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NEWS
July 25, 1994 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Crowds flocked to Penn's Landing over the weekend for the Hispanic Fiesta sponsored by the Council of Spanish Speaking Organizations. The rhythms of salsa, mariachi and merengue music filled the air, and foods from Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Argentina filled visitors' stomachs. Other events included a Pan American Children's Pageant and a Parade of Flags representing Latin American countries. Hand-crafted items, jewelry and souvenirs were sold at booths.
FOOD
May 4, 1994 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emperor Napoleon III's troops were marching to Mexico City in 1862. In Puebla on May 5, Mexican forces, led by Gen. Ignacio Zaragoza, made a stand. The French backed off. May 5, Cinco de Mayo, is a national holiday, and Zaragoza is a hero, even though French reinforcements eventually made their way to Mexico City. It was the thought that counted. The celebration makes its way north of the border. There will be a free festival on Penn's Landing from 6 to 9 p.m. tomorrow, with mariachi bands and food for sale.
NEWS
October 24, 2005 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
It is no secret that Mexican singer Luis Miguel is one of the most popular entertainers in the Spanish-speaking world - and one of the world's most successful singers, in terms of record sales, period. He certainly has the credentials. Known in Mexico as "El Sol" (The Sun), Luis Miguel is just as much a marketing brand as he is a performer. With blond hair, green eyes, a blinding, perfect smile, and a background in acting as well as singing, his influences come as much from performers such as Frank Sinatra as they do Julio Iglesias.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania, For The Inquirer
If Calexico were a movie instead of a band, it would be Orson Welles' Touch of Evil – a taut, arty thriller set in a Southwestern border town, full of long shadows and obtuse angles, where evil wears a badge, good men die like dogs, and everyone gets what's coming to him or her in the end. For going on 16 years, Calexico has been trafficking a brand of indie rock aptly described as desert noir - a distinctive blend of spicy mariachi flourishes, campfire...
NEWS
November 1, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The triple bill of indie oddities Calexico, Black Heart Procession, and Destroyer at the Theatre of Living Arts on Wednesday was a study in the liabilities of shticky originality. Calexico and Black Heart - two well-respected bands that have, in their own ways, sought to upgrade rock as we know it - offered a redundant night of full-contact atmospherics. But it was the quirky Destroyer, relegated to a short, early set, that succeeded in making a bold statement. It's a wonder that anyone actually has to write Calexico's Tex-Mex soundscapes, whose formulaic, assembly-line presentation of surf guitar, flamenco rhythms and mariachi horns would not sound out of place in a family restaurant or theme park.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Certainly there are bands named after characters in movies - Duran Duran from Barbarella, Klaatu from The Day the Earth Stood Still, and Heaven 17 from A Clockwork Orange to start. But no act shares the accuracy of character to band as does Margot & the Nuclear So and So's, which has a flawless connection to namesake Margot Tenenbaum, the moody and suicidal sister in The Royal Tenenbaums, Wes Anderson's 2001 movie. The eight-piece packed the First Unitarian Church on Tuesday, making cluttered chamber- pop in which clanging noises and many voices, harmonious and discordant, seemed to come from everywhere at once.
NEWS
July 11, 2005 | By Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carmen Vazquez does it every year. With a red-and-white umbrella above her head and a cooler at her feet, Vazquez sits dead center in front of the Penn's Landing stage and soaks in hours of salsa, samba and mariachi. She first came to the Hispanic Fiesta when her adult son was 6 months old. Vazquez, a 46-year-old Kensington nurse, now brings her grandchildren. All around yesterday's festival of Latino culture, music and food, routines of this kind could be found among the hundreds gathered on the Delaware River waterfront.
NEWS
August 13, 1990 | By Jason Johnson, Daily News Staff Writer
Although the second annual International Philadelphia Music Festival gathered performers from far and wide, it was mostly the opportunity to celebrate in an Hispanic surrounding that pleased participants. "I have not been able to see the groups really well, but I can hear them. It's a nice atmosphere here, everything is fun and the people are nice. " said Damaris Rodriguez of North Philadelphia yesterday. Held Saturday and yesterday from noon until 8 p.m. in the park at Hunting Park Avenue and 9th Street, the non-profit festival was organized by Eduardo Sempertegui.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There weren't any five- or 10-dollar blackjack or craps tables at the Trump Taj Mahal Saturday night. Stakes were higher than that at this lavish casino. That could have been because The Donald had reportedly paid a half-million dollars to Luis Miguel, the Puerto Rican-born, Mexican-based Latin pop song superstar who sang for his cena at the Mark G. Etess Arena. Whether the casino made back its investment is unknown. But it can be said that Luis Miguel, as well as the approximately 50 musicians who backed him, worked hard for those 500Gs.
NEWS
June 25, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If Dave Matthews was irked by the Flaming Lips' upstaging him at his own festival - the Dave Matthews Band Caravan, which debuted Friday with 14 bands at Bader Field in Atlantic City - the amiable jam band kingpin sure didn't show it. But then, Matthews, who led the DMB through a two-hour headlining set highlighted by a solo take on Procol Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale," had plenty of other reasons to be pleased. For starters, Bader Field proved to be an ideal venue for the three day Caravan, scheduled to wind up on Sunday with a full slate of bands, including Philadelphia acts Amos Lee and Dr. Dog. The orange orb setting over Matthews' left shoulder as he took the stage with "Don't Drink The Water" provided the opening day's picture postcard moment.
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TRAVEL
May 12, 2014 | By Lauren Rodia, For The Inquirer
Going on vacation always wakes up the adventurer in me; I want to try new things and seize life one tourist trap at a time. On a recent trip to Cozumel, Mexico, it was with this mind-set that my good friend and I set out to find this experience. As a seasoned vacationer, I knew what sort of day to expect. There would be shopping for souvenirs that were cheap and made of somewhat questionable materials. There would be snorkeling. But more important, there would be free margaritas at the local bar for any patron over the tender age of 13. After having one (free!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania, For The Inquirer
If Calexico were a movie instead of a band, it would be Orson Welles' Touch of Evil – a taut, arty thriller set in a Southwestern border town, full of long shadows and obtuse angles, where evil wears a badge, good men die like dogs, and everyone gets what's coming to him or her in the end. For going on 16 years, Calexico has been trafficking a brand of indie rock aptly described as desert noir - a distinctive blend of spicy mariachi flourishes, campfire...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012
Justin Townes Earle "Hear my father on the radio, singing . . . " Thus Justin Townes Earle begins his fourth album, Nothing's Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now . That's not the only time Steve Earle is alluded to in the 10-song set. Not that the son is trying to ride the father's coattails. Since his 2008 debut, the younger Earle has authoritatively established his own musical identity. This time, young Earle brings in some horns to add a Memphis soul feel to his Americana.
NEWS
June 25, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If Dave Matthews was irked by the Flaming Lips' upstaging him at his own festival - the Dave Matthews Band Caravan, which debuted Friday with 14 bands at Bader Field in Atlantic City - the amiable jam band kingpin sure didn't show it. But then, Matthews, who led the DMB through a two-hour headlining set highlighted by a solo take on Procol Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale," had plenty of other reasons to be pleased. For starters, Bader Field proved to be an ideal venue for the three day Caravan, scheduled to wind up on Sunday with a full slate of bands, including Philadelphia acts Amos Lee and Dr. Dog. The orange orb setting over Matthews' left shoulder as he took the stage with "Don't Drink The Water" provided the opening day's picture postcard moment.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Certainly there are bands named after characters in movies - Duran Duran from Barbarella, Klaatu from The Day the Earth Stood Still, and Heaven 17 from A Clockwork Orange to start. But no act shares the accuracy of character to band as does Margot & the Nuclear So and So's, which has a flawless connection to namesake Margot Tenenbaum, the moody and suicidal sister in The Royal Tenenbaums, Wes Anderson's 2001 movie. The eight-piece packed the First Unitarian Church on Tuesday, making cluttered chamber- pop in which clanging noises and many voices, harmonious and discordant, seemed to come from everywhere at once.
NEWS
October 24, 2005 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
It is no secret that Mexican singer Luis Miguel is one of the most popular entertainers in the Spanish-speaking world - and one of the world's most successful singers, in terms of record sales, period. He certainly has the credentials. Known in Mexico as "El Sol" (The Sun), Luis Miguel is just as much a marketing brand as he is a performer. With blond hair, green eyes, a blinding, perfect smile, and a background in acting as well as singing, his influences come as much from performers such as Frank Sinatra as they do Julio Iglesias.
NEWS
July 11, 2005 | By Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carmen Vazquez does it every year. With a red-and-white umbrella above her head and a cooler at her feet, Vazquez sits dead center in front of the Penn's Landing stage and soaks in hours of salsa, samba and mariachi. She first came to the Hispanic Fiesta when her adult son was 6 months old. Vazquez, a 46-year-old Kensington nurse, now brings her grandchildren. All around yesterday's festival of Latino culture, music and food, routines of this kind could be found among the hundreds gathered on the Delaware River waterfront.
NEWS
November 2, 2003 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso FOR THE INQUIRER
Being from the South, I tasted true Mexican food only once growing up. The softer side of the cuisine, Tex-Mex, is what I was raised to love. So it was a pleasant surprise to discover the authentic dishes at El Sarape, a homage to co-owner Luis Marin's native Mexico City. The first thing you need to know about El Sarape is this: Eventually, the mariachi player will leave your table side and move to someone else's. Don't get me wrong - he's a mood-setter. With walls covered in black-and-white photos of Mexico and a happening tequila bar, El Sarape is a festive place for lunch or dinner.
NEWS
November 2, 2003 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On Saturday, the community that calls itself "Everybody's Home Town" will host Jazz Fest by Night, a mix of live band sounds from around the country and globe. South-of-the-border rhythms, by Synthesis Latin Band, will be one of the choices offered by 10 musical groups performing at 10 borough restaurants from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jazz Fest, a first for the borough, follows the Blues Stroll held in June and the Americana/Roots Ramble held in April, said Zubair Khan, executive director of the Media Business Authority.
NEWS
November 1, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The triple bill of indie oddities Calexico, Black Heart Procession, and Destroyer at the Theatre of Living Arts on Wednesday was a study in the liabilities of shticky originality. Calexico and Black Heart - two well-respected bands that have, in their own ways, sought to upgrade rock as we know it - offered a redundant night of full-contact atmospherics. But it was the quirky Destroyer, relegated to a short, early set, that succeeded in making a bold statement. It's a wonder that anyone actually has to write Calexico's Tex-Mex soundscapes, whose formulaic, assembly-line presentation of surf guitar, flamenco rhythms and mariachi horns would not sound out of place in a family restaurant or theme park.
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