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Marine Mammals

FOOD
December 5, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
TUNA TSORIS Bet you thought you'd heard the last about dolphin-safe tuna. Wrong. In an angry parting of the ways, several environmental groups allege that the Thailand-based parent company of Bumble Bee Seafoods Inc. has not lived up to its promise to buy only tuna caught by such methods. Officials of Bumble Bee, H. J. Heinz's StarKist Seafood Co. and Van Kamp Seafood Co. Inc.'s Chicken of the Sea brand pledged in April not to buy tuna caught in ways that harm the marine mammals.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Kristin Huckshorn, Inquirer Washington Bureau Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A pornographic magazine featuring Siamese twins was left on a beach in Santa Cruz, Calif. Two funeral wreaths, a prosthetic foot and 2 1/4 pounds of marijuana were found in Florida. Tampon applicators were most abundant in Cape Cod. California accounted for the most underclothing. Overall, 10 kitchen sinks, 3,741 condoms, 34,139 fast-food containers and one life-size inflatable doll were dumped on the nation's beaches last year, according to a study of coastline cleanups released last week by the Center for Marine Conservation.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
Daily on CNN, high-ranking Defense Department spokesmen brag about America's military might. Yet today, on Capitol Hill, Congress is likely to hear testimony that woodpeckers and dolphins are impeding military readiness. What's up with that? A larger agenda is playing out in Washington, one that wouldn't necessarily protect soldiers but would surely endanger public health. Under the guise of preparation for war, the Pentagon is seeking broad exemptions from environmental laws that regulate air pollution, hazardous waste and toxic cleanup and that protect endangered species, migratory birds and marine mammals.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It could take 30 years for the dolphins that frolic along the Atlantic shore to bounce back from two disastrous summers, marine researchers say. With final results expected tomorrow from a study of hundreds of dolphin deaths in 1987, scientists say the mysterious plague has left a long-term legacy. "Our estimates are that it may take 30 years for them to recover to the point of being a thriving part of the ecosystem," Douglas Burn, a biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service in Miami, said recently.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Mary Pemberton, Associated Press
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Three killer whales have made an unprecedented trek into a freshwater river in southwest Alaska, a rare move for the saltwater mammals, federal officials said Thursday. Barbara Mahoney, a biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service in Anchorage, said it was the first time that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration had received a report of killer whales being in freshwater in the state. The whales, also known as orcas, swam about 30 miles up the Nushagak River to a spot just downriver from the village of Ekwok.
NEWS
April 15, 2005 | By Joel Bewley and Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The whale will have the run of the river, for now. Experts who evaluated the 12-foot beluga whale that made a 1,200-mile trip to the Delaware River said yesterday that the animal did not appear to be in any immediate danger and that it would be unsafe to try to capture him. "Even if we wanted to catch the animal, we couldn't do it," said Larry Dunn, a beluga specialist with Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut. "The animal is too strong. " One main threat to the whale now is humans - particularly boaters who might take to the river with good weather this weekend, Dunn and officials said.
NEWS
August 4, 2003 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Alaska is melting. Glaciers are receding. Permafrost is thawing. Roads are collapsing. Forests are dying. Villages are being forced to move, and animals are being forced to seek new habitats. What is happening in Alaska is a preview of what people farther south can expect, said Robert Corell, a former National Science Foundation scientist who heads research for the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment team. "If you want to see what will be happening in the rest of the world 25 years from now, just look at what's happening in the Arctic," Corell said.
NEWS
May 28, 2005 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Call it the flight of the Pennsylvanians to the Jersey Shore, the laughing gulls to the Atlantic, the red knots to the Delaware Bay, and the turtles to the salt marshes. As the Memorial Day weekend begins - they're all back. An estimated half-million people will travel to the Jersey Shore over the next three days. Tens of thousands of shore birds, marine mammals, and other species will also make their way to a spot that naturalists consider among the most ecologically diverse on the planet.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey sought an injunction Thursday to halt research off the coast that the state says "could adversely impact" marine life and the state's tourism and fishing industries. The complaint, filed in U.S. District Court in Trenton, seeks to prevent a National Science Foundation-owned research vessel from conducting studies that would involve aiming loud pulses of sound deep into the ocean floor. Special acoustic equipment would capture the reflected sound waves and convert them into images that would allow scientists to discern sea-level changes from as long ago as 50 million years.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scientists led by a Rutgers University geologist say the Jersey Shore is a world-class place to study sea level rise, and they plan to bombard a swath of the seabed off Long Beach Island with sound waves for a month this summer to unlock the secrets of what has happened in the past - and what could happen next. But environmentalists, who might normally support research related to climate change, are aghast at the prospect, saying it might harm whales and other marine mammals, as well as New Jersey's vibrant summer seafood and tourism economy.
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