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Marian Anderson

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not true what they say about first impressions - when you see the opening of Welcome Home, Marian Anderson, with an actress talking at you about a key moment in her life, it seems like another formulaic one-woman show. But Welcome Home quickly reveals itself: It's a story told by three actors in deft portrayals, and anything but formulaic. The show, which opened Thursday at Bristol Riverside Theatre, is a well-stitched account of the singer from South Philadelphia and her rise to acclaim.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The groundbreaking African American singer Marian Anderson was born and raised in Philadelphia, so it is fitting that the city's Arden Theatre Company should present a show about her. My Lord, What a Morning, by Kim Hines, did not originate locally, though. It was commissioned and premiered by the Kennedy Center in Washington, which also is appropriate. For it was an event there - her famous 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial, a landmark event in the civil rights movement - for which Anderson will be forever remembered.
NEWS
January 7, 2005 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
When members of Marian Anderson's Union Baptist Church in South Philadelphia held a benefit concert to help pay for her private singing lessons, the advertisements included her photograph and the caption, "Come and hear the baby contralto, 10 years old. " Who in the audience would imagine that, later in her career, Anderson (1897-1993) would add "soprano" and "baritone" to her repertoire and become among the greatest classically trained contraltos of the 20th century? Anderson, who will be honored with a 37-cent commemorative stamp Jan. 27 in the Black Heritage Series, was born in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 10, 2004 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
More than 100 stamps - on subjects ranging from modern architecture, the Muppets and the civil-rights movement to Marian Anderson, Henry Fonda and Arthur Ashe - are included in the preliminary 2005 program, the U.S. Postal Service has announced. All of the commemoratives are 37 cents, though the Postal Service may add some definitives during the year. Not all precise dates or first-day-of-issue cities have been determined. The tentative schedule: January: opera contralto Marian Anderson, in the black heritage series, in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC Former Inquirer staff writers Burr Van Atta and Steve Neal contributed to this article
Marian Anderson, the South Philadelphia singer whose dramatic 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial was a milestone in the American civil rights movement, died yesterday in Portland, Ore. Her death came a day before the 54th anniversary of that historic concert. Published references gave her birthdate as 1902, making her 91 at the time of her death. Miss Anderson had suffered a stroke last month at the Portland home of her nephew, James DePreist, music director of the Oregon Symphony.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Isaac Stern said The Lady From Philadelphia should be "celebrated - not commemorated. " And celebrated Marian Anderson was, in song and glorious singing, last night at Carnegie Hall. Her own voice poured forth in the spiritual "Deep River," a 1928 recording that opened the eloquent program celebrating the 100th anniversary of the late contralto's birth. The velvety sonorities rolled as the young Anderson's profile was projected within the gilt moldings of the Carnegie's stage wall.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, the Washington Post, the New York Post and USA Today
A new sickle-cell anemia treatment-and-research center, named for South Philadelphia operatic great Marian Anderson, will be dedicated on Jan. 20 at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. The singer's nephew, James De Preist, in town to conduct the Philadelphia Orchestra, said his aunt had lent her name to the unit because of "the humanitarian status of the project, because she feels the center will be helpful to a lot of people, and because she hopes that her name may be catalytic in gaining support for it. " De Preist, a Central High grad, is spending Thanksgiving with Anderson at her Danbury, Conn.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By ACEL MOORE
When I was a boy growing up in South Philadelphia my heroes, for the most part, were athletes like Joe Louis and Jackie Robinson. But high on my list was a woman who grew up in South Philadelphia in a rowhouse on a street a short walk from where I grew up. She was not an athlete but a superb musician, a diva whose singing career was nurtured in a black Baptist church choir. Her contralto voice was so pure and rich that it inspired great prose and acclaim from world renowned critics and classical music lovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
ON EASTER SUNDAY, April 9, 1939, Marian Anderson stepped up to a battery of microphones in front of Washington, D.C.'s, Lincoln Memorial, sang "America," and altered American history. Wearing a mink coat and an orange-and-yellow scarf on that chilly afternoon, she changed the final phrase from "Of thee I sing" to "TO thee WE sing. " This modest African-American contralto had taken the train from her South Philadelphia rowhouse that day with her mother and sisters. Forbidden to stay at any Washington hotel due to segregation, they'd been promised lodging with former Pennsylvania Gov. Gifford Pinchot.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, it was the voice of Marian Anderson that moved the crowd most profoundly yesterday at a memorial service for the world-famous singer at Union Baptist Church in South Philadelphia. More than 200 people went to the religious service remembering Anderson, who was born and raised here and died April 8 at the age of 96. Many spoke passionately - including her nephew, conductor James Anderson DePreist - but none carried the power of 10 recorded hymns in Anderson's own voice.
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NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Philanthropists John and Leigh Middleton are recipients of the 2013 Philadelphia Award, the venerable honor established in 1921 by Ladies' Home Journal editor Edward W. Bok. The Middletons - whose family business, tobacco and cigar maker John Middleton Co., was sold in 2007 for $2.9 billion - have largely directed their philanthropy to education, homelessness, and workforce development projects. Among the more notable beneficiaries of their largesse are the Philadelphia School District, Philadelphia Academies, the Philadelphia Youth Network, Teach for America, and Penn Medicine's Neuroscience of Behavior Initiative.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Alexandra Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he plays with his youth orchestra in front of more than 300 people, 13-year-old Max Chambers of Berwyn isn't nervous. He's done this a lot, he says, looking every bit the professional despite his age, in a white button-down and black dress pants. Max sits in the first chair of the second violin section of the Musicopia String Orchestra, which played on Sunday at the Benjamin Britten Festival Concert at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul. Since he was 9, Max has known that he wants to spend his life playing the violin.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
'My dream was to make some music and get some girls," says Berry Gordy Jr. "My bar was low. As I went on, new doors kept opening. I exceeded my wildest dreams. " He pauses for a moment. It's been a very good year for the founder of Motown Records, who will be 84 on Nov. 28. Since his jukebox autobiography's debut on Broadway in April, Motown The Musical has made $45 million. In June, the Songwriters Hall of Fame honored him with its pioneer award. Earlier this month, he received Ebony magazine's Lifetime Achievement Award.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Over his 30-year career, Bobby McFerrin has explored the full range of the human voice. Best known for his 1988 pop-philosophy novelty hit "Don't Worry, Be Happy," McFerrin has performed in symphony halls and on jazz stages, winning 10 Grammy Awards and collaborating with the likes of Yo-Yo Ma, Chick Corea, Quincy Jones, and Wynton Marsalis. With his new album, Spirityouall , McFerrin returns to his roots with a collection of spirituals and traditional songs inspired by his deep Christian faith and by his father, Robert McFerrin Sr., a pioneering opera singer and interpreter of Negro spirituals.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Berry Gordy, the 83-year-old founder of Motown Records, the Detroit label that became a hit-making factory and produced such stars as Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross, Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, and Michael Jackson, is the recipient of the 2013 Marian Anderson Award, Mayor Nutter announced Monday. The award, given to "artists and individuals whose body of work has improved the world beyond the power to entertain," is named for the late African American contralto and South Philadelphia High graduate who was celebrated as a singer of both classical music and spirituals in her lifetime.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
THE MOST RECENT recipients of the Marian Anderson Award are actress Mia Farrow in 2011, actor and comedian Bill Cosby in 2010, author Maya Angelou and screenwriter Norman Lear in 2008, actor Richard Gere in 2007 and actor Sidney Poitier in 2006. No award was given in 2009. n
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