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Manifesto

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NEWS
April 6, 1996
Theodore John Kaczynski practiced the life that the Unabomber preached. The man federal officials said is the Unabomber, but had not yet charged, lived the anti-technology doctrine espoused in the terrorist's manifesto. Kaczynski has lived in the woods of Montana for years in a 10-by-12-foot cabin he built, without heater, electricity or running water. Kaczynski had connections with the same places as those identified with the Unabomber: He grew up in Chicago, taught at the University of California at Berkeley and worked in Salt Lake City - all sites of bomb blasts.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
LAST WEEK, I offered my personal political manifesto - the world according to me on 15 hot-button issues. Writing it was part of my post-election catharsis. Addressing everything from Iraq to gay rights, I shared my views with you, and then with my radio audience. Next, I posted the opinions on my Web site and invited people to weigh in and see where we agreed. Last weekend, 3,449 people did just that. That's a healthy sample by conventional polling standards, although I'm not qualified to tell you its statistical significance.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
I'M A BORN American. My country keeps taking people in from other countries. Why? We don't need new people. Our economy is bad. Our unemployment is awful. Public assistance goes to foreigners who have no idea how to speak our language. The rule should that natural-born citizens are first to be hired by any company. (That is the American way.) Why are the born Americans being stepped on by Washington? Isn't the government supposed to be for us, the American people? Come on, America.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | Associated Press O
SLO, Norway - Anders Behring Breivik said he was a boy when his life's path began to turn. It was during the first Gulf War, when a Muslim friend cheered at reports of missile attacks against American forces. "I was completely ignorant at the time and apolitical but his total lack of respect for my culture (and Western culture in general) actually sparked my interest and passion for it," Breivik, 32, the suspect in Norway's bombing and mass shooting wrote in his 1,500-page manifesto.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Ian MacDougall and Karl Ritter, Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - Anders Behring Breivik said he was a boy when his life's path began to turn. It was during the first Gulf War, when a Muslim friend cheered at reports of missile attacks against U.S. forces. "I was completely ignorant at the time and apolitical, but his total lack of respect for my culture (and Western culture in general) actually sparked my interest and passion for it," the suspect in Norway's bombing and mass shooting wrote in his 1,500-page manifesto. The Norwegian, 32, said it was the NATO bombing of Serbia in 1999 that "tipped the scales" for him because he sympathized with Serbia's crackdown on ethnic Albanian Muslims in Kosovo.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For any editor, the choices are terrible: Cave in to a notorious bomber, publish a lengthy diatribe and set a dangerous precedent. Refuse, and run the risk that the bomber will kill more people. That is what editors and publishers at the New York Times and the Washington Post face as they consider whether to run a 62-page, single-spaced manifesto from the Unabomber, whose 17 years of mail-bomb attacks have left three people dead and 23 wounded. "I can well understand an editor or publisher wanting to head off the possibility of a calamity by bending journalistic rules a bit," said Marvin Kalb, a former CBS News correspondent and now a media analyst.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | By E. J. DIONNE JR
This week, the war for the future of the Democratic Party begins. There will be no shooting, but make no mistake: The truce in the party will end at the exact moment when the last polling place closes in November. Today, a group of liberal and pro-labor politicians, activists and intellectuals will announce the creation of an organization called the Campaign for America's Future. The Campaign wants to do for liberal Democrats what the Democratic Leadership Council did for party moderates: to organize politically, to develop ideas and to change the terms of political debate.
NEWS
October 3, 1995
PUBLISHING MANIFESTO IS TESTAMENT TO A FREE PRESS I think many readers share my appreciation that journalists publicly gnashed their teeth over the Washington Post-New York Times decision to print the Unabomber's rambling manifesto. That display of anguish is just one more reason I believe these newspapers did the right thing. Those who fear this sets dangerous precedence for an autonomous press are unconvincing. Privately owned publications can't be forced to print what the government wants reported, and here two newspapers made the choice thoughtfully, but freely.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | By Roger Lane
Ever since the Washington Post printed the Unabomber's revolutionary manifesto-cum-ultimatum, on the promise that he would not kill again, most comment has focused on whether it should have been published, rather than what it has to say and how we will or should react. It was bound to leak out anyway; the decision to publish was on the one hand a surrender to blackmail, on the other made on advice of the Justice Department, which hoped it would save lives and help find the bomber.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER Dan DeLuca, Fred Beckley and Sara Sherr also contributed to this article
In the beginning was the manifesto. Seventeen years ago - as the Sex Pistols were caterwauling their way into rock-and-roll infamy - Jon Langford and his mates at England's University of Leeds were planning the ultimate subversive pop group. Its name would be the Mekons. It would be the band that didn't make records. The band that didn't have its photograph taken. Or did interviews. And no member would ever play an instrument. "It was quite an extreme manifesto," Langford said from a recording studio in Chicago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2011
IT'S ALWAYS RISKY to start off with a ridiculously theoretical concept from France, especially one named something as ridiculous as Le Fooding. But if we're going to talk about what's happening with the dining scene on 18th Street near Rittenhouse, we should bring a little French theory into our lives. Le Fooding - a combination of the English words "food" and "feeling" - is an anarchic, hard-to-describe movement that began more than a decade ago in Paris, created by two prominent critics who wanted to shake up the scene and challenge the authority, the tyranny of stuffy, traditional French dining.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | Associated Press O
SLO, Norway - Anders Behring Breivik said he was a boy when his life's path began to turn. It was during the first Gulf War, when a Muslim friend cheered at reports of missile attacks against American forces. "I was completely ignorant at the time and apolitical but his total lack of respect for my culture (and Western culture in general) actually sparked my interest and passion for it," Breivik, 32, the suspect in Norway's bombing and mass shooting wrote in his 1,500-page manifesto.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Ian MacDougall and Karl Ritter, Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - Anders Behring Breivik said he was a boy when his life's path began to turn. It was during the first Gulf War, when a Muslim friend cheered at reports of missile attacks against U.S. forces. "I was completely ignorant at the time and apolitical, but his total lack of respect for my culture (and Western culture in general) actually sparked my interest and passion for it," the suspect in Norway's bombing and mass shooting wrote in his 1,500-page manifesto. The Norwegian, 32, said it was the NATO bombing of Serbia in 1999 that "tipped the scales" for him because he sympathized with Serbia's crackdown on ethnic Albanian Muslims in Kosovo.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
I'M A BORN American. My country keeps taking people in from other countries. Why? We don't need new people. Our economy is bad. Our unemployment is awful. Public assistance goes to foreigners who have no idea how to speak our language. The rule should that natural-born citizens are first to be hired by any company. (That is the American way.) Why are the born Americans being stepped on by Washington? Isn't the government supposed to be for us, the American people? Come on, America.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
LAST WEEK, I offered my personal political manifesto - the world according to me on 15 hot-button issues. Writing it was part of my post-election catharsis. Addressing everything from Iraq to gay rights, I shared my views with you, and then with my radio audience. Next, I posted the opinions on my Web site and invited people to weigh in and see where we agreed. Last weekend, 3,449 people did just that. That's a healthy sample by conventional polling standards, although I'm not qualified to tell you its statistical significance.
NEWS
May 25, 2006
IT'S SO NICE TO be able to drop into a restaurant in New Jersey and know that your meal will not include anyone's cigarette toxins. Even the nonsmoking areas in many Pennsylvania diners are a joke unless they were to be air-tight. Smokers, like alcoholics and addicts, will always have an attitude about their obnoxious behavior. To actually argue that you have a right to poison the air breathed in by others who don't share your addiction is absurd. An airtight "smoker tank" would be acceptable inside an eating establishment so the next generation of kids could observe the smoke and the people willing to sit in it, smell like it and cough a lot in order to assert their right to risk heart disease and cancer at greatly increased levels from the nonsmoker.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | By TERRY GILLEN
NO ONE has to remind Philadelphians that taxes are the price we pay for living in a civilized society, as Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. noted. Philadelphians are among the highest-taxed people in the United States. But the wage-tax debate this spring should have been a warning to our elected officials that the willingness of city residents to pay taxes was at the breaking point. And the latest round of property-tax assessments did just that. There are four things that city residents want - that they are not getting - in this reassessment battle: transparency, fairness, certainty and something for their money.
NEWS
April 11, 2001
I once enjoyed listening to singer-turned- political-expert Barbra Strei- sand. Now I cannot stand the sight of her. She tells us (OpEd column April 6) President Bush is for corporate America and Bill Clinton was for the people. Was he for the people when he sold us out by sending our manufacturing overseas? Check out any store, and you'll see that most things are now made in China. She tells us Democrats have given us 30 years of social progress, but those same Democrats have taken prayer out of schools, weakened our military strength and messed up our country by disallowing discipline in the schools.
NEWS
September 22, 2000
To The French Government: Now we understand. Seventy-five years ago, in Paris, artist Andre Breton wrote the first Surrealist Manifesto, defining a major art movement that, along with Dada, celebrated irrationality, dream states and the suspension of logic. Your continued refusal to return Ira Einhorn to the U.S. must be your idea of an amusing way to celebrate the anniversary. Any other logical conclusion escapes us. For how else would one celebrate a movement known for a painting of a pipe with the caption "this is not a pipe" (our homage to Magritte's "The Wind and the Song" is to the right)
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | By Gwynne Dyer
A designer version of Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto is coming out to mark the 150th anniversary of its first publication in 1848. "The book will be finely crafted and of exceptional beauty," burbled Emilia La Fuente Sanchez of Verso Books, "bound in high-quality cloth, with colored page-ends, a ribbon page-marker, and a stunning jacket illustration. " Republication was the least that could be done for the old boy after the worst decade for Marxism since he came up with the idea - and the publisher even got Eric Hobsbawn, the English-speaking world's best-known Marxist historian (all right, its only famous Marxist historian)
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