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Maple Syrup

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FOOD
March 15, 1987 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Maple syrup is the only natural native-American sweetener. It can be argued that it is the only native flavoring. The Iroquois were regularly tapping sugar maples for their sap by the time the first colonists arrived in New England. It flavored most of their dishes, from porridge to roasted game. They even used blocks of maple sugar for currency. Soon the colonists began tapping the maple reserves in their forests rather than importing honey bees from Europe. For one thing, it was cheaper.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
They say it's an acquired taste, but for those who enjoy real maple syrup on pancakes or waffles, the flavor is hard to beat. And if that maple tree in the back yard looks ripe for tapping, Ted Groff says that now is the time that the sap is flowing. "Usually from late February until March, the sap that has been stored in the tree is ready to flow," said Groff, park naturalist for Central Park, a 1,200-acre park south of Lancaster. "For the past 12 years, we have tapped the same 15 trees to show visitors how to get syrup from maple trees," he said.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Maple Sugar Weekend, complete with demonstrations and storytelling, will take place at two Montgomery County sites, Mill Grove/Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary and Green Lane Reservoir Park Nature Center. Mill Grove's activities are scheduled from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow. Green Lane Reservoir Park will hold Sunday's events from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Activities at both sites will include demonstrations of the maple process from sap to syrup, as well as stories about the history and folklore of the process.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
While it may be too early to seriously think about spring, an annual rite heralding the approach of that season is about to take place at Springton Manor Farm in Glenmoore. From early February until late March, the clear sticky sap from sugar maple trees is ready to flow into waiting buckets and then be boiled into maple syrup. And at the 10th annual Maple Sugar Festival on March 7, visitors will learn how to unlock this sugary treat from centuries-old trees that line "Maple Lane" on the grounds of the Chester County Parks and Recreation Department's demonstration farm.
FOOD
February 21, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the heart of Germantown, we're salivating for sap, the precious, watery liquid that drips and dribbles out of maple trees and, with considerable effort, is transformed into magical maple syrup. We're at Wyck, the 18th-century house with a rose garden, a market farm, and most important, a stand of 70-foot sugar maples. "It's maple-syrup time," says Christina Moresi, Wyck's educator and leader of our unlikely urban sugaring party, which includes Elizabeth Belk, Wyck's horticulturist, and Jeff Eckel, the caretaker and beekeeper.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
1 quart ripe strawberries 2 tablespoons maple syrup or other sweetener 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1. Wash, hull, and cut strawberries into 3 or 4 pieces each. 2. Add lemon juice and maple syrup. Mix gently. From the kitchen of Giuliana and Bob Pierson Per serving (based on 6): 49 calories, 1 gram protein, 12 grams carbohydrates, 9 grams sugar, trace fat, no cholesterol, 2 milligrams sodium, 2 grams dietary fiber.
FOOD
April 11, 1990 | By Peter Wynne, Special to The Inquirer
This is sap season, and for weeks now, country folk in some of the colder parts of the nation have been getting themselves steamed up over something more than taxes and the high cost of feed. From Maine to Wisconsin, south to Virginia and Indiana, grown men and women have been tromping around in the snow, poking holes in the trees and playing with fire. It's not early spring fever, however; these good people are pursuing an old and very American tradition: They're making maple syrup.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | By Maralyn Lois Polak
Before I bought a house, I had an apartment so leaky it was like living in a carwash. Those soggy times came to mind one recent midnight, thanks to the Blizzard of '96, when my very expensive, recently installed stamped tin kitchen ceiling begins leaking. Like too many of us in these days of melt, freeze, melt, freeze, I had three feet of snow with nowhere to go on a flat roof. Expecting the worst - a leak leads to a hole leads to a flood - I rushed to my basement for my trusty zinc bucket spattered by cement and clambered double time back up the stairs, where a steady PLUNK/PLUNK/PLUNK articulated the wintry heartbeat of my house.
LIVING
February 28, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One recent Friday, Chuck Katzenbach Jr. pulled on four or five warm flannel shirts, picked up an electric drill, and headed out into the cold. That day was the beginning of about six weeks of daily, finger-numbing, teeth-gritting work for the 51-year-old custom-home-and-furniture builder. Here, on 26 acres of forested property he shares with his wife and 87-year-old father, Katzenbach drilled 225 two-inch holes with a 7/16-inch bit into more than 200 sugar and red maples - a weeklong task he performed with a brace-and-bit drill until last year.
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NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
EVERY APRIL for the past five years, Bob Abel has entered the Dewey Beach Chili Cook-off in Delaware. And every year, the Secane, Delaware County, resident has taken home the People's Choice Award. It's a heated competition. Abel says the spice extends to the quips and jabs that cooks share over their bubbling pots. "We butt heads, but underneath it all there's a lot of camaraderie. We really love doing this and look forward to it. " The Chili Cook-off is a family affair, too. His son, Brian, and daughter-in-law, Lisa, encouraged him to enter the first time with an adaptation of his father's recipe.
FOOD
February 21, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the heart of Germantown, we're salivating for sap, the precious, watery liquid that drips and dribbles out of maple trees and, with considerable effort, is transformed into magical maple syrup. We're at Wyck, the 18th-century house with a rose garden, a market farm, and most important, a stand of 70-foot sugar maples. "It's maple-syrup time," says Christina Moresi, Wyck's educator and leader of our unlikely urban sugaring party, which includes Elizabeth Belk, Wyck's horticulturist, and Jeff Eckel, the caretaker and beekeeper.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
SCHMEAR IT What to eat: Most popular menu items are the Loxsmith (cream cheese, chopped lox, scallions, tomatoes and cucumbers, recommended on an everything bagel) and the Stuffed French Toast (cream cheese, strawberries, bananas, walnuts, cinnamon and maple syrup on a French toast bagel). Both were scarfed in nanoseconds by our taste-testers. Wait, there's more: Other sweet or savory combos also intrigued, like the Monster Miler (peanut butter, bananas and granola, recommended on a blueberry bagel)
NEWS
January 10, 2014
* Stuff yourself with pancakes, sausage and maple syrup, then head out into the crisp winter woods to see how maple syrup is made at Tyler Arboretum's annual Pancake Breakfast and Maple Sugaring Celebration, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 22 (515 Painter Rd., Media, 610-566-9134, ext. 208, TylerArboretum.org ). Hot cocoa and coffee also fuel this journey through the 650-acre arboretum. $12 adults, $6 ages 3-12 and free under 3. Snow date is March 1. * Beck's Kitchen Pantry condiments and spices are now available at Whole Foods Markets in the 'burbs.
FOOD
April 26, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
This is the seventh in a series on healthy cooking classes at St. Martin De Porres School in North Philadelphia. The girls were so thrilled to see chicken thighs and drumsticks that they temporarily lost their minds. "Are we making fried chicken?" Hope Wescott asked breathlessly. "Sorry," I said. "Not in a class about healthy cooking. " In truth, I did test a version of oven-baked "fried" chicken - dipping it in yogurt and rolling it in smashed corn flakes - and it wasn't bad. But, honestly, it wasn't nearly as good as true fried chicken.
FOOD
April 25, 2013
Makes 5 servings 10 bone-in chicken             thighs and    drumsticks, skin          removed ½ cup Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic, minced ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ teaspoon oregano 1.    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Rinse the chicken and pat dry with paper towels. 2.    Combine the mustard, garlic, maple syrup, and oregano in a small bowl. 3.    Spread the mustard mixture evenly on top of each chicken thigh or drumstick, being careful to cover as much of the surface as possible to form a crust.
FOOD
March 7, 2013
Makes 6-8 servings 2 poblano chiles 4 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons oil 2 onions, diced 5 pounds butternut squash    (2 medium, or 1 large),    peeled, seeded and cut into          1/2-inch cubes 1/3 cup dry white wine 6 cups vegetable broth 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon New Mexico chile powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup maple syrup, divided 1/2 cup raisins, coarsely    chopped 6 to 8 pieces stale bread,    preferably dark whole-grain,    coarsely chopped 1 cup heavy cream Fine sea salt Tabasco sauce, optional 1 bunch green onions, thinly    sliced on the bias 1. Roast the poblano chiles over high heat on a rack over a stove-top burner.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
It's almost the New Year, and as you may know, I don't like to make conventional resolutions, because that requires me to think about how much I suck. Who needs it? Too negative. Instead, every new year, I prefer to make unresolutions. I think about the things I like about myself and resolve to keep doing them. As in, I resolve to keep kissing my dogs on the lips. I can't be the only middle-aged woman with puppy breath. And this year, I have one big unresolution, which is to continue to dream about harebrained schemes to make money.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
SHAWNEE-ON-DELAWARE - With the fog still thick over the Delaware River, Gov. Corbett, joined by about a dozen state officials, all in kayaks, pushed off from the Pennsylvania side Friday morning for a 10-mile float downriver. It was Day Two of Corbett's 23-mile paddle along the Delaware, meant to promote tourism and highlight Pennsylvania's natural resources. "Hey, look at that," said Corbett, briefly breaking the silence on this undisturbed stretch of the middle Delaware in the 70,000-acre Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
1 small tart apple 1 cup slightly stale white bread, crusts removed, cut into small pieces 1½ tablespoons melted butter 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon Heavy cream or vanilla ice cream for garnish   1. Peel and core apple and cut into chunks. Heat a couple of tablespoons of water in a small heavy pot and toss in the apple. Lower the heat, cover and cook, stirring a few times, for about five minutes or until apples are soft.
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