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Maritime Industry

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NEWS
November 5, 1986 | By Clifford M. Sayre
There is trouble on our nation's waterfronts and it comes at the worst possible time for American businesses and consumers, even those located far from any shoreline. At many of our nation's most important port cities, longshoremen and shipping companies are in the midst of a nasty and chaotic labor dispute. In recent weeks, there have been strikes at several ports, including New York, New Orleans and Philadelphia. Union locals and shipping companies have come to terms in some cities, but the International Longshoremen's Association is threatening a shutdown along much of the East and Gulf Coasts if an agreement is not signed by Nov. 17. There is a lot more at stake in these negotiations than meets the eye. All of us in the United States depend on the maritime industry to bring us products from abroad.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2008 | By Henry J. Holcomb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The maritime industry on the Delaware River is in a stormy mood. A developer, Charles Gallub, who now uses dredged materials from the Port of New York and New Jersey to reclaim a brownfields site in Camden County, is also buying the only site on the Delaware that accepts silt from maintenance dredging of the river. Maritime executives and port officials are afraid that site, adjacent to the Commodore Barry Bridge in Logan Township, Gloucester County, will be filled with dredged materials from the New York port to hasten the day when Gallub can build on it. Gallub already has plans for a substantial commercial development on the Camden County property, in Bellmawr.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1988 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Although they don't know where political currents could take them, members of the Delaware River maritime industry had their hopes raised yesterday, following a shipboard meeting of the region's three governors. After a 90-minute afternoon cruise of the Delaware, Pennsylvania's Gov. Casey, New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean, and Delaware Gov. Michael N. Castle promised they would cooperate to bring more commerce to the floundering port. The only specific commitment came from Casey, who said he supports a proposal to provide $34 million in state grants to renovate and expand piers and warehouses managed by the Philadelphia Port Corp.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1997 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
At least five new businesses are coming to the old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, now called the Philadelphia Naval Business Center in South Philadelphia. They represent 108 new jobs for the center and include: Canadian & Pacific Railroad, Delaware and Hudson division, which will lease five acres and 4,000 feet of rail line for cargo distribution and employ eight to 10. The International Institute of Forensic Sciences, a nonprofit organization that determines the cause and manner of death and injury; employing five.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1987 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
City officials said yesterday they will use $50,000 in state funds to figure out what types of development could enhance decaying portions of the riverfront. The funding is part of a plan to create a 14-mile-long "enterprise zone" along the Delaware River. At a press conference yesterday on a pier at Snyder Avenue, Gov. Thornburgh announced state approval for the enterprise zone planning district, which gives the city one year to submit plans for how it wants to see the riverfront area develop.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Yinka Ibukun, Associated Press
ABOARD THE HSV 2 SWIFT - Pirate attacks off West Africa's coast have increased to levels that rival those in Somalia, insurers say, prompting maritime agencies to try to set aside their conflicts and cooperate to fight the threat. The International Maritime Bureau says Nigeria and Benin reported 18 pirate attacks in the first half of 2011. Though that is fewer than figures attributed to Somali pirates, analysts say the number of attacks off Nigerian waters is underreported because some ships carry illegal oil cargo and others fear their insurance rates will rise.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1988 | By Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Officials from Pennsylvania and New Jersey have drafted a plan that would allow the Delaware River Port Authority to finance maritime construction projects for the first time in its 37-year history. Representatives of Pennsylvania Gov. Casey and New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean are putting the finishing touches on the tentative agreement, which the governors want to announce Tuesday at a summit meeting to discuss the port. Allowing the DRPA to finance projects would establish the bistate agency as a new power in the fractured local maritime industry, which has a patchwork arrangement of three public agencies and four privately owned terminals.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis H. "Pex" Muldoon, 67, the ruddy, robust shipping executive who served on the board of the Philadelphia Port Corp. for 20 years and was a longtime maritime industry leader, died of cancer Thursday in Key West, Fla. He lived in Lafayette Hill. Mr. Muldoon was chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Lavino Shipping Co., which operates international cargo terminals including the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in Philadelphia. Mr. Muldoon had become president of the company and its subsidiaries in 1974 and rose to the chairmanship in 1981.
NEWS
August 12, 1988
Would you build a house in a place where the government had the legal right to knock it down on a whim? More to the point, would your banker give you the time of day - let alone the money to build it? That, in a nutshell, is the quandary facing developers who have plans to build five major projects along Philadelphia's waterfront to the north and south of Penn's Landing. These projects will go a long way toward creating what city officials envision as a new residential and commercial community rising among the city's long-defunct docks.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1987 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Those involved in shipping along the city's waterfront know the port is in trouble, losing lucrative and job-generating cargo to other Atlantic seaports, says the new chairman of the Delaware River Port Authority. But Francis A. Scanlan, a Philadelphia maritime lawyer installed yesterday as the port authority chief, says the more vexing problem is that most other people don't even realize there's a maritime industry here. "There are many people who don't know where the port is, and I think that's a big tragedy," Scanlan said after the authority's 15-member board unanimously elected him to a two-year term as chairman.
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NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Yinka Ibukun, Associated Press
ABOARD THE HSV 2 SWIFT - Pirate attacks off West Africa's coast have increased to levels that rival those in Somalia, insurers say, prompting maritime agencies to try to set aside their conflicts and cooperate to fight the threat. The International Maritime Bureau says Nigeria and Benin reported 18 pirate attacks in the first half of 2011. Though that is fewer than figures attributed to Somali pirates, analysts say the number of attacks off Nigerian waters is underreported because some ships carry illegal oil cargo and others fear their insurance rates will rise.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2008 | By Henry J. Holcomb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The maritime industry on the Delaware River is in a stormy mood. A developer, Charles Gallub, who now uses dredged materials from the Port of New York and New Jersey to reclaim a brownfields site in Camden County, is also buying the only site on the Delaware that accepts silt from maintenance dredging of the river. Maritime executives and port officials are afraid that site, adjacent to the Commodore Barry Bridge in Logan Township, Gloucester County, will be filled with dredged materials from the New York port to hasten the day when Gallub can build on it. Gallub already has plans for a substantial commercial development on the Camden County property, in Bellmawr.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2008 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's maritime industry - business executives, labor leaders, and longshoremen waving thank-you signs - cheered yesterday as Army and Pennsylvania officials signed a formal agreement to deepen the Delaware River. Gov. Rendell, calling it "the most important project in the history of the port," said dredging could begin in 10 months. He said the $379 million project would protect existing jobs and create tens of thousands more. Not so fast, said a spokeswoman for New Jersey Gov. Corzine.
NEWS
June 23, 2008 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's maritime industry - business executives, labor leaders, and longshoremen waving thank-you signs - cheered today as Army and Pennsylvania officials signed a formal agreement to deepen the Delaware River. Gov. Rendell, calling it "the most important project in the history of the port," said dredging could begin in 10 months. He said the $379 million project would protect existing jobs and create tens of thousands more. Not so fast, said a spokeswoman for New Jersey Gov. Corzine.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2008 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Penn Terminals Inc., a busy seaport in Delaware County, is being acquired by a deep-pockets global investment fund that plans to invest in its long-range growth. Macquarie Infrastructure Partners and Penn Terminals officials said yesterday that a sales agreement had been signed, but they would not disclose the financial terms. Macquarie is a $4 billion fund based in New York, with investors mostly from the United States and Canada. It is managed by the Macquarie Group Ltd., of Sydney, Australia.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Rendell yesterday assigned his former chief of staff John H. Estey to pilot a massive expansion in the city's seaport. And he gave Estey the clout to do it, naming him the unpaid chairman of the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority, the state agency that is the landlord of state-owned docks and is responsible for promoting the maritime industry. Estey was Rendell's chief of staff during his first term as governor and as his deputy chief of staff when he was mayor of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1997 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
At least five new businesses are coming to the old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, now called the Philadelphia Naval Business Center in South Philadelphia. They represent 108 new jobs for the center and include: Canadian & Pacific Railroad, Delaware and Hudson division, which will lease five acres and 4,000 feet of rail line for cargo distribution and employ eight to 10. The International Institute of Forensic Sciences, a nonprofit organization that determines the cause and manner of death and injury; employing five.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis H. "Pex" Muldoon, 67, the ruddy, robust shipping executive who served on the board of the Philadelphia Port Corp. for 20 years and was a longtime maritime industry leader, died of cancer Thursday in Key West, Fla. He lived in Lafayette Hill. Mr. Muldoon was chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Lavino Shipping Co., which operates international cargo terminals including the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in Philadelphia. Mr. Muldoon had become president of the company and its subsidiaries in 1974 and rose to the chairmanship in 1981.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1988 | By Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Officials from Pennsylvania and New Jersey have drafted a plan that would allow the Delaware River Port Authority to finance maritime construction projects for the first time in its 37-year history. Representatives of Pennsylvania Gov. Casey and New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean are putting the finishing touches on the tentative agreement, which the governors want to announce Tuesday at a summit meeting to discuss the port. Allowing the DRPA to finance projects would establish the bistate agency as a new power in the fractured local maritime industry, which has a patchwork arrangement of three public agencies and four privately owned terminals.
NEWS
August 12, 1988
Would you build a house in a place where the government had the legal right to knock it down on a whim? More to the point, would your banker give you the time of day - let alone the money to build it? That, in a nutshell, is the quandary facing developers who have plans to build five major projects along Philadelphia's waterfront to the north and south of Penn's Landing. These projects will go a long way toward creating what city officials envision as a new residential and commercial community rising among the city's long-defunct docks.
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