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NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fifth and final vinyl-chloride train car was removed from the East Jefferson Street Bridge derailment site in Paulsboro, officials said Sunday. Cleanup is progressing steadily under the direction of five agencies working together as a "unified command," Coast Guard spokesman Nick Ameen said. Ameen said the railcars were being secured on a barge in Mantua Creek. The bridge must now undergo repairs and inspection before returning to operation. "Once the bridge is deemed safe, that's when they'll be rewheeling the cars on the track," he said.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Work crews used a 150-ton crane today to remove a tank car that was breached and leaked its toxic contents when it fell into Mantua Creek off a failed railroad bridge in Paulsboro Nov. 30. A Conrail spokesman announced the operation early this evening. The car, one of four that ended up in the water, was carrying toxic vinyl chloride, some of which escaped into the air as a gas and forced the evacuation of hundreds of nearby residents for days. Cleanup crews finally removed the chemical from the car three days ago. Three other tank cars are still in the waterway.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another lost summer is in store for boaters in Mantua Creek, a lingering consequence of the November 2012 train derailment in Paulsboro. Marine traffic in the creek, which leads to the Delaware River, will continue to be stifled by bridge construction for nearly a year longer, according to a work update released by Conrail on Wednesday. The rail company - which is replacing the bridge at East Jefferson Street where the derailment and chemical spill occurred - announced it expected work on the new bridge's lift mechanism to be complete by April 1, 2016.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
GREENWICH TWP. An empty tanker car of a train on its way to the Paulsboro refinery derailed just after noon Monday about a half-mile south of the scene of a derailment last year that caused a toxic chemical release. None of the other tanker cars went off the tracks Monday. At least one of the tankers carried liquefied petroleum gas, Greenwich Police Chief Joseph M. Giordano Jr. said. No leaks were detected, he said. Liquefied petroleum gas consists mostly of propane and butane, and is found in gas wells and oil wells.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the commotion of 50,000 people carrying out their lives in Mantua, Deptford, and Wenonah, the towering trees and gentle flow of the Mantua Creek at the former Maple Ridge golf course offer welcome serenity. A six-year fight to preserve those 112 acres is approaching victory, preservationists say, as the state appears poised to sign a contract with a Washington, developer to create Gloucester County's first state park. State Department of Environmental Protection officials are using the working name "Tall Pines State Preserve," a nod to the former golf course's name before it became Ron Jaworski's Eagles Nest and then Maple Ridge.
NEWS
December 1, 2012 | By Robert Moran and Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
About 500 residents were evacuated Friday night from about a 12-block radius around the scene of a train derailment in Paulsboro, Gloucester County, after elevated levels of a toxic chemical were detected in the air. A bridge over the Mantua Creek collapsed about 7 a.m., sending four tanker cars into the creek. The cars were carrying vinyl chloride, a flammable, colorless gas that can cause dizziness, drowsiness, and headaches. One car ruptured, sending thousands of gallons of the chemical into the air. The precautionary evacuation was announced around 6 p.m. and the residents were told it was possible they might not be allowed to return for several days, said U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Drew Madjeska, spokesman for agencies responding to the derailment.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Air-monitor technicians have inspected 155 Paulsboro homes and 10 businesses, and no toxic chemicals have been detected, Coast Guard Petty Officer Nick Ameen said Saturday. The testing began at noon Friday and continues. Residents in 25 homes have declined testing, Ameen said. Most Paulsboro residents who were evacuated after the freight-train derailment Nov. 30 on a bridge over Mantua Creek have returned home. Residents of 10 homes closest to the bridge cannot go home yet because heavy machinery and other equipment are still in the area, the officer said.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
PAULSBORO - The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday that it will hold a two-day investigative hearing July 9-10 in Washington as part of its probe into last year's train derailment in Paulsboro. The board is investigating the cause of the derailment, which occurred on Nov. 30 after a bridge failed over Mantua Creek. Four tanker cars fell into the creek, one of which released thousands of gallons of toxic vinyl chloride into the atmosphere, forcing nearly 700 people from their homes, some for a week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes to get people to listen, some would say, you need a mother's touch. And a child's smile doesn't hurt, either. Trisha Sheehan knows this. On a sunny day last month, Sheehan arrived at a Paulsboro park by the Delaware River with her 5-year-old son, Liam, as environmentalists gathered to lambaste the state's proposed contamination settlement with ExxonMobil Corp. The boy offered a quiet hello from his mother's arms before she spoke against the deal. "It's their future planet that we need to be protecting," Sheehan, 35, said recently at her Wenonah home, where Liam ran about in a red shirt bearing the name of Moms Clean Air Force.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another lost summer is in store for boaters in Mantua Creek, a lingering consequence of the November 2012 train derailment in Paulsboro. Marine traffic in the creek, which leads to the Delaware River, will continue to be stifled by bridge construction for nearly a year longer, according to a work update released by Conrail on Wednesday. The rail company - which is replacing the bridge at East Jefferson Street where the derailment and chemical spill occurred - announced it expected work on the new bridge's lift mechanism to be complete by April 1, 2016.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of 16 emergency responders seeking compensation and medical monitoring for health concerns stemming from a 2012 train derailment and toxic spill in Paulsboro. The lawsuit names Conrail, CSX, and Norfolk Southern, which operate a bridge that malfunctioned and caused the accident. It also names the Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, a consulting firm hired to assess medical problems. A lawyer representing the workers said the firm, hired by the railroad companies, either failed to take urine samples for medical monitoring or lost them.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A string of weather stations will be placed near I-295 and rail lines to assist Gloucester County officials should an event like the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment and toxic leak occur again. The county Prosecutor's Office announced this week that it had secured $150,000 in funding to buy and maintain nine of the devices, which officials say can help them make critical decisions during emergencies. The stations can measure wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The incessant banging of a pile driver Thursday marked another day of construction in the replacement of the East Jefferson Street Bridge over Mantua Creek in Paulsboro - the setting of a notorious train accident nearly two years ago. Though it was a sign of progress, it was to some an irritating reminder. "We're quite pleased that there's work going on," said Assemblyman John J. Burzichelli (D., Gloucester), but he added that the noise drowning out much of the early-afternoon news conference demonstrated "how the railroad conducts itself.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
AN AFTERNOON TRAIN rolled out of Paulsboro yesterday, a moving chain of black and gray chemical tankers curving away after passing over Mantua Creek, just a few hours after some long-awaited news had rolled into the Gloucester County town. Earlier in the day, 130 miles away in Washington, D.C., the National Transportation Safety Board met to review the developments that had occurred before, during and after a Conrail train derailed and released a toxic cloud of vinyl chloride in the tough, 2-square-mile town along the Delaware River on Nov. 30, 2012.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was fog outside the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ in Paulsboro when Jesse Campbell left morning prayer service around 7 a.m. on Nov. 30, 2012, to go home. He said Tuesday he didn't know at the time that the fog was vinyl chloride that leaked during a train derailment or that it could contaminate the borough's air. It was several days before he was stopped by Paulsboro police from going to his shop, where he details cars and does auto repair work, and told he needed to evacuate the area, he said.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Traveling across the Mantua Creek into Paulsboro's two square miles of aging infrastructure, there's a modest-seeming collection of local history on the left, right, and below. There's the home of the borough's namesake family, the house-turned-library built in 1806, and a Native American encampment under the dirt and grass. The triad of sites at Broad and Commerce Streets have become a lesson in preservation amid present-day realities. Officials this week will break ground on a long-planned expansion of the Gill Memorial Library, which was a house, general store, and doctor's office before it was donated to the borough in 1949.
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state study conducted in the aftermath of the 2012 train derailment in Paulsboro found that more than half of those interviewed reported new or intensified health issues in the days after the accident. Most commonly, residents noted experiencing headaches, respiratory symptoms, and coughing in the week after the Nov. 30 accident, according to the Department of Health report, based on two surveys. In its findings, 58 percent of those interviewed in person and 66 percent of those responding to a mail-in survey said they experienced "new or worsening symptoms" in the week after the derailment, which leaked about 20,000 gallons of toxic vinyl chloride into the atmosphere.
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