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Marcel Duchamp

NEWS
October 2, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
You spill your wastebasket onto the floor. And what have you got? A work of art, that's what. If you find that hard to believe, check out the exhibit titled "Joseph Cornell/Marcel Duchamp: In Resonance" opening Thursday at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. One work in that exhibit consists of 117 discarded items, including postcards, dry-cleaning receipts and assorted scraps that were piled into a box. As it happens, these scraps belonged...
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Michael R. Taylor, the highly regarded curator of modern art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, has been named director of the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College. He will assume his new position in August, succeeding Brian Kennedy, who moved to the Toledo Museum of Art in September. Taylor, who was named the Art Museum's first modern art curator in 2004, said in a statement that he was "absolutely delighted" with his new position. The Hood's collection, he said, offered "exciting possibilities," particularly in the area of "student-driven exhibitions, which I believe hold the key to the museum's future success.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Ann Temkin, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, has been appointed curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, effective Oct. 1. Temkin, hired by the Art Museum in 1987 as an assistant curator, became head of the department then called 20th-century art in 1990. Sept. 25 will be her last day in that job. She said yesterday that it would be exciting to help MoMA figure out, "both from a conceptual and practical point of view," how to present the museum's matchless collection of modern art in its new building, now under construction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Guitarist John Fahey - drifter, recluse, some say sorcerer - does for the blues, folk and other American primitive idioms what Marcel Duchamp did for nudes descending staircases. His celebrated playing illustrates the concentric circles of motion and being. Though Fahey has been hailed as one of the great finger-style guitarists of the 20th century, over his itinerant 40 years of music-making he has been riddled with the bite marks of as many mythical hellhounds on his trail as any Delta bluesman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In contemporary art, context is all. Marcel Duchamp proved that definitively by exhibiting an ordinary urinal and demanding that we regard it as sculpture rather than as a utilitarian bathroom fixture. The context of Frozen, which involves a fatalistic performance artist in contemporary China, is rather more elusive. This profoundly troubling and pseudonymously made (for political reasons) film focuses on a Beijing artist who carefully plans his final work: suicide. Not by pills or blade, but by ice. He contrives to bury himself under a block of ice and die of hypothermia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Charles Dutoit, the Philadelphia Orchestra's summer music director, returned to the Academy of Music last night to begin his winter guest engagements. His program opened boldly with Edgard Varese's Arcana, which Leopold Stokowski and this orchestra introduced to the world 63 years ago, and which, given a few more performances, has the makings of a signature piece for the Philadelphians with Dutoit. The world still doesn't know Arcana well, which is likely one reason it still makes such a dazzling impression; another is its catapulting energy despite its considerable metallic and percussive weight.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
John Sculley has packed a lot into his 46 years. After getting his M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School in 1963, he soon connected with Pepsi-Cola - and worked his way up to president and chief executive officer. Tonight at 11, he will talk to Larry King about personal computers on WIP (AM/610). Sculley is currently president and CEO of giant Apple Computers. Through the magic of tape, he also will appear twice tomorrow at 3 p.m. - with Harry Gross on WCAU (AM/1210)
NEWS
August 19, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two "interdisciplinary" creative projects scheduled to be performed in Philadelphia have received matching grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. NEA's Inter-Arts Program has awarded $25,000 to the American Music Theater Festival to create, develop and produce Jacob's Room, a collaborative effort by composer Morton Subotnick, opera and music theater designer Robert Israel and director Wesley Balk. A grant of $7,000 has been awarded to four artists in various disciplines to adapt Large Glass, Marcel Duchamp's complex assemblage at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, into a performance linking music, movement, language and architecture.
NEWS
June 2, 2003 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Over the weekend, longtime Philadelphia dance maker Melanie Stewart produced five kinetically intelligent works at the Drake Theater under the title DanceHouse: 2003. Dancer/choreographer Paule Turner first invited Ashley Lecille Suttlar up from Virginia Commonwealth University, where she was a student, to dance in Court's production of Medea last year. The vivid, compact Suttlar also danced at the Fringe Festival in two solos, one of which she repeated here. With unrelated yet seamless movements, her 10-minute "Serotonin" blurred one image into the next, ending with a bodybuilder pose that rapidly morphed into an arabesque.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage has announced nearly $1.8 million in grants in recent weeks for exhibitions and local heritage projects. The Pew Exhibitions Initiative, an arm of the center, will be providing more than $1.1 million for exhibitions and planning by seven organizations. The Institute of Contemporary Art received $250,000 for the first major museum show devoted to Los Angeles installation artist Jason Rhoades, who died in 2006. The Michener Art Museum received $250,000 toward mounting "Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism.
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