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Mantua

NEWS
April 6, 2012
A 30-year-old West Philadelphia man has been arrested and charged with killing his ex-girlfriend and trying to cover up the crime by setting fire to a car with her body inside, police said today. Tinesha Carr, 33, a mother of two from Wynnefield, was found dead in the burning car early Sunday in Feltonville. Police said she had been shot several times. On Wednesday, homicide detectives arrested Daniel Soler, of the 3200 block of Brandywine Street in the Mantua section, and charged him with murder, arson, and related offenses.
SPORTS
February 5, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ask Bob Folwell to describe himself in 25 words or fewer and the Friends' Central basketball coach comes up with the following response: "Robert Folwell is a people person," he said. "He's a person who has a lot of passion, a lot of love. He's a person who wants to pass that passion, that love on to his family and to people around him. " He then talks about making a difference. "I don't care if it's to one kid or to 30 kids," Folwell said. "That's what life's all about.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Dupree says city officials are trying to pave paradise and put up a supermarket. Dupree, a renowned Philadelphia artist, is embroiled in a bitter back-and-forth with the city over the fate of his art studio, an 8,600-square-foot building that takes up nearly a block along Haverford Avenue in the Mantua section of West Philadelphia. The property was seized in December 2012 by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority. The authority condemned a two-block stretch through eminent domain, a legal process that allows government to take private property, pay the owner, and develop the land for public use. When the authority seized the Mantua property, it said the surrounding neighborhood was in desperate need of a supermarket.
NEWS
June 2, 2009 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By the time he was 42, Miles Mack had become a neighborhood icon in Mantua, running basketball games and changing lives at McAlpin Playground. Then a bullet took his life in that very park. When the idea of naming the park after him was proposed after his death in September, his mother, Sandra Mack, didn't see much use in it. But as the months passed, she came to believe that having his name there would remind kids that there was at least one person who always had their back. "Miles loved the kids in Mantua," she said.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A fossil-rich Gloucester County sandpit that has long provided a window into the past may also hold a view of the future. The Inversand Co., the Township of Mantua, and Drexel University are working on a preliminary proposal to transform the 65-acre site near Route 55 into an educational attraction. While no costs have been estimated or drawings made, the concept calls for creating a "world-class fossil park" where children and adults could enjoy hands-on experience of paleontology.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITMAN It's time to make the doughnuts. The landmark Pitman Bakery is scheduled to reopen in the spring after closing more than a year ago, leaving a void along South Broadway storefronts. Retired Deptford Police Chief Dan Murphy, 47, and his wife, Veronica, 48, a registered nurse, are starting a new career and family business. They say they will carry forward some of the traditions of the former bakery while they merge it with their vision for a modern shop. "We're going to do our best to live up to the old standards and hope to see the same success," said Dan Murphy, who will oversee maintenance and finances, while his wife will be in charge of baking.
REAL_ESTATE
May 4, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
At 86, Delores Clark is no homebody. Twice a week, she can be found at the local senior center perfecting her line-dancing skills, said daughter Brenda Jones. Her mother also bowls and travels regularly, she said. Although her hearing is not what it was - "She says I'm mumbling," Jones said - Clark won't move from the house on Melon Street in the city's Mantua section where she has lived since her father bought it for $2,000 when she was 9 years old. Like many elderly Philadelphians, however, Clark had trouble making needed repairs to the house, built in the 1920s, let alone changes such as grab bars that would make it easier for her to live there if her health truly became an issue for her. "There were two joists that split and needed to be replaced," Jones said, "and a lot of the plumbing repairs were patchwork.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The house is a wreck, all broken windows and boarded doors, soon to be torn down. But Annie Hunt remembers when the home was alive - a place of light and laughter, a haven for a mother and son. The West Philadelphia property belonged to a strong and determined woman, Hunt's aunt Leona Richardson. As a teenager in the late 1930s, Richardson struck out alone from the segregated South, leaving small-town Louisiana and making her way to Baltimore. When World War II broke out, she got a job in a defense plant as a welder.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
At some city public schools, there is no recess at all - deep budget cuts mean there are not enough adults to monitor students' playtime. But at McMichael Elementary in Mantua, children troop out onto the schoolyard in orderly lines, pledge to be respectful and kind, then break out into orderly but joyous games of football, dodgeball and foursquare - blowing off steam with a genial man known as Coach Steve. McMichael is one of 13 Philadelphia School District schools and three city charters that use Playworks, a nonprofit that places a full-time staffer in schools to structure recess.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
ARTIST James Dupree says that despite the city's "You're gonna love the arts in Philly" slogan, Philadelphia hasn't been showing him any love. Instead, Dupree said, he has been confronted with pain and despair over a continuing legal struggle with the city to keep his studio space in Mantua. The city Redevelopment Authority wants to take his massive, 8,600 square-foot studio building, on Haverford Avenue near 36th Street, to make room for a supermarket and parking lot. His studio is filled with 5,000 works of art - including wildly colorful pieces, mixed-media jewelry boxes with feathers, and a wall installation showing how the city helps developers take property from low-income homeowners.
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