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Mao

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NEWS
July 21, 1986 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Editorial Board
Rong Zhi Run, a handsome, articulate man in a faded blue pin-stripe suit is both a Communist Party member and the head of Guangzhou's association of private businesses. His members include the estimated 90,000 families in Guangzhou (formerly Canton) who now run small private enterprises including tailor shops, hair dressing salons, shoe stores and restaurants. "Private businesses provide convenience services to the citizens and employment for young people seeking jobs," says Rong, who runs a private breakfast stall with his wife.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Q: What's "the Dow"? - G.W., Fresno, Calif.   A: It's the Dow Jones Industrial Average, created in 1896 by Charles Dow, who also established The Wall Street Journal . The Dow is viewed by many as representing the entire stock market, but it's really just an index of 30 major American companies: 3M, Alcoa, American Express, AT&T, Bank of America, Boeing, Caterpillar, Chevron, Cisco Systems, Coca-Cola, DuPont, ExxonMobil, General Electric,...
NEWS
February 23, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Soviet President Andrei A. Gromyko says in his memoirs that he rebuffed a 1958 proposal by Mao Tse-tung that the Soviet Union help lure U.S. troops into China, where they would be attacked with nuclear weapons, according to a published report. Gromyko's two-volume memoir covers nearly 50 years of Soviet diplomacy, including dealings with nine American presidents, according to the New York Times, which said an advance copy was made available to its Moscow bureau. In Memoir, expected to be distributed to Soviet bookstores in the next few weeks by its Soviet publisher, Gromyko says he was on a secret visit to Beijing in August 1958 when Mao made his proposal.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The voice was hollow and haunting, calling out to Yang Rui in her dream like a faceless stranger whispering through a heavy fog. "Zhang hei hei!" - "Zhang is black! Black!" Yang woke with a start and lay in bed wondering. Who was talking to her? Zhang is not an unusual name in China, but she didn't know anyone who had it. And "Black!" What nonsense was that? For days, the voice echoed in Yang's mind as she went about her barnyard chores on a vast commune in northeastern China.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The old peasant remembered how quiet her village became during the famine of 1960. All the children had starved to death - the girls first, because they were given smaller rations of food. All the animals had been eaten. Even the scritch-scratch of mice at night had disappeared: Mice were food. Often, villagers were so weak with hunger they simply fell over and died - and stayed there because no one else had the energy to move them. The wail of crying babies had stopped; women no longer could bear children.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
WINDOW-SHOPPING IN THE FAST LANE A British car dealer proudly put his latest model in his showroom window on Wednesday - low mileage, beautiful trimmings. And a steal at just $4 million. The Ferrari 250 GTO, the most expensive car ever to change hands, was flown from Japan to London by John Collins, chairman of a "classic" car dealership in Surrey, south of London. One of only 39 GTO models ever made, the red Ferrari was bought by a Japanese businessman for $15.65 million in 1989 from another Briton who had paid a trifling $7,826 for it in 1971.
NEWS
March 16, 2005
RE "Beijing resolute on Taiwan status": I was disappointed that this Associated Press story did not have the fact that Taiwan has not been part of China far longer than it has been part. As I understand it, Taiwan was a backwater too far from China to be of interest to China's emperors. The Dutch held it for a while. In the 1800s, China claimed it to keep it out of Japan's spreading empire but lost it in a treaty in that century. After WWII, Japan lost it back to China. Shortly after, Chiang Kai-Shek's government fled there to escape Mao's forces.
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
China's senior leader, Deng Xiaoping, said yesterday that it was time for him "to go to the beach again," signaling the start of the annual seaside horse-trading among the country's leadership. "As long as I can swim, I will be healthy," Deng told visiting Brazilian President Jose Sarney, who had complimented the 83-year-old leader on his good health. "And now it's time to go to the beach again. " Every year, as Beijing stifles in summer heat, China's leaders repair to Beidaihe, staying in heavily guarded villas in the east coast resort to map out and negotiate the country's future.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
The Story of an Ordinary Man Who Defaced an Icon and Unmasked a Dictatorship By Denise Chong Counterpoint. 256 pp. $26 Reviewed by Jeff Gammage Whenever I visit Tiananmen Square, with its iconic portrait of Mao, I like to try to pick out the plainclothes police among the crowds of tourists. The security cameras are, of course, easier to spot. The square constitutes some of the world's most sensitive real estate. In her revealing book, author Denise Chong explains how it got that way. Egg on Mao: The Story of an Ordinary Man Who Defaced an Icon and Unmasked a Dictatorship is the tale of Lu Decheng, a bus mechanic with a rebellious bent.
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NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
China's global economic expansion has been slow to include a matching rise in cultural institutions among its exports, but Friday brought a major step toward changing that when a youthful orchestra from Beijing played an internationally televised concert at the Kimmel Center. The concert by the NCPA Orchestra had special resonance here, because the Philadelphia Orchestra played in 1973 in a nation that had once put its musicians in coal mines and closed universities and conservatories but was cautiously peering over its cultural wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
SEVEN YEARS after Miss America hightailed it to Las Vegas, the mother (or is that big sister?) of all beauty pageants is back from whence she came. Of course, you'll be pummeled with a stiletto heel by a Miss America Organization staffer if you actually describe the 92-year-old extravaganza as a "beauty pageant. " It is, as MAO types are always reminding us, a "scholarship program," albeit one whose winners' attractiveness can be considered well above the national average. But there's no denying that the pageant was conceived in 1921 (no doubt with the blessing of vice lord Enoch "Nucky" Johnson)
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Xu Liangying, 92, a renowned Chinese rights advocate, physicist, and translator of Albert Einstein's writings, died Jan. 28, in Beijing's university district, where he lived for many years. No cause of death was given. Mr. Xu began translating Einstein in 1962 after being forced to leave his job as editor of a leading science journal for criticizing the policies of the Communist Party led by Mao Tse-tung. He was the main translator of the three volumes of The Collected Works of Einstein in Chinese and initiated or wrote numerous letters and petitions defending human rights.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Q: What's "the Dow"? - G.W., Fresno, Calif.   A: It's the Dow Jones Industrial Average, created in 1896 by Charles Dow, who also established The Wall Street Journal . The Dow is viewed by many as representing the entire stock market, but it's really just an index of 30 major American companies: 3M, Alcoa, American Express, AT&T, Bank of America, Boeing, Caterpillar, Chevron, Cisco Systems, Coca-Cola, DuPont, ExxonMobil, General Electric,...
NEWS
September 2, 2012
By Gail Tsukiyama St. Martin. 288 pp. $24.99 Reviewed by Andrew Ervin The title of Gail Tsukiyama's charming new novel derives from a quotation from Mao Tse-tung: "Let a hundred flowers bloom; let a hundred schools of thought contend. " It's a curious source of inspiration, considering that Mao's administration seemed to do the exact opposite, and that the Chairman is both the primary antagonist of the book and a sinister force lurking behind the day-to-day doings of a humble Chinese family in 1958.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Victor Davis Hanson
An open microphone recently caught French President Nicolas Sarkozy and President Obama jointly trashing Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Sarkozy scoffed, "I cannot stand him. He's a liar. " Obama trumped that with, "You're fed up with him, but I have to deal with him every day. " In one of the most bizarre op-eds published by the New York Times in recent memory, Paul Kane suggested that the United States could literally sell out its support for democratic Taiwan for about $1 trillion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Half the Sky: Women in the New Art of China," an important exhibition now at Drexel University, is the first independent show of Chinese women's art in the United States to have the range and depth of a survey. Featuring more than 70 works in varied media by 23 visual artists, the event is cohosted by its organizers, the National Art Museum of China and Drexel, which has a number of collaborative ties with Chinese universities. The national museum chose the show's theme, Drexel suggested its title, and together they chose the artists - some living in China and some in its diaspora.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adrian I. Lee, 90, a longtime reporter and columnist for the Bulletin, died of a respiratory infection Wednesday, June 15, at Cathedral Village, a retirement community in Roxborough. Mr. Lee joined the Evening Bulletin in 1948 as a general assignment and police reporter. He later was a rewrite man, a national reporter, and an editorial writer, and was a conservative columnist when the paper closed in 1982. In 1998, Mr. Lee contributed an essay for a collection of reminiscences about the Bulletin, titled "I Loved Every Minute.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
By Lisa See Random House. 354 pp. $26 Reviewed by Malena Watrous American literature is full of immigration stories, for obvious reasons. Less common are stories of new Americans returning to the countries they or their parents left behind, often at great expense and risk. This is what happens in Dreams of Joy . Lisa See's latest novel begins with a young woman's flight from Los Angeles to China, in 1957, right at the start of Chairman Mao's Great Leap Forward. Joy is a recent college graduate who got swept up in the rhetoric of an activist group that supported Mao and his revolutionary cause from afar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - The Metropolitan Opera has always been more a point of arrival than origination for singers - or repertoire such as John Adams' Nixon in China . So let's not get soapbox-y about the fact that this groundbreaking 1987 opera - about Richard Nixon's even more groundbreaking opening of relations with Communist China - only made its Met debut on Wednesday, and be glad that it was heartily embraced rather than suffering the fate of Carlisle Floyd's...
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