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NEWS
January 13, 2013
Margaret Brewer, 82, a retired brigadier general who was the first woman to hold that rank in the Marine Corps and who led the Marines' public affairs division late in her career, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease Jan. 2 at a retirement community in Springfield, Va. Gen. Brewer joined the Marine Corps in 1952 and held a variety of roles in officer recruiting and training, personnel management, and public affairs before she was made a...
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOB HIGGINS is coming home. After 63 years, the remains of the young Fishtown soldier, who was captured in a bloody battle at the height of the Korean War in 1951, will be returned here for proper ceremony and burial. His remains will arrive at Philadelphia International Airport from Hawaii on Thursday. A military escort will accompany the coffin to St. Ephrem Catholic Church in Bensalem for the funeral on Saturday. The escort will then accompany the coffin to Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown, Bucks County, for burial with full military honors.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At boot camp, they endured snakes, mosquitoes, substandard housing, and intense physical training. In the South Pacific, they faced the Japanese. Yet, through World War II and beyond, these 19,000 black men also confronted segregation and racism to serve as U.S. Marines. They are the Montford Point Marines, named for the segregated facility where they were trained in North Carolina from 1942 until 1949. This spring, these first black Marines - about 400 who are still alive - will be honored at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center in Washington with the Congressional Gold Medal, the country's highest civilian honor for distinguished achievement.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
WASHINGTON - The Marine Corps said yesterday that it is investigating a video depicting what appears to be four Marines urinating on the corpses of Taliban fighters. In a statement, the Marine Corps said it has not verified the origin or authenticity of the YouTube video. But it also said the actions portrayed are not consistent with Marine values. If verified, the video could create a strong backlash in the Muslim world and beyond for the disrespectful actions it portrays.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012
DEAR ABBY: This is in response to the "Worried Mom," whose son was not allowed to re-enlist in the Marine Corps. That young man knew when he got those tattoos he would not be able to re-enlist. The U.S. Navy (which the Marine Corps "technically" falls under) passed the New Enlistment Tattoo Policy in January 2003, with the Marine Corps adding its policy in April 2007. - Spouse of Retired Navy CPO DEAR SPOUSE: You are correct. Many readers wrote to say the Navy had passed new tattoo policies in 2003 and the Marine Corps followed suit in 2007.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN CAREY SIMS was drafted into the Marine Corps in 1943, the last thing he wanted to hear were the words - probably of a well-meaning drill sergeant - "I'm going to make you a good Marine!" For one thing, he had to leave his high school sweetheart, Martha Brown. For another, he knew, or shortly discovered, that the Marines didn't want him. There was no way a black man could train with the Marines at Parris Island or Camp Lejeune, which turned out the "few good men" whom the Marines bragged about producing.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LITTLE GIRL could coax a smile from Tim Gill even when he had none left. She'd seen Gill, a Philadelphia firefighter who served in Iraq with the Pennsylvania National Guard, sprint to the sink, doubled over with nausea. She whispered when Gill's headaches came and tiptoed during his bad dreams, but he remained the man she adored most. A few days before the funeral, she drew a picture of Gill, a stick figure sticking out its tongue, smiling for her one last time. "DADDY," 4-year-old Amanda Gill wrote above the figure's head.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Woodstown High School in Salem County, Derek Kerns wasn't sure what he wanted to do with his life. He seemed a "little directionless," principal Scott Hoopes said. Kerns "had his ups and downs," said Christopher Snyder, the assistant principal. "He was a skinny kid with long, shaggy, red hair and relaxed, slouchy gait. " All of that changed in 2008 after Kerns graduated and entered the Marine Corps. The young man who returned to the school after boot camp at Parris Island, S.C., bore little resemblance to the one who left.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
David P. Loughran, 81, a retired Marine Corps colonel and a lawyer who served for a time as the Mantoloking, N.J., prosecutor, died Wednesday at Kindred Hospital in Devon of complications from a stroke. He was 81. Born in Philadelphia, Col. Loughran was the son of Jane Hookey Loughran and Edward Paul Loughran. The family lived in Mount Airy, and he attended Penn Charter School. The 10th of 11 children, he attended Lafayette College. While there, he joined the Marine Corps, later qualifying as a naval aviator and completing advanced carrier qualification in 1953.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A series of miscommunications, poor guidance, and soldiers' decisions to take "the easy way instead of the right way" resulted in the burning of Qurans and other religious books at a U.S. base in Afghanistan early this year, according to the findings of a military investigation released Monday. The U.S. military said six Army soldiers escaped criminal charges but received administrative punishments for their involvement in the Quran burning, which roiled relations with Afghans.
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NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After his first wife, Marie, died in 1992, Henry Saia lived alone for 13 years. Mr. Saia had retired in 1980 as a clothing factory manager in South Jersey and later became financial director for St. Mary Church and its school in Williamstown. "The church gave him a parking spot with his name on it," his son Thomas said, "and one day after Mass, a lady his age was standing there. " She introduced herself, now a widow, as the Elizabeth Schaeffer with whom he had been friends in a grammar school in Cedar Brook.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kerry Walters Jr. might not be attending the University of Pennsylvania without the help of the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation. It would have been too costly. His family's finances were stretched thin, partly because his father, a Marine, was wounded during the Vietnam War and his earning ability was affected by deteriorating health. But the foundation came to the rescue, as it has for nearly 33,000 others since it was established in 1962. It provides Walters $2,500 a year, over and above other grants and financial aid. "By lifting some of my financial burden, the scholarship has allowed me to worry a bit less about financing my education and has given me more time and energy to dedicate towards school," said Walters, 25, a sophomore and mathematics major who grew up in Chaska, Minn.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOB HIGGINS is coming home. After 63 years, the remains of the young Fishtown soldier, who was captured in a bloody battle at the height of the Korean War in 1951, will be returned here for proper ceremony and burial. His remains will arrive at Philadelphia International Airport from Hawaii on Thursday. A military escort will accompany the coffin to St. Ephrem Catholic Church in Bensalem for the funeral on Saturday. The escort will then accompany the coffin to Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown, Bucks County, for burial with full military honors.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Robert M. Rossetti could not wait to become a Marine. "At Frankford High School, he did not graduate," daughter Peggy Ciccone said. "He falsified his birth date so that he could go into the Marine Corps because he wanted to fight in World War II," she said. He was only 16. He got his wish. From September to November 1944, Mr. Rossetti fought alongside the Marines who routed the Japanese from the South Pacific island of Peleliu. "What he told me was he was very lucky," said Bill Darling, a friend of 40 years.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was almost home free. On his 23d birthday in 1967, Marine Lt. Ron Castille was leading a platoon on a search-and-destroy mission in Duc Pho, South Vietnam, when he was hit in the leg by a Viet Cong machine-gun round and evacuated from the fight. For a moment, it seemed he was on his way to the safety of the rear. But just as the Marine helicopter bearing Castille was clearing the battle zone, a burst of enemy fire raked the thin metal skin of its fuselage, tearing another and much more serious wound in his leg. Military surgeons said they had no choice but to amputate.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Laura McCrystal, and Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writers
In one of the region's deadliest shooting rampages, an Iraq war veteran shot and killed his ex-wife and five of her relatives early Monday, terrorizing four upper Montgomery County communities and sparking a manhunt that continued deep into the night, officials said. The suspect, Bradley W. Stone, 35, of Pennsburg, had a "familial relationship" with all of the victims, officials said. Besides his ex-wife, he allegedly killed her mother, grandmother, sister, brother-in-law, and niece.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roy Scarfo, 88, of Downingtown, an artist whose illustrations of outer space captured the imagination of Americans from the 1960s on, died Monday, Dec. 8, of pancreatic cancer at the VA Medical Center in Coatesville. Mr. Scarfo's first illustrations came to the attention of the public in 1957 when they were published by his employer, General Electric. He spent 16 years as creative art director for GE's Space Technology Center, which opened in 1961 in Valley Forge. At the same time, he became a space art consultant and illustrator for Sun Co., NASA, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Senate, and others.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even now, almost 45 years later, Al Dandridge can still hear the mortar and gun fire, picture the searing chaos of battle. It was a perhaps-ill-conceived coin toss that led Dandridge to join the Marine Corps with childhood friend Christopher Billups. Billups had always wanted to be a Marine, and he insisted Dandridge go with him. Dandridge said no. So they flipped a coin. Dandridge lost. Sometime later, Dandridge, who will take over Jan. 1 as the new chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association, found himself in Vietnam.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward F. Crawford Sr., 86, of Drexel Hill, a decorated U.S. Marine Corps officer, died Sunday, Oct. 26, of complications from a stroke at home. A chief warrant officer-3 known to his buddies as "Gunner," Mr. Crawford retired from the Marine Corps Reserve in 1985 after serving for many years. As an infantry unit leader during the Vietnam War, he was wounded twice and awarded two Purple Hearts. "His funeral will be attended by Marines coming in from all over the country. He is so widely respected by the Marine Corps," said Bill Rafferty, a family friend and fellow military man. The Marine Corps tradition runs in the Crawford family.
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