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Marcel Duchamp

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NEWS
October 29, 1987 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lucio Pozzi hurriedly slipped into his black leotard, the one he'd bought at Capezio in New York and customized with a hood, blinders and a zipper in man's most critical spot. Like many an office worker, the bald and slightly paunchy man was running late. So he grabbed his lunch - four apples, four organic hard-boiled eggs (the kind you buy at health-food stores), a loaf of bread and a gallon of water - and an empty grapefruit-juice bottle in case he had to use his zipper and cheerfully said, "See you tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Beatrice Wood, who is closing fast on her 95th birthday, reminisced not long ago about the twin passions of her life, pottery and men. "I'm the kind of woman who likes to fall in love," she admitted. "I always fall like a ripe olive. " Wood has been throwing pots for more than 50 years, but she has been falling in love far longer. She has learned, she said, that in love as in pottery, one never knows how things are going to turn out. "My kiln treats me the way men have treated me," she quipped, "but I still keep trying at my age, even with the men. " One of her loves was Marcel Duchamp, perhaps the only one who didn't leave her emotions in tatters.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Composer John Cage - whose centenary is being celebrated this year - was a frequent presence at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the Anne d'Harnoncourt years. The point of entry was 20th-century revolutionary Marcel Duchamp, whose art influenced Cage and is strongly represented at the museum. This fall, the Art Museum once again rolls the dice on Duchamp and Cage in "Dancing Around the Bride: John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Marcel Duchamp. " The show will feature more than 100 paintings, stage sets, musical notations, and sculptures that explore philosophical connections among the quintet of artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2009 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
When ?tant donn?s first went on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1969, so many people thronged to see Marcel Duchamp's enigmatic final work that lines unspooled out of the gallery, down the corridor, and, if legend is to believed, on outside the museum. Why? Because only one viewer at a time can see the work in its entirety via two small peepholes. "We actually tripled our attendance that year because of it," said Michael R. Taylor, curator of modern art and of the current Duchamp exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
If there are any Marcel Duchamp fans among delegates to this summer's Republican National Convention here, they're going to be disappointed. The Philadelphia Museum of Art's 20th-century wing, including its preeminent collection of Duchamp's art, closed down quietly several weeks ago, and will remain closed through October. The galleries devoted to Duchamp and sculptor Constantin Brancusi are the highlights of the 20th-century wing, which is undergoing renovation and upgrading of its electrical, lighting and climate-control systems.
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has acquired five major French paintings - a late Cézanne view of Mont Sainte-Victoire, a Manet still life of fruit, a landscape and a cityscape by Pissarro, and a portrait of a young girl by Berthe Morisot - all as a bequest from long-time museum supporter Helen Tyson Madeira, who died last year. In addition, the museum has received two early portraits by Marcel Duchamp, of the parents of his lifelong friend, Gustave Candel, donated by Candel's daughter, Yolande Candel.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Contrary to popular belief, Japan's most significant video export to America isn't the VCR. It's Shigeko Kubota, the 50-year-old video-art pioneer who carried a Porta-pak as her diary and found TV monitors a medium as malleable as clay. The playful video "sculptor" (the placement of her monitors is as critical as the work they display) is in Philadelphia today and tomorrow as a celebrant in the "Pertaining to Duchamp" series sponsored by Temple University's Tyler School of Art. Kubota will speak tonight at 7:30 at the Painted Bride Art Center and tomorrow at 7:30 at International House, where she will talk about her video installation sculptures, many of them homages to Marcel Duchamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1987 | By Martha Hewson, Special to The Inquirer
What does Marcel Duchamp have in common with the Grateful Dead? Devoted fans, says Anne Schuster, curator of a new exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art marking the centennial of the French dadaist's birth. "A lot of people live and die by Duchamp. His fans are incredibly avid. His centennial was bound to be important. " And it's especially important at the museum, which Schuster calls "the shrine" for Duchamp fans. The museum has "the largest collection of his major works in the world.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
In 1914, Marcel Duchamp created a sculpture by the simple act of renaming a circular metal rack used to dry bottles. Three years later he scandalized the New York art community by submitting a porcelain urinal, which he titled Fountain, to an exhibition. Duchamp's "appropriation" of ordinary objects has since become common practice. His bottle rack and urinal have inspired several generations of "readymades" - mundane objects transformed into art by an artist's proclamation - and collages and assemblages made from discarded materials.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | by Paul Mullin
Yes, it's shocking, disturbing, even infuriating, but is it art? An exhibition across the Atlantic has reignited the infamous fight over the line between art and its commoner cousin, sensationalism. A Royal Academy of Arts show in London titled, candidly enough, "Sensation," includes a huge portrait of a convicted child killer made from children's tiny handprints and a glass box containing a rotting cow's head complete with live flies and maggots. Indeed, the only overarching theme binding the works seems to be shock value.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has acquired five major French paintings - a late Cézanne view of Mont Sainte-Victoire, a Manet still life of fruit, a landscape and a cityscape by Pissarro, and a portrait of a young girl by Berthe Morisot - all as a bequest from longtime museum supporter Helen Tyson Madeira, who died last year. In addition, the museum has received two early portraits by Marcel Duchamp, of the parents of his lifelong friend, Gustave Candel, donated by Candel's daughter, Yolande Candel.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
As a teenager in southern New Jersey, Pat Steir would skip school to travel to Philadelphia, specifically to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. "I did it so often - sitting on the floor, spreading my books out on the floor, looking at the artwork, eating apples - that after a while the guards didn't even chase me away," recalled Steir, now 74, in an oral history for the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. One early influence was Marcel Duchamp,...
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
An exhibition like the current "Dancing Around the Bride" had to happen eventually at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which holds the largest and most important collection anywhere of art by Marcel Duchamp. Its premise is simple, and hardly a surprise encounter, given that its essential truth has been known for decades. Duchamp was one of the most influential artists of the last 100 years. Among those he influenced directly were two important visual artists, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg; a dancer and choreographer, Merce Cunningham; and a composer, John Cage.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Though Dove Bradshaw's art is all about chance, change, and indeterminacy, it's no accident that her one-person show at Larry Becker Contemporary Art, "Copper, Silver, Fool's Gold" coincides with "Dancing Around the Bride," the current Philadelphia Museum of Art exhibition examining Marcel Duchamp's interactions and exchanges with John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jasper Johns. The first artist to influence Bradshaw was Duchamp, whose Bicycle Wheel she first saw at the Museum of Modern Art when she was 14. In 1969, while a student at the Boston Museum School of Art, Bradshaw hung a bicycle wheel sideways from the ceiling of her studio as a perch for two live doves that a friend had given her; she then put a Zen archery target on the floor directly beneath the wheel, simultaneously referencing herself, Duchamp, and Johns.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Composer John Cage - whose centenary is being celebrated this year - was a frequent presence at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the Anne d'Harnoncourt years. The point of entry was 20th-century revolutionary Marcel Duchamp, whose art influenced Cage and is strongly represented at the museum. This fall, the Art Museum once again rolls the dice on Duchamp and Cage in "Dancing Around the Bride: John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Marcel Duchamp. " The show will feature more than 100 paintings, stage sets, musical notations, and sculptures that explore philosophical connections among the quintet of artists.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Andy Warhol died on George Washington's birthday 25 years ago from complications of gallbladder surgery. Having survived a near-fatal shooting 19 years before that, he had by then become a legendary figure in the international art world, as famous as Picasso, if not more so. It's not surprising, then, that his reputation not only hasn't diminished, as most posthumous reputations do, but actually has appreciated, along with the value of his art. ...
NEWS
February 23, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
"I think," said Michael R. Taylor, flashing a bright smile, "I'm going to take a little break now. " It's not that he's haggard from pulling together the Philadelphia Museum of Art's next big exhibition, Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris, which opens tomorrow with more than 200 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. In fact, the Picasso extravaganza has been immensely satisfying, a kaleidoscopic coda to 2009, Taylor's annus mirabilis, during which art and its public presentation and discussion poured out of him in tidal flows.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2009 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
When ?tant donn?s first went on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1969, so many people thronged to see Marcel Duchamp's enigmatic final work that lines unspooled out of the gallery, down the corridor, and, if legend is to believed, on outside the museum. Why? Because only one viewer at a time can see the work in its entirety via two small peepholes. "We actually tripled our attendance that year because of it," said Michael R. Taylor, curator of modern art and of the current Duchamp exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2008 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Isn't blue the signature color of summer? Of blueberries, delphiniums, swimming pools, moods, sultry music? It seems as good a reason as any why Larry Becker Contemporary Art decided to organize its summer group show of paintings around that particular hue, in all its infinite variations. But there's more to it, apparently. The exhibition's title, "To Be Looked at ... " was borrowed from the one Marcel Duchamp gave to his enigmatic glass construction, To Be Looked at (from the Other Side of the Glass)
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