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NEWS
January 13, 2013
Margaret Brewer, 82, a retired brigadier general who was the first woman to hold that rank in the Marine Corps and who led the Marines' public affairs division late in her career, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease Jan. 2 at a retirement community in Springfield, Va. Gen. Brewer joined the Marine Corps in 1952 and held a variety of roles in officer recruiting and training, personnel management, and public affairs before she was made a...
NEWS
January 12, 2012
WASHINGTON - The Marine Corps said yesterday that it is investigating a video depicting what appears to be four Marines urinating on the corpses of Taliban fighters. In a statement, the Marine Corps said it has not verified the origin or authenticity of the YouTube video. But it also said the actions portrayed are not consistent with Marine values. If verified, the video could create a strong backlash in the Muslim world and beyond for the disrespectful actions it portrays.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012
DEAR ABBY: This is in response to the "Worried Mom," whose son was not allowed to re-enlist in the Marine Corps. That young man knew when he got those tattoos he would not be able to re-enlist. The U.S. Navy (which the Marine Corps "technically" falls under) passed the New Enlistment Tattoo Policy in January 2003, with the Marine Corps adding its policy in April 2007. - Spouse of Retired Navy CPO DEAR SPOUSE: You are correct. Many readers wrote to say the Navy had passed new tattoo policies in 2003 and the Marine Corps followed suit in 2007.
NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time this week, the Pentagon delivered good news to 6,200 workers at Boeing Co.'s Delaware County helicopter plant despite looming cuts to U.S. defense spending. Two days after receiving a $4 billion contract to build 177 CH-47F Chinook helicopters at its Ridley Township factory, Boeing said Thursday that the Navy had signed off on a $6.5 billion, five-year contract for 99 V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. Boeing builds the Osprey - whose 20-year development has included crashes that have killed about 30 people - in a 50-50 joint venture with Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. Boeing builds the fuselage, which is shipped to Bell in Amarillo, Texas, for final assembly.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A series of miscommunications, poor guidance, and soldiers' decisions to take "the easy way instead of the right way" resulted in the burning of Qurans and other religious books at a U.S. base in Afghanistan early this year, according to the findings of a military investigation released Monday. The U.S. military said six Army soldiers escaped criminal charges but received administrative punishments for their involvement in the Quran burning, which roiled relations with Afghans.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At boot camp, they endured snakes, mosquitoes, substandard housing, and intense physical training. In the South Pacific, they faced the Japanese. Yet, through World War II and beyond, these 19,000 black men also confronted segregation and racism to serve as U.S. Marines. They are the Montford Point Marines, named for the segregated facility where they were trained in North Carolina from 1942 until 1949. This spring, these first black Marines - about 400 who are still alive - will be honored at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center in Washington with the Congressional Gold Medal, the country's highest civilian honor for distinguished achievement.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Julie Watson, Associated Press
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. - The Marine Corps has created its first law enforcement battalions - a lean, specialized force of military police officers that it hopes can quickly deploy worldwide to help investigate crimes from terrorism to drug trafficking and train fledgling security forces in allied nations. The Corps activated three such battalions last month. Each is made up of roughly 500 military police officers and dozens of dogs. The Marine Corps has had police battalions off and on since World War II but they were primarily focused on providing security, such as accompanying fuel convoys or guarding generals on visits to dangerous areas, said Maj. Jan Durham, commander of the 1st Law Enforcement Battalion at Camp Pendleton.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Gregory A. McAdams, 77, of Haddon Heights, who earned a Distinguished Flying Cross during a 21-year career as a Marine Corps pilot, died of heart failure Thursday, Jan. 28, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. McAdams, who retired in 1982 as a lieutenant colonel, earned among other honors a presidential unit citation and a Republic of Vietnam meritorious unit citation. He then joined the Boeing Co. in Ridley Township, where in 2000 he retired as a senior manager for business development of the V-22 Osprey, a military aircraft that can take off like a helicopter.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
David P. Loughran, 81, a retired Marine Corps colonel and a lawyer who served for a time as the Mantoloking, N.J., prosecutor, died Wednesday at Kindred Hospital in Devon of complications from a stroke. He was 81. Born in Philadelphia, Col. Loughran was the son of Jane Hookey Loughran and Edward Paul Loughran. The family lived in Mount Airy, and he attended Penn Charter School. The 10th of 11 children, he attended Lafayette College. While there, he joined the Marine Corps, later qualifying as a naval aviator and completing advanced carrier qualification in 1953.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A TOUR in Afghanistan didn't kill Timothy Loper, but trying to break up a fight outside a Camden bar did. Loper, a Marine who grew up in Gloucester Township, Camden County, had gone to a party at the 20 Horse Tavern near the Camden waterfront and tried to intervene when he observed a fight in the parking lot at 2:46 a.m. Sunday, authorities said. Shots were fired and Loper, married with a 6-year-old daughter, was struck multiple times, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said yesterday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Richard T. Weirauch "was a life saver for my choir," said Robert G. Hamilton, former director of the Philadelphia Boys Choir and Chorale. Especially on its annual foreign tours, Hamilton said, "Dick preceded me and would tell those who were behind the scenes what we needed, when we needed it. " Hamilton, who retired in 2004, said, "Without Dick, I don't know what I would have done. " Mr. Weirauch was doing it all, Hamilton said, during his vacations, as a volunteer. On Sunday, March 6, Mr. Weirauch, 79, of Delran, a United Refrigeration Inc. sales manager whose career began there in 1961, died of cancer at home.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Gregory A. McAdams, 77, of Haddon Heights, who earned a Distinguished Flying Cross during a 21-year career as a Marine Corps pilot, died of heart failure Thursday, Jan. 28, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. McAdams, who retired in 1982 as a lieutenant colonel, earned among other honors a presidential unit citation and a Republic of Vietnam meritorious unit citation. He then joined the Boeing Co. in Ridley Township, where in 2000 he retired as a senior manager for business development of the V-22 Osprey, a military aircraft that can take off like a helicopter.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
HOW MANY business owners are asked to take a position with their labor union? The fact that Edward E. Gardiner, president of the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Wilkes-Barre, was asked to serve as a trustee of Teamsters Local 401, which represented his employees, was indicative of how he and his fellow executives treated their workers. "Edward became known for his disciplined and fair business practices, and for his profound respect for his workers," his family said. Edward Ernst Gardiner, a direct descendant of the founder of the Schmidt Brewing Co., a Marine veteran, a master craftsman and a woodworker, and a devoted family man, died Dec. 26 after having a joyful Christmas with his family.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A Marine sergeant whose unexplained disappearance shortly before Christmas prompted an extensive search of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst was found dead Saturday, the base reported. Sgt. Tristan Clinger's body was found "in the ranges of the installation," a spokeswoman said Monday, adding that the cause of death was under investigation. He was 28. The spokeswoman, Staff Sgt. Katherine Tereyama, declined to identify the cause of death because of the investigation. On Dec. 20, Clinger's wife reported to police that her husband, a mechanic with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 722, had walked off the base about 4 p.m. and had not returned.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Football was a passion for Bernard Grabowski. He played it as a youth and was a lifelong fan of the Eagles, seeking out the team even after he retired to North Carolina a few years ago, and finding it there on TV at a local bar. In a double helping of Philly nostalgia, the place also served cheesesteaks. Mr. Grabowski, 75, a member of Riverside High School's Football Hall of Fame and a resident of King of Prussia before he and his wife moved to North Carolina in 2010, died Friday, Nov. 20, of cancer at his home in Brevard.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EDDIE HENDERSON liked nothing better than to tool around the Philly streets in one of his big Cadillacs to check out the scene. He would always be impeccably dressed, starting with his Stetson hat and descending to his well-matched outfits. Caddies were among Eddie's hobbies, along with bicycle riding, operating remote control cars, or harkening to some old-time rhythm and blues. He was also an enthusiastic line dancer, dabbled in art and enjoyed getting together with lifelong pals.
NEWS
September 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK LEVISTER had a passion for helping people, especially those in dire straits. He worked with the homeless in Philadelphia, and his job with the state Department of Welfare was to make sure that nursing homes were doing their job helping others in need. James Franklin Levister Sr., a 21-year employee of the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare who later worked for two of the nursing homes he monitored, died Aug. 23 of multiple health complications at the age of 68. Frank was a Marine veteran of the Vietnam War. Although his family didn't know what happened to him there, it was obvious that he saw combat because among his decorations was the Purple Heart for wounds.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After his first wife, Marie, died in 1992, Henry Saia lived alone for 13 years. Mr. Saia had retired in 1980 as a clothing factory manager in South Jersey and later became financial director for St. Mary Church and its school in Williamstown. "The church gave him a parking spot with his name on it," his son Thomas said, "and one day after Mass, a lady his age was standing there. " She introduced herself, now a widow, as the Elizabeth Schaeffer with whom he had been friends in a grammar school in Cedar Brook.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOB HIGGINS is coming home. After 63 years, the remains of the young Fishtown soldier, who was captured in a bloody battle at the height of the Korean War in 1951, will be returned here for proper ceremony and burial. His remains will arrive at Philadelphia International Airport from Hawaii on Thursday. A military escort will accompany the coffin to St. Ephrem Catholic Church in Bensalem for the funeral on Saturday. The escort will then accompany the coffin to Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown, Bucks County, for burial with full military honors.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kerry Walters Jr. might not be attending the University of Pennsylvania without the help of the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation. It would have been too costly. His family's finances were stretched thin, partly because his father, a Marine, was wounded during the Vietnam War and his earning ability was affected by deteriorating health. But the foundation came to the rescue, as it has for nearly 33,000 others since it was established in 1962. It provides Walters $2,500 a year, over and above other grants and financial aid. "By lifting some of my financial burden, the scholarship has allowed me to worry a bit less about financing my education and has given me more time and energy to dedicate towards school," said Walters, 25, a sophomore and mathematics major who grew up in Chaska, Minn.
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