CollectionsManuscript
IN THE NEWS

Manuscript

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Begin at the beginning,' the King said, very gravely, 'and go on till you come to the end: then stop.' " That's all well and good for Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland . But newspaper stories begin at the end and progress to the beginning, although sometimes they start out in the middle and circle around themselves. So the end of this newspaper story is this: The original handwritten manuscript of Alice's Adventures Underground is on display at the Rosenbach Museum and Library on the 2000 block of Delancey Place from Wednesday through Sunday only, on special loan from the British Library.
NEWS
August 7, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A foundation that operates Pearl S. Buck's birthplace museum in West Virginia now claims it owns the recently recovered manuscript of The Good Earth, complicating a dispute over the author's Pulitzer Prize-winning masterwork. The Pearl S. Buck Birthplace Foundation in Hillsboro, W.Va., which owns most of Buck's manuscripts, says the Nobel laureate included The Good Earth manuscript on the list of items she donated to the foundation before her death in 1973. The foundation's claim comes on the eve of a settlement between Buck's heirs and Pearl S. Buck International, a nonprofit known as PSBI and located near Perkasie in Bucks County.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By LYNNE TUOHY, Associated Press
CONCORD, N.H. - Truman Capote's 1958 typed manuscript of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is rife with the author's handwritten edits - most notably changing the femme fatale's name from Connie Gustafson to the now-iconic Holly Golightly. Its plot - built around a young woman who supports herself through trysts with various wealthy lovers - was controversial. Harper's Bazaar bought serialization rights for $2,000, then balked at its explicit content and profuse profanity. Esquire magazine purchased it from Harper's and launched it to its 1961 silver-screen adaptation, starring Audrey Hepburn.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
In a concert packed with anticipation, pianist Marc-Andre Hamelin last night played two Mozart works from a manuscript that had been considered lost since 1915. His performances at Eastern Baptist Seminary's chapel were realized from the manuscripts for the Fantasia in C minor (K. 475) from 1785 and the Sonata in C minor (K. 457) from 1784. The works were together in a 14-page manuscript that was rediscovered last July in a safe at the seminary. The manuscript - and others of works by Haydn, Johann Strauss, Meyerbeer and Spohr - were donated to the school by Margaret Treat Doane of Cincinnati.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The priceless original text of the first half of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, missing since the mid-1880s, has been found gathering dust in an attic in Los Angeles, Sotheby's auction house announced yesterday. Matthew Weigman, a spokesman for Sotheby's in Los Angeles, said the 665- page handwritten manuscript had been examined by a number of experts and authenticated as the missing work. "It would certainly be the greatest literary discovery of the 20th century," said William H. Loos, rare-book curator at the Buffalo and Erie County (N.Y.
NEWS
June 27, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI's Philadelphia office has recovered the "priceless" lost manuscript of Pearl S. Buck's The Good Earth, the novel that won the Bucks County resident the Pulitzer Prize and was instrumental in her winning the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938. The bureau scheduled a news conference for this morning to announce the recovery of the typewritten manuscript, which was consigned this month to the Samuel T. Freeman Co. auction house. "The manuscript has been missing since at least 1966 and is considered priceless," the FBI said in a news release yesterday.
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty-four years after Pearl S. Buck's death, rivals still are fighting for control of the Nobel laureate's substantial legacy. The stakes were raised last week after the FBI announced it had recovered the lost original manuscript of Buck's masterpiece, The Good Earth , which won the 1932 Pulitzer Prize. Buck's heirs hoped that the discovery would renew interest in her work. It also seems likely to reignite a bitter ownership fight between the heirs and the Bucks County foundation that bears her name.
NEWS
September 14, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For now, The Good Earth will stay buried. Officials at Pearl S. Buck International in Perkasie announced yesterday that a cache of letters sent to the famed author from politicians and celebrities would go on display immediately. But the widely anticipated public viewing of the hand-annotated manuscript of Buck's Pulitzer-Prize-winning novel has been postponed indefinitely. The Buck family estate, which has the manuscript, decided to hold off lending while awaiting a possible legal claim by managers of the Pearl S. Buck Birthplace in Hillsboro, W.Va.
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About a month ago, Susan Dempster went into the cluttered basement of her Montgomery County home to investigate the telltale odor of a dead rodent. "Here I go looking for a dead mouse," said Dempster, 59, who lives in a house that borders the Blue Bell Country Club. "What do I find? A live catch. " Amid the stacked belongings of her departed parents, Dempster lifted the lid of an aging suitcase. Inside was the typed and hand-edited manuscript of The Good Earth, Pearl S. Buck's Pulitzer Prize masterpiece that was instrumental in her winning the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938.
NEWS
February 24, 2009 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was her publisher - and future husband - who gave her the title. She had planned to name her novel after the lead character, Wang Lung. He persuaded her that, for one, nobody was going to buy a book that sounded like "One Lung. " And, for another, so epic a book deserved a title to match. Pearl Buck took Richard Walsh's suggestion and renamed her novel The Good Earth. Now, finally, four decades after its mysterious disappearance, and two years after it was recovered by the FBI, the original, hand-edited manuscript of The Good Earth is about to go on display in Bucks County.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 2016
By Jon Caroulis I discovered my hero when I was 21. He is Max Perkins, one of America's greatest literary editors and the subject of the new film Genius . I was an aspiring writer of nonfiction, and possibly fiction, when I read a wonderful biography of Perkins by A. Scott Berg, which is the basis for the movie. Perkins was at Charles Scribner's Sons and was editor to F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, and many other notable writers. What made him heroic to me, as I read Berg's book, was how determined he was to get Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Wolfe published when his own firm - and many others - had rejected them.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Begin at the beginning,' the King said, very gravely, 'and go on till you come to the end: then stop.' " That's all well and good for Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland . But newspaper stories begin at the end and progress to the beginning, although sometimes they start out in the middle and circle around themselves. So the end of this newspaper story is this: The original handwritten manuscript of Alice's Adventures Underground is on display at the Rosenbach Museum and Library on the 2000 block of Delancey Place from Wednesday through Sunday only, on special loan from the British Library.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA While serving 12 years in state prison for armed robbery and assault, Phillip Eric Weems renounced his violent past and wrote a book detailing the more enlightened path he planned to pursue upon his release. "White-collar crime is one of the most sophisticated rackets of illegal activity today," he said in his jailhouse manuscript. "Unlimited amounts of money can be made virtually overnight, and the parties involved usually face minimal and/or no consequences at all. " Weems was right about one thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Step off the elevator into the University of Pennsylvania's hallowed rare-book room at the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, and you immediately recognize something is different. Where's the wood? Van Pelt is notorious for being one of Philadelphia's harsher examples of '60s-era Brutalist architecture, with walls made of bare concrete block and prison-size windows, and yet its rare-book room was always decorated as though it were part of some English manor house. Deeply carved, 16th-century oak paneling greeted visitors in the entryway.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that you have the opportunity to buy a 600-year-old cookbook. It's even rarer that the ancient handwritten recipes detail how to create the Philosopher's Stone - essential in transforming base metals into gold. So it's hardly a surprise that James R. Voelkel, rare-book curator at the Chemical Heritage Foundation , 315 Chestnut St., was intrigued to learn that Joost R. Ritman's Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica, an Amsterdam library of philosophical arcana and "secrets," might bring a number of manuscripts to the market.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
TIMBUKTU, Mali - Islamic radicals destroyed 4,000 ancient manuscripts during their occupation of Timbuktu, according to the findings of a U.N. expert mission. The damage amounts to about one-tenth of the manuscripts being stored in the fabled northern city. The majority of the documents dating to the 13th century were saved by the devotion of the library's Malian custodians, who spirited them out of the occupied city in rice sacks, on donkey carts, by motorcycle, by boat, and by 4-by-4.
NEWS
May 25, 2013
An article on Friday on a newly discovered Pearl S. Buck novel misstated the chain by which the manuscript came into the hands of the Pearl S. Buck Family Trust. An unnamed woman in Texas contacted Pearl S. Buck International (PSBI), an organization separate from the trust. PSBI referred the matter to the trust, administered by Edgar S. Walsh, one of Buck's sons. The trust acquired the manuscript for a small sum. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It was a scenario right out of Storage Wars . " Michael Carlisle of InkWell Management in New York represents the estate of Pearl S. Buck, the Nobel Prize-winning author of The Good Earth who lived much of her life in Bucks County. He is trying to describe the moment a previously unknown Buck novel was discovered in a storage unit in, of all places, Texas. As announced Wednesday, the novel, titled The Eternal Wonder , will be published, in digital and paperback editions, on Oct. 22 by Open Road Integrated Media of New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By LYNNE TUOHY, Associated Press
CONCORD, N.H. - Truman Capote's 1958 typed manuscript of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is rife with the author's handwritten edits - most notably changing the femme fatale's name from Connie Gustafson to the now-iconic Holly Golightly. Its plot - built around a young woman who supports herself through trysts with various wealthy lovers - was controversial. Harper's Bazaar bought serialization rights for $2,000, then balked at its explicit content and profuse profanity. Esquire magazine purchased it from Harper's and launched it to its 1961 silver-screen adaptation, starring Audrey Hepburn.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A trove of ancient manuscripts in Hebrew characters rescued from caves in a Taliban stronghold in northern Afghanistan is providing the first physical evidence of a Jewish community that thrived there a thousand years ago. On Thursday, Israel's National Library unveiled the cache of recently purchased documents that run the gamut of life experiences, including biblical commentaries, personal letters, and financial records. Researchers say the "Afghan Genizah" marks the greatest such archive found since the "Cairo Genizah" was discovered in an Egyptian synagogue more than 100 years ago, a vast depository of medieval manuscripts considered to be among the most valuable collections of historical documents ever found.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|