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Marine Pilot

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NEWS
October 6, 1987 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
When the U.S. Marine Corps came looking for a few good men in 1975, they found one in Daniel S. Haworth, a "regular kid" from New Castle County who became a star swimmer at the University of Delaware and later found a love of flying in the cockpit of a helicopter. "We were all surprised when he said he wanted to be a pilot," his father, Burton Haworth, said yesterday. "He never even mentioned it as a kid, and then all of the sudden he comes home from boot camp and tells us he's going to flight school to be a helicopter pilot.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calling American military pilots "Rambos," some members of Italy's media and government yesterday demanded criminal prosecution of a Marine whose surveillance jet sliced a cable car wire Tuesday, sending 20 people plunging to their deaths at a ski resort. Outrage over the accident erupted throughout the Italian government, especially from the Refounded Communist Party, which has been seeking to close American military bases in Italy since the 1950s. Italian politicians yesterday visited the Alpe Cermis ski resort, where the snow was still streaked with the blood of skiers and a cable operator who fell nearly 300 feet.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
GENEVIEVE Patricia Holmes endured some of the worst tragedies of recent American history that invaded her own life. Raised during World War I and the Depression, her husband, a Marine pilot, was killed at Iwo Jima in World War II, and her only child, who survived combat in Vietnam, died of cancer at age 41. "All that would be enough to ingrain a person with a perpetually sour approach to life," her nephew William Begley said in a eulogy at...
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph S. Wohl was a dentist whose best advertisement was his own flawless, boyish grin. "He could have done the Pepsodent ads," said Dr. Ralph Jessar, a lifelong friend. "He never lost his boyhood charm or his looks. " When he died Wednesday of cancer at age 70, friends marveled about how Dr. Wohl had kept all of his blond hair until the end, and how none of it had ever turned gray. "Nobody could believe he was 70," said Nona Abrams, another longtime friend. "He never lost a follicle, even through the worst chemotherapy.
NEWS
May 15, 2010 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dream home of the dreamt-up Marine was sold Friday at a Bucks County sheriff's sale. The unfinished McMansion of Andrew A. Diabo - having sat abandoned and decaying for a decade while debts of $530,942 piled up - was claimed by his lender, GMAC Mortgage, for $892 in costs. For years, Diabo, 38, had held unhappy neighbors, creditors, and township officials at bay by portraying himself as a decorated, wounded Marine pilot on constant deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. But as The Inquirer reported last month, it was a ruse he had parlayed into sympathetic stories in the local media, free legal help, and kid-gloves treatment by Tinicum Township regulators.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | By Peter Nicholas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congressional supporters of the military's troubled V-22 Osprey staged an event at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard yesterday that was part hearing and part pep rally aimed at boosting confidence in an aircraft that endured two fatal crashes last year. In the backyard of the Delaware County Boeing plant that builds a portion of the Osprey, Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.) led an Armed Services subcommittee hearing in which Marine Corps officers portrayed the aircraft as a technological marvel far outclassing the Vietnam-era helicopters it is to replace.
SPORTS
November 10, 2006 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The shape of the future would have surprised them all as, inside the East Mount Airy house that served as Owl Stadium's home locker room, Temple's football team changed out of its wet and muddy football uniforms that long-ago Saturday. It was Oct. 18, 1941, and the Owls had just beaten Penn State, 14-0. Jim Woodside, Frank Moister, Ed Stec and their teammates couldn't have known - and wouldn't have believed anyway - that 65 years later, as the same two schools prepare to meet tomorrow in State College, Temple would still be looking for its next win over Penn State.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Gwen Florio, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an age where 9-year-old boys' heroes run to reptilian cartoon characters, Michael Biello idolizes a flesh-and-blood warrior: "Stormin' Norman" of Operation Desert Storm. The other Stormin' Norman, that is - Capt. Matthew B. Norman, who got the nickname from his fellow Marines five years ago. When he got to Philadelphia yesterday, Norman didn't care when or why that other guy came to share the monicker. All he cared about was meeting Michael and the other children who sent the "Any Serviceman" care package that provided his Christmas Day feast of cheese crackers in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
May 15, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dream home of the dreamt-up Marine was sold Friday at a Bucks County sheriff's sale. The unfinished McMansion of Andrew A. Diabo - having sat abandoned and decaying for a decade while debts of $530,942 piled up - was claimed by his lender, GMAC Mortgage, for $892 in costs. For years, Diabo, 38, had held unhappy neighbors, creditors, and township officials at bay by portraying himself as a decorated, wounded Marine pilot on constant deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. But as The Inquirer reported last month, it was a ruse he had parlayed into sympathetic stories in the local media, free legal help, and kid-gloves treatment by Tinicum Township regulators.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William S. Shannon Jr., 66, a Marine sergeant major who survived two battle injuries and three wars, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in the Northeast. Sgt. Maj. Shannon was Marine to the core. He first joined when he was 15 and saw action in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Twice he was wounded, and once his wife was notified that he was dead, but he lived to pin on a Purple Heart and a chest full of ribbons. In all, he spent 31 years in the service, performed just about every duty the Marines had to offer, and hopscotched the world from one base to another.
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NEWS
January 27, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
GENEVIEVE Patricia Holmes endured some of the worst tragedies of recent American history that invaded her own life. Raised during World War I and the Depression, her husband, a Marine pilot, was killed at Iwo Jima in World War II, and her only child, who survived combat in Vietnam, died of cancer at age 41. "All that would be enough to ingrain a person with a perpetually sour approach to life," her nephew William Begley said in a eulogy at...
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN OLIVER NORTH needed funds ostensibly for a Nicaraguan church during the infamous Iran-Contra scandal of the mid-'80s, he enlisted the help of a Philadelphia stockbroker. The stockbroker, Jonathan J. Hirtle, contacted two Philadelphia-area business executives, Donald E. Meads, former chairman of CertainTeed Corp., and James Macaleer, CEO of Shared Medical Systems of Malvern, to meet with North. As a result of that meeting in Washington, D.C., in August 1985, one of the executives donated $60,000 for North's activities.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For three hours Tuesday, the tears flowed as Matthew Devlin and his wife, Corinne, described their remorse and misery since he piloted a 250-foot barge over a duck boat stalled in the Delaware off Penn's Landing and killed two Hungarian students. U.S. District Judge Legrome D. Davis sympathized, calling the couple "good people" and good parents, and adding that "this case is sadness, permanent human sadness on both sides of the ocean. " Then Davis sentenced Devlin, 35, to a year and a day in prison, saying that as a marine pilot Devlin was a trained professional whom the public depended on to set aside personal problems and do his job. Devlin will surrender Jan. 5 at a federal prison.
NEWS
May 15, 2010 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dream home of the dreamt-up Marine was sold Friday at a Bucks County sheriff's sale. The unfinished McMansion of Andrew A. Diabo - having sat abandoned and decaying for a decade while debts of $530,942 piled up - was claimed by his lender, GMAC Mortgage, for $892 in costs. For years, Diabo, 38, had held unhappy neighbors, creditors, and township officials at bay by portraying himself as a decorated, wounded Marine pilot on constant deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. But as The Inquirer reported last month, it was a ruse he had parlayed into sympathetic stories in the local media, free legal help, and kid-gloves treatment by Tinicum Township regulators.
NEWS
May 15, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dream home of the dreamt-up Marine was sold Friday at a Bucks County sheriff's sale. The unfinished McMansion of Andrew A. Diabo - having sat abandoned and decaying for a decade while debts of $530,942 piled up - was claimed by his lender, GMAC Mortgage, for $892 in costs. For years, Diabo, 38, had held unhappy neighbors, creditors, and township officials at bay by portraying himself as a decorated, wounded Marine pilot on constant deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. But as The Inquirer reported last month, it was a ruse he had parlayed into sympathetic stories in the local media, free legal help, and kid-gloves treatment by Tinicum Township regulators.
NEWS
April 25, 2010 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The local war hero has vanished, having slipped out of Bucks County as quietly as the Delaware flows past his riverfront loft in Upper Black Eddy. Behind him lie debts exceeding a half-million dollars, an unfinished McMansion on three acres, and a criminal inquiry into the deceit of Andrew Alexander Diabo. In news stories, private conversations, and public documents, Diabo cast himself as a wounded Marine helicopter pilot who deployed repeatedly to Afghanistan and Iraq. Visitors tell of having seen Marine dress blues and West Point cadet grays hanging in his apartment closet and, on a wall, framed Purple Heart and Silver Star certificates.
SPORTS
November 10, 2006 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The shape of the future would have surprised them all as, inside the East Mount Airy house that served as Owl Stadium's home locker room, Temple's football team changed out of its wet and muddy football uniforms that long-ago Saturday. It was Oct. 18, 1941, and the Owls had just beaten Penn State, 14-0. Jim Woodside, Frank Moister, Ed Stec and their teammates couldn't have known - and wouldn't have believed anyway - that 65 years later, as the same two schools prepare to meet tomorrow in State College, Temple would still be looking for its next win over Penn State.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former Phillies pitcher Cory Lidle was as unflappable a pilot as he was facing major-league batters, his associates say. His flight instructor, Tyler Stanger, recently told an interviewer that many people fail to take command in an emergency. But not Lidle. It may be months before the National Transportation Safety Board determines what caused Lidle's Cirrus SR20 airplane to crash into a high-rise condominium building on Manhattan's Upper East Side, killing the pitcher and one other person.
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Charles Spahr worked with handicapped children after college - he loved his job as a gym teacher, using his strong body and caring spirit to help the young people who needed him most. But he had always dreamed of being a pilot, and began thinking of another kind of service, his family said. After a few years, Spahr, a Cherry Hill native and graduate of St. Joseph's Preparatory School and the University of Delaware, entered the Marines. Yesterday, the military confirmed that Spahr, 42, whose plane was reported missing earlier this week, died 15 miles from Karbala, in south central Iraq.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | By Peter Nicholas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congressional supporters of the military's troubled V-22 Osprey staged an event at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard yesterday that was part hearing and part pep rally aimed at boosting confidence in an aircraft that endured two fatal crashes last year. In the backyard of the Delaware County Boeing plant that builds a portion of the Osprey, Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.) led an Armed Services subcommittee hearing in which Marine Corps officers portrayed the aircraft as a technological marvel far outclassing the Vietnam-era helicopters it is to replace.
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