bad, beautiful musician, man. " Anybody who has heard Pope reign supreme on tenor sax over the years couldn't argue with that. But after sitting down with Pope the other day and listening to him candidly share details of his decades-long struggle with a personal demon, I'd have to add another word to that riff of superlatives. Courageous . For more than 30 years, Pope has suffered from bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boy Interrupted is a remarkable, deeply unsettling documentary about the life of Evan Perry, an uncommonly bright, talented boy from New York who committed suicide at age 15. It's all the more revealing, disturbing - and not a little bizarre - since it was made by the boy's parents, the husband-and-wife filmmaking team of Dana and Hart Perry. An educated, articulate couple, the Perrys seem to have documented every waking moment of their children's lives, which means we are given unprecedented firsthand footage of Evan literally from the moment he emerges from the womb to the weeks before his fatal jump from a window in his family's apartment in 2005.
NEWS
August 21, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some people find Michael Jackson to be an odd man. Odd in appearance. Odd in behavior. If we begin with this premise, then news that he is looking to move to Liechtenstein may not seem all that odd. But then again, it is. Liechtenstein? Located in the Alpine region of Europe, Liechtenstein is one of the smallest countries in the world - 60 square miles, to be exact. In fact, it's not even referred to as a "country," but as a "principality. " It is renowned for its banking - like Switzerland, Liechtenstein is a tax haven where really wealthy people can stow their money in confidential bank accounts.
NEWS
April 30, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a newly minted Ph.D., Kay Redfield Jamison was at the top of her game at age 28, or so it seemed. Inside, she was wracked by restless highs and debilitating lows. Only later would she learn their source: manic-depressive illness. The disease caused her to act oddly. Once, she ran laps in a parking lot outside her office at 2 a.m., releasing manic energy. "I was running fast, but slowly going mad," she told about 1,000 people who came out in the rain to hear her tale of illness and recovery at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church earlier this week.
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