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Marine Mammals

NEWS
April 14, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney and Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It looks as if he's Canadian. Researchers from Quebec believe the 12-foot beluga whale that has lost his way on the Delaware River is one of their own, a male named Helis. Identifiable by a large gash on his back near his dorsal ridge, the snow-white Helis (pronounced ell-EE) was first spotted in 1986 among belugas that make their home near the St. Lawrence River, Quebec's Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals said yesterday. The Canadian government even gave him a number: DL 018. The whale swam back and forth on the Delaware yesterday, thwarting marine-mammal monitors who trailed behind him in motorboats, trying to will the whale to swim back out to sea. He drew crowds of delighted schoolchildren and businesspeople at riverfront parks from Beverly in Burlington County to north of Tullytown in Bucks County.
NEWS
August 12, 2007 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The only organization in New Jersey authorized by the state to rescue distressed marine mammals may close in three years if local officials decide there is a more valuable use for the waterfront property it leases from the city. The Marine Mammal Stranding Center, home to scientists who help wrong-way whales in the Delaware River and newborn seals that crawl onto highways, established a venerable marine veterinary-care center 22 years ago on land leased from the city for $1 a year.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
When a young Bob Schoelkopf was working as a marine animal trainer 34 years ago at an aquarium on Atlantic City's Steel Pier - and despising how the creatures were kept in captivity - his "aha moment" came when a dying whale washed up on the beach and he was asked to care for it. There was no one else to call. In the two days that Schoelkopf sat nursing the animal before it died, he formulated a plan for a kind of antiaquarium to respond to marine mammal strandings up and down the coast.
LIVING
May 26, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
After spending 10 years in obscurity and near-poverty rescuing the stranded whales, seals and sea turtles that wash up on the Jersey shore, Bob Schoelkopf suddenly became an environmental celebrity last summer. The outspoken director of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center put in two months of 20-hour days literally up to his elbows in dead dolphins - 89, to be exact, of the 793 that died on East Coast beaches. His 24-hour stranded mammal hot line (609-266-0538 or 609-348-5018)
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Robert Schoelkopf had a $500 June electric bill because of an air conditioner that ran full blast. But it was not Schoelkopf's comfort at stake. It was his house guests: three malnourished arctic seals recuperating at the Marine Mammal Stranding Center here. Schoelkopf, the center's co-director, released all three back into their natural habitat the first week of July, fatter and happier than ever. But if a dolphin needed a place to recover with such creature comforts, Schoelkopf would be out of luck.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
With today's official opening of its new Marine Mammals Pavilion, the National Aquarium here has something that it has lacked for the first decade of its existence - heroes. Up to now, the stars of this very popular attraction have been sharks. Within the intentionally dark and disorienting harbor-side building, visitors have taken a zigzag voyage to the bottom of the aquarium tank, passing many different kinds of fish, with the climax of the journey being a nose-to-nose encounter with some of the world's most efficiently designed carnivores.
LIVING
January 6, 1994 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A gale howled Monday night outside the two small, gray buildings of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center. Inside, director Bob Schoelkopf was on the phone with reporters and the public. It had been that way for several days, with some callers saying he had done too little to save four dolphins stranded in a central New Jersey river and some complaining he had done too much. Schoelkopf hung up the phone and looked at a bank of cameras in his office. A monitor showed a baby harp seal - recently washed up on Island Beach State Park with a broken jaw - resting in an adjacent building.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The governors of five Atlantic states yesterday announced formation of a bipartisan, joint effort to coordinate cleanup and long-range protection of the seashore. The initial members are New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Maine and Connecticut, according to an announcement at the 84th annual meeting of the National Governors Association by Govs. Florio of New Jersey, Castle of Delaware and William D. Schaefer of Maryland. New York and Massachusetts in the Northeast, as well as Florida, Virginia and the Carolinas in the South, were reviewing the agreement but had not decided whether to sign it. "Together we can get the most out of state and federal dollars . . . in protecting some of the greatest beaches in the world," said Schaefer, who has been designated the National Governors Association leader on ocean and Great Lakes protection issues.
NEWS
June 13, 1998 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One of two dolphins that washed up along the Jersey Shore on Thursday died of intestinal strangulation, an unusual condition, while the other dolphin's death is still being investigated, officials said. However, the deaths were not among a high number of marine mammal deaths this year attributed to commercial fishing operations, according to necropsies performed yesterday. A 400-pound pelagic bottlenose dolphin and a 400-pound Risso's dolphin were examined for causes of death at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine's New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa., after they were found on beaches in Lower Township and Longport.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
The fish don't look stressed. In fact, with the exception of the black eel who at present isn't getting along with his lobster neighbors (they keep walking on him with their pointy toes), the fish in the Thomas H. Kean New Jersey State Aquarium at Camden look like they're living a pretty good life. They eat better than a lot of people do. Everything they get is restaurant quality. They have nice digs. And they have hundreds of fishy friends to chum around with, including sharks, puffer fish and sea horses.
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