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Marine Mammals

NEWS
January 31, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It could take 30 years for the dolphins that frolic along the Atlantic shore to bounce back from two disastrous summers, marine researchers say. With final results expected tomorrow from a study of hundreds of dolphin deaths in 1987, scientists say the mysterious plague has left a long-term legacy. "Our estimates are that it may take 30 years for them to recover to the point of being a thriving part of the ecosystem," Douglas Burn, a biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service in Miami, said recently.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Mary Pemberton, Associated Press
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Three killer whales have made an unprecedented trek into a freshwater river in southwest Alaska, a rare move for the saltwater mammals, federal officials said Thursday. Barbara Mahoney, a biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service in Anchorage, said it was the first time that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration had received a report of killer whales being in freshwater in the state. The whales, also known as orcas, swam about 30 miles up the Nushagak River to a spot just downriver from the village of Ekwok.
NEWS
April 15, 2005 | By Joel Bewley and Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The whale will have the run of the river, for now. Experts who evaluated the 12-foot beluga whale that made a 1,200-mile trip to the Delaware River said yesterday that the animal did not appear to be in any immediate danger and that it would be unsafe to try to capture him. "Even if we wanted to catch the animal, we couldn't do it," said Larry Dunn, a beluga specialist with Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut. "The animal is too strong. " One main threat to the whale now is humans - particularly boaters who might take to the river with good weather this weekend, Dunn and officials said.
NEWS
August 4, 2003 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Alaska is melting. Glaciers are receding. Permafrost is thawing. Roads are collapsing. Forests are dying. Villages are being forced to move, and animals are being forced to seek new habitats. What is happening in Alaska is a preview of what people farther south can expect, said Robert Corell, a former National Science Foundation scientist who heads research for the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment team. "If you want to see what will be happening in the rest of the world 25 years from now, just look at what's happening in the Arctic," Corell said.
NEWS
May 28, 2005 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Call it the flight of the Pennsylvanians to the Jersey Shore, the laughing gulls to the Atlantic, the red knots to the Delaware Bay, and the turtles to the salt marshes. As the Memorial Day weekend begins - they're all back. An estimated half-million people will travel to the Jersey Shore over the next three days. Tens of thousands of shore birds, marine mammals, and other species will also make their way to a spot that naturalists consider among the most ecologically diverse on the planet.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
D. James Baker, the retiring administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has been named the new president of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Baker will take office May 20 and will be charged with raising the national and international profile of the venerable Philadelphia institution. Baker, 65, will replace Seymour S. Preston 3d, who has been serving as interim president since the departure of president Paul Hanle in April 2000. Baker, an oceanographer who has sailed the world's seas, invented a method of measuring ocean currents, and overseen the launching of four ocean-observing satellites, said he was attracted to the academy because of its impressive 190-year history and its mission to bring natural history and environmental issues to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Environmental concerns, voiced by theater companies from Australia and Africa, will be the subject of several productions at the Philadelphia International Theatre Festival for Children at the Annenberg Center May 24-28. The festival, which is in its 11th season, annually draws about 30,000 children and adults to West Philadelphia. It will present the work of 10 companies from six countries at five theaters in and around the Annenberg Center on the University of Pennsylvania campus.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | by Rob Laymon, For the Daily News
Not long ago, Linda Kelly of Absecon noticed something strange about the ocean near Atlantic City: You could see through it. "It was beautiful, a Caribbean blue-green," Kelly said. "And this in a place where you'd sometimes find debris floating. " Environmental officials have called this the best year for water quality in memory. Bacteria counts are at an all-time low, street runoff is under control and the temperatures have kept the red and brown tides away for the most part.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | By Tina Kelley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sign on the above-ground pool read "Quiet Please. " Children were asked not to sit on the railing next to the pool, or step past an area marked off by chairs. "It's like a hospital he's in right now, and we like to keep it as quiet as possible," said Mark Harris, 29, of Williamstown, a volunteer at the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine. He kept twice-weekly vigils over this hospital's sole patient, a 5-foot, 4-inch striped dolphin. This patient got a lot of visitors, people who stopped by to see his progress and comment on how much better he looked last week than the week before.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
While public school students throughout the state are enjoying time off from school tomorrow and Friday, 35,000 of their teachers, school secretaries and in some cases even custodians will be in Atlantic City for the 132d annual convention of the New Jersey Education Association, the union that represents the majority of the state's teachers. With the theme "NJEA Creating Tomorrow Today," the association has put together a list of workshops and seminars that fills 70 pages.
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