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Marathon Man

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
For those who still tremble at what the Nazi dentist did to Babe's teeth in Marathon Man, fear not. There isn't a dentist in Brothers, the sequel, by William Goldman (Warner Books, $4.95). However, there are enough creeps, sadists, perverts, killers, secret-agency sociopaths, killings, bombings, double crosses and general nefariousness to make you crawl back to your favorite toothsmith and beg his forgiveness for your ever doubting him. If you read Marathon Man, you figured secret agent/killer Doc was dead.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Ghanasyam "Sam" Adhikari was an athlete in his youth. At Jadavpur University in his native Calcutta, he excelled in cricket, soccer, and volleyball, and he captained both the soccer and volleyball squads. But there was friction between him and his soccer coach. Though Adhikari hustled on the field, he hated to run. He especially loathed running laps after practice. Little could he have imagined at the time that he would undergo a late-life transformation into a long-distance runner.
SPORTS
June 29, 1997 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Ben Witter gets older, he finds it more difficult to recover from his annual golf marathons, held to benefit cancer research in his home area of Lebanon, Pa. His back hurts. His swing tempo, speeded up to finish as many holes as possible, is a mess. Witter himself is a cancer survivor, however, and he cherishes the opportunity to conduct the marathons. When he reflects on what he experienced 10 years ago, a few aches and pains after more than 15 hours and 245 holes of golf are a minor inconvenience.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Carin T. Ford, Special to The Inquirer
Robert Schwelm wasn't planning on running in the Boston Marathon this year. During the last few months, he has been concentrating on improving his time for 10-kilometer (6.2-mile) runs. He has been working with a coach, adhering to a steady schedule of track work for speed and long-distance runs for strength. But then a weatherman reported there would be a tail wind during the marathon on April 18, and Schwelm thought he had a chance of running a really good time. His hunch was correct.
SPORTS
January 22, 1999 | By John Manasso, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What sort of toughness does Bishop Shanahan's Dan Karabin have? Well, he attended school on Wednesday so he could play in a basketball game. He was out Tuesday and yesterday. Playing while sick is one thing. On Nov. 23, Karabin appeared sluggish in practice. Aware that the 6-foot-4, 180-pound junior center was the fastest and strongest player on his team, coach Dan McManus inquired as to what was wrong. McManus didn't know that, just the day before, Karabin had run in the Philadelphia Marathon.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | By David Lieber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There goes the Marathon Man. Round and round he runs. Inside the prison yard at Graterford. Three laps to a mile. Mile after mile. Day after day. Year after year. Stan Rosenthal, 34, isn't really going anywhere. He's in a race without a finish line, a convicted murderer serving a sentence of life without parole. Almost every day, Marathon Man, as other inmates call him, runs beneath the barbed-wire fence, along the inside of the tall, gray walls. Always under the watchful eyes of grim guards up in the towers and the other inmates in the yard, involved in their team sports of football and basketball and volleyball.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
"Pleasure is an easy thing, happiness is not" is the comforting moral of Max Ophuls' Le Plaisir (1951), an omnibus film each episode of which is derived from a Guy de Maupassant short story. A movie that makes light of the beastliness of the belle epoque, Le Plaisir is a Gallic romp, its best sequence involving a brothel owner who closes up shop so that she and her gals (who include the incomparable Danielle Darrieux) can attend the first communion of the madam's niece. Tonight and Saturday night at 7 and 9:15, Film Forum/Philadelphia, 509 S. Broad St. $3.50; $2.50 members and full-time students.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
One of the enduring tragedies of fair Ireland, beset by recurring economic woes, is that it loses many of its best and brightest, who, in search of opportunity, emigrate, most often to the United States. A sterling example of this brain drain is Garret FitzGerald, who was born in Dublin, and came here the first time at age 18 to take a summer job driving a Coca-Cola truck. Since then, he has risen fast and far. After earning his medical degree at University College in Dublin, FitzGerald eventually returned to the United States and during the 1980s ran the clinical pharmacology division at Vanderbilt University.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Heat," an adventure drama starring Burt Reynolds, Karen Young, Peter MacNicol, Howard Hesseman, Neill Barry and Diana Scarwid. Directed by R.M. Richards. Screenplay by William Goldman, based on his novel. Running time: 99 minutes. A New Century/Vista release. At area theaters. Once, not very long ago, William Goldman was perhaps the hottest screenwriter in Hollywood. Not only was he hailed for the quality of such scripts as "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "Marathon Man" and "All the President's Men," he got big bucks for them, thus achieving an extremely rare blend of art and commerce.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
With a final chant of some suitably mumbled jumbo, the priest of the occult religion cuts the head off a chicken, spattering blood over two reluctant witnesses. If nothing else, the ritual in the middle of The Believers reminds us that the impact of a supernatural thriller is all a matter of execution. Whenever a front-rank director - and John Schlesinger certainly qualifies - ventures into the scary supernatural world, there is always keen anticipation and keener disappointment when the effort doesn't come off. It's true with The Believers, just as it was, for example, with the The Shining - watching the shotgun marriage of Stanley Kubrick's genius with the lowly material of that movie was rather like eating popcorn in a cathedral.
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NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Ghanasyam "Sam" Adhikari was an athlete in his youth. At Jadavpur University in his native Calcutta, he excelled in cricket, soccer, and volleyball, and he captained both the soccer and volleyball squads. But there was friction between him and his soccer coach. Though Adhikari hustled on the field, he hated to run. He especially loathed running laps after practice. Little could he have imagined at the time that he would undergo a late-life transformation into a long-distance runner.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
In the first minutes of a quick sitdown with Dustin Hoffman , the sprightly icon of 20th-century cinema - The Graduate , Marathon Man , Kramer vs. Kramer , All the President's Men , Midnight Cowboy , Rain Man , Tootsie (come on, this is ridiculous!) - manages to reference Ireland, James Joyce , Ulysses , waiting tables, Henri Cartier-Bresson , and tortoise- shell glasses. The publicist warns that you have only 10 or 15 minutes tops with Hoffman, who, at 75, has just directed his first feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
One of the enduring tragedies of fair Ireland, beset by recurring economic woes, is that it loses many of its best and brightest, who, in search of opportunity, emigrate, most often to the United States. A sterling example of this brain drain is Garret FitzGerald, who was born in Dublin, and came here the first time at age 18 to take a summer job driving a Coca-Cola truck. Since then, he has risen fast and far. After earning his medical degree at University College in Dublin, FitzGerald eventually returned to the United States and during the 1980s ran the clinical pharmacology division at Vanderbilt University.
SPORTS
June 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS - This, then, is who John Isner is for now: The Marathon Man of Tennis, the guy who plays and plays and plays, for hours on end, until the last set seems interminable. At Wimbledon 2 years ago, he won 70-68 in the fifth, the longest set and match in tennis history. At Roland Garros on Thursday, as afternoon gave way to evening, the 10th-seeded American lost, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 4-6, 6-3, 18-16, to Paul-Henri Mathieu, of France, in the second round, a 5-hour, 41-minute test of stamina and attention span.
SPORTS
May 5, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
The Blue Cross Broad Street Run has been around long enough that a history refresher is timely for newcomers to Sunday's 10-mile race. After serving as a guiding force in getting the Philadelphia Distance Run up and running in the late 1970s, Gene Martenson turned his attention to the Broad Street Run. Martenson worked with Bill Broom, then the director of public affairs for Philadelphia Newspapers, Inc., to bring runners to Broad Street on...
SPORTS
January 22, 1999 | By John Manasso, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What sort of toughness does Bishop Shanahan's Dan Karabin have? Well, he attended school on Wednesday so he could play in a basketball game. He was out Tuesday and yesterday. Playing while sick is one thing. On Nov. 23, Karabin appeared sluggish in practice. Aware that the 6-foot-4, 180-pound junior center was the fastest and strongest player on his team, coach Dan McManus inquired as to what was wrong. McManus didn't know that, just the day before, Karabin had run in the Philadelphia Marathon.
SPORTS
July 4, 1998 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Goran Ivanisevic dropped to his knees, put his hands to his bandannaed head and bellowed something - who knows what? - in Croatian. Then he hurled his tennis racket deep into the stands of Wimbledon's Centre Court. The emotions of the moment, the elation, the exhaustion, the absolute incredibility, collided in his head to make that scream loud and long. Ivanisevic beat Richard Krajicek, 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-7 (5-7), 15-13, yesterday in a men's semifinal at Wimbledon that was the bravest match of his most glorious and horrendous career.
SPORTS
October 5, 1997 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was Curt Schilling, firing baseballs until his arm felt like manicotti in the '93 World Series. He was David Cone, almost collapsing from exhaustion in the '95 playoffs. He was Orel Hershiser, twirling and twirling and twirling some more nearly every day in October of 1988. He was Jeff Fassero, one-man rescue squad for the Seattle Mariners. He was Jeff Fassero, warrior. He was Jeff Fassero, marathon man. This, he said, was "the biggest day of my life. " And no one was going to make him give up the baseball yesterday - if he had to throw 150 pitches, 160 pitches, a thousand pitches.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1997 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
After the requisite "Where to, pal?", New York cabbie Jerry Fletcher (Mel Gibson) switches the meter on and regales his fares with wild rants about the insidiousness of fluoridation (it "weakens your will, makes you a slave of the State"), about stealth helicopters snooping on pedestrians, about the "festering scab" that is the Vatican, and the stockpile of Nobel scientists' sperm (collected at gunpoint) stashed beneath the skating rink at Rockefeller Center. Hey, what's one more nutball New York City taxi driver?
SPORTS
June 29, 1997 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Ben Witter gets older, he finds it more difficult to recover from his annual golf marathons, held to benefit cancer research in his home area of Lebanon, Pa. His back hurts. His swing tempo, speeded up to finish as many holes as possible, is a mess. Witter himself is a cancer survivor, however, and he cherishes the opportunity to conduct the marathons. When he reflects on what he experienced 10 years ago, a few aches and pains after more than 15 hours and 245 holes of golf are a minor inconvenience.
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