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NEWS
June 12, 2005 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tony Trezza, a Valley Forge sculptor, looks at a large block of white marble and knows there is an image in there that he wants to extract. "You go after it . . . carefully," said Trezza, who has learned the craft of sculpting marble from the masters in Pietrasanta, Italy. Wearing an apron and glasses to protect against the flying white chips and spray of dust in his studio, Trezza demonstrated how he uses his air hammer to refine an abstract piece that he calls the "clamdigger.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Tourists pocketed marble fragments that had flown off Michelangelo's statue David when a failed Italian artist attacked it with a hammer on Saturday, the superintendent of Florence's art works said today. Pietro Cannata, 47, broke a toe of the 13-foot-high statue in the Tuscan city's Galleria dell'Accademia. Superintendent Antonio Paolucci said two Italians and a French tourist picked up some of the marble pieces and made for the exit but were stopped by security guards and forced to empty their pockets.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, it was an auto-repair business that Renato Sacco wanted for his garage on Mount Carmel Avenue in the North Hills section of Abington Township. He went before the township's Zoning Hearing Board and was granted permission. Alas, it didn't work out. So now Sacco has new plans: He wants to use the garage to store marble imported from Italy. Sacco appeared before the Zoning Hearing Board Monday night, this time seeking permission to lease the 34-by-50-foot garage to Joseph D. Giungo Sr., who imports and installs marbles in churches and other commercial buildings.
NEWS
September 18, 1996 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Clothing fashions change from season to season and year to year. So what clothing should a sculptor drape his subjects in when he is fashioning a marble carving designed to appeal to viewers hundreds of years from now? To give his figures a timeless quality, George Carr decided on loose, flowing garments that have a vaguely classical look. "One of the architects calls it 20th-century peasant," he said with a smile. "I think it turned out all right. " Carr, of Silver Spring, Md., is sculpting a huge marble bas-relief that will be installed in 1998 in the main chapel at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1988 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Penn Center office buildings have been refitted with Italian marble to enable them to better compete with the sumptuous trappings of the new crowd of office towers rising west of City Hall. Last week, the completion of a $9 million, two-year renovation at Two Penn Center Plaza was celebrated. A two-story glass pavilion has extended the lobby 20 feet into the plaza behind the building, and the lobby's green marble walls have been covered with dark blue and light blue Italian granite.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
All right, gardeners and marble experts. Here's a reader in need of advice (I'd try but I haven't gotten many tomatoes this year and my sills are wood). Question: I have a tomato garden. I put the tomatoes on my marble windowsills in my kitchen. I went away for a few days and forgot about the tomatoes. When I returned, the tomatoes were overripe and mushy. The acid from them etched marks in the marble. I have tried different things, but nothing is working. I stopped in a tile store and they told me I would have to get someone out who restores marble.
NEWS
December 19, 2004 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Mark Oxman has followed a personal course as a sculptor for decades with art that is fascinatingly eccentric and individual. With the return of interest in sculpting and painting the human figure, his work, on exhibit at Rosemont College, may be considered "in style" right now, but it is really not stylish and never has been. Actually Oxman, a longtime teacher at the American University in Washington and former teacher at Haverford, is a traditionalist (but not stodgy) who reveres the old masters.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
When a truly great piece of Americana turns up at auction, it is difficult to predict how high the price will go. A case in point is the whopping $594,000 paid late last month for a marble-top pier table in the classical style. The price was double the presale estimates and nearly twice the previous record for a piece of classical furniture, the $303,000 paid in January 1987 for a secretaire a abattant. The pier table, which is supported by two carved and gilded winged figures, was made in New York about 1815 by Charles Honore Lannuier.
NEWS
January 16, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sue Romanyszyn grabs the attention of her sixth-grade students with hands-on projects such as building robots and designing tracks to race marbles. "They're always learning, but don't realize they are - not till the end," said Romanyszyn, a teacher at the Klinger Middle School and a finalist for a Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics. Romanyszyn, who has taught at the Upper Southampton school for seven years, will find out in April whether she is one of the 50 state winners of the award, administered by the National Science Foundation for the White House.
NEWS
June 19, 2005 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tony Trezza, a Valley Forge sculptor, looks at a large block of white marble and knows there is an image in there that he wants to extract. "You go after it . . . carefully," said Trezza, who has learned the craft of sculpting marble from the masters in Pietrasanta, Italy. Wearing an apron and glasses to protect against the flying white chips and spray of dust in his studio, Trezza demonstrated how he uses his air hammer to refine an abstract piece that he calls the "clamdigger".
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 7, 2013
Spare a marble? As a project for our Temple University course, my fellow students and I were asked to develop solutions for those living on the streets. Our contribution isn't to offer the homeless shelter or a change of clothes, but rather a simple cup of coffee. At local coffee shops, we're promoting a concept in use in Europe known as "suspended coffee. " With the agreement of shop owners, customers who buy an item at full price can opt for purchasing a "suspended" good at half price, for which the customer receives a marble to drop into a jar. Then, homeless individuals can walk into the coffee shop, take a marble from the jar, and receive one free item per day as long as there is a marble available.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD - There was a hush as Emily Cavacini lined up the shot. The 11-year-old steadily eyed the final target, a navy blue marble glinting in the afternoon sun, then knocked it out of the ring with her shooter marble. An instant later, the freshly minted girls' division champion in the 90th annual National Marbles Tournament, a sixth grader from the Pittsburgh area, was swarmed by supporters, who soaked her with water in celebration. Emily's win also marked the conclusion of a four-day event that epitomized the wholesome image that Wildwood officials have said in recent weeks they want this resort city to project.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Phil and Victoria Kluss will be getting the last word on tomato stains on marble this week, only because their solution is so interesting, and they sent me before and after photos to boot. "We got out the color by making a poultice with food grade diatomaceous earth and hydrogen perioxide," the Klusses wrote. "Mix them together so you have a thick paste, cover the stain and then cover with plastic wrap until the mixture dries out. " Question: I have blue stone/slate floors in my kitchen.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Tomatoes on windowsills and radiator covers dominate this week's discussion. A reader put tomatoes on the marble windowsill in her kitchen, and went away for a few days. When she returned, the tomatoes were overripe and mushy, and the acid from them etched marks in the marble. She requested a reasonably priced fix. Before I offer solutions from other readers, I should mention, as Deborah Kates, the vice president of the Coatesville Area Art Alliance, reminded me, that a "sunny sill is the worst place to let tomatoes ripen.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
All right, gardeners and marble experts. Here's a reader in need of advice (I'd try but I haven't gotten many tomatoes this year and my sills are wood). Question: I have a tomato garden. I put the tomatoes on my marble windowsills in my kitchen. I went away for a few days and forgot about the tomatoes. When I returned, the tomatoes were overripe and mushy. The acid from them etched marks in the marble. I have tried different things, but nothing is working. I stopped in a tile store and they told me I would have to get someone out who restores marble.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Eric W. Herr, For The Inquirer
There's so much to see in and around our nation's capital, but often so little time to take it all in. To be sure, the White House, the Capitol, and the Smithsonian museums, along with the monuments, tend to top most itineraries. But, with a bit of research and some planning, you can also get in plenty of other fascinating stops. Here are a few.   The Newseum Located on Pennsylvania Avenue at Sixth Street NW on the National Mall, this striking $450 million glass-and-stone structure that opened in 2008 chronicles nearly five centuries of news history.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
"[T]hey've reaffirmed a fundamental principle that here in America — in the wealthiest nation on earth — no illness or accident should lead to any family's financial ruin. " — President Obama, on the Supreme Court ruling that upheld the Affordable Care Act, his signature health-care reform. • "This day will go down in history as the day when Americans lost a part of their freedom — the freedom to choose what to buy with their own money. " — Karen Harned, director of the Small Busines Legal Center at the National Federation of Independent Business, one of the groups that challenged the health-care law's constitutionality.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | Al Heavens
Question: I am a victim of my own creativity. Several years ago I put a faux marble finish on my basement floor and covered it with a polyurethane. I would like to repaint it. I tried just floor paint. The paint never dried. I mopped it off several days later. The paint adviser at Lowe's recommended paint remover or sanding. Do you think epoxy paint would cover it? All other options seem like a lot of work. Answer: On the one hand, I like to hear that a product - in this case, the polyurethane - is doing its job by protecting your faux floor.
SPORTS
December 5, 2011 | Associated Press
Play it again, LSU and Alabama. The No. 2 Crimson Tide (.9419) edged out No. 3 Oklahoma State (.9333) in the final round of voting and will play the top-ranked Tigers in an all-SEC BCS National Championship Game on Jan. 9 in New Orleans. It's not exactly a rematch the public was clamoring for - at least outside of Southeastern Conference territory. And it certainly will do nothing to quiet the critics of the Bowl Championship Series or the calls for a college football playoff.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Two online auctions ending this weekend will offer stay-at-home bidding on a variety of collectibles, including coins - and toy banks to put them in. The coins, plus some currency, will be offered by the Auction House Inc., formerly Audubon's Auctioneers, at a sale where online bidding has already begun at www.Auctionzip.com . Live bidding will start at 11 a.m. Saturday at the gallery at 100 W. Merchant St. in Audubon, N.J. The 70...
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