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Mark Antony

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NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The Shakespeare project at the Public Theater picks up steam with a dynamic Julius Caesar that opened on Tuesday. In staging Shakespeare's drama of the most famous political assassination in history, producer Joseph Papp has cast Martin Sheen and Edward Herrmann as assassins and Al Pacino as the avenger, Mark Antony. The celebrity casting is Papp's way to get a larger public acquainted with Shakespeare, whose 36 plays he plans to stage over the next several years. The policy works better with Caesar than it did in the first offering of the series, the Brazilian A Midsummer Night's Dream, in which F. Murray Abraham was miscast as Bottom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Is there a more terrifying line than Mark Antony's in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar : "Cry, 'Havoc!' And let slip the dogs of war"? This powerful play is about self-deluded warrior-politicians; it is filled with conspiracy, ambition, corruption, betrayal, and tyranny. And if the leaders are vicious, the public, easily manipulated, is worse. The Lantern Theatre production, under the direction of Charles McMahon, is both intriguing and frustrating. Julius Caesar is a play for all times, as Shakespeare's plays always turn out to be, whether the setting is ancient Rome or the forest of Arden.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Julius Caesar is a play that begins slowly, builds to a climax, then drops precipitously into an obligatory conclusion that doesn't seem to interest even the playwright, much less the audience. The strengths and weaknesses of the Villanova University Summer Theater production exaggerate these rhythms of Shakespeare's play. Director James J. Christy's highly visual and active staging combine with a strong Mark Antony to make the middle of the play, from just before the murder of Caesar through Antony's speech to the Roman populace, fine, exhilarating theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2010 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
The two red granite statues, each more than 16 feet tall, entered the Franklin Institute one recent morning through soaring glass loading doors on the second floor. The great figure of a king went first, resting in a crate atop a metal pallet lifted by a crane. Soon he would stand beside an Egyptian queen, also from Cleopatra's Ptolemaic era - two monumental artifacts of her mysterious world. A rigging crew and several Egyptians - present whenever their country's antiquities are in transit - worked quietly, pulling the statues inside, unpacking them, standing them upright.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When the assassins arrive at the meeting where they will murder Julius Caesar, a metal detector screens them before they are allowed to enter the room. Since they have stashed their knives in a briefcase under a table in advance, the security check is no obstacle. This time-spanning touch in Daniel Sullivan?s clamorous, pleasingly multiracial, modern-dress staging of Julius Caesar proves to be one of its few subtle and pointed moments. It?s an image that argues the timeless and ever relevant qualities of Shakespeare?s consideration of the uses and abuses of power and idealism.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a trident in one hand and a net in the other, Gianluca Zanna, who goes by the name of Spartacus and looks as if he just hopped off a Harley, glittered in black leather and silver studs as he winked at a few blond tourists and spoke of a gladiator's joy. Sure there were the financial squabbles with his partner, the breast-plated, perpetually sweating Mark Antony. Sure he jangled when he walked and his sandals gave him blisters. And, yes, British tourists were often chintzy with tips.
NEWS
July 21, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
What concerned me most about Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's Antony and Cleopatra wasn't how director Patrick Mulcahy was going to rassle with the zillion or so scene changes required, or how he would subdue Shakespeare's wildly complicated script. No, the most pressing question I had was: How would Greg Wood - who earlier this season iced down the action as a bloodlessly satanic Mr. Lockhart in Arden Theatre's production of The Seafarer - pull off the passion-fueled, impulse-driven, panting lion in winter Mark Antony?
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Sam and Charlie Whitehead, who have grown up rich in Westchester County, might not know how lucky they were. Then again, they might. They've been lucky not because of the money the family has, but because of their mother. She is not only a crack housekeeper but she also reads bedtime stories uncommonly well and writes poetry that any kid can enjoy. Every now and then, she bursts into song and does not worry about whether she's as good at that as, say, Barbra Streisand and Beverly Sills are. Sam and Charlie's mother calls herself a Westchester matron.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By MADOREE PIPKINS, pipkinm@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
The name Cleopatra conjures an image of beauty and mystery. Modern movies and artists portray the Queen of the Nile as powerful and glamorous, but there is much more to her story. After Egypt fell to Roman forces, Cleopatra famously took her own life after her lover Mark Antony killed himself. The Romans then tried to wipe her legacy from the pages of history. To this day, her body and burial crypt, as well as much of the evidence of her reign, have been lost to the sands and waters of Egypt.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Would you buy Julius Caesar - the Julius Caesar - as a contemporary politician in Latin America, North Africa or Lebanon? Actually, my first impression at the start of last night's opening of the Shakespeare tragedy "Julius Caesar" at the Zellerbach was that we had landed once more in Cuba, the contemporizing locale of The Acting Company's "Much Ado About Nothing" earlier this season, what with the guerrilla-style uniforms and the likeness of Dr....
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NEWS
April 15, 2015
I AM DEAD. I am in my casket, I am in a dress shirt, tie and sports coat. This is my funeral. People are saying nice things about me. At least I think so. I can't hear. Showering accolades on the departed is mandatory, right? No lie detectors allowed. Remember Mark Antony spilling about Caesar? (Not implying I am Caesar, but I do carry a toga well.) What a shame the deceased can't hear this - the impact he had on lives, the good works she inspired, the causes fought, the memories created.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Is there a more terrifying line than Mark Antony's in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar : "Cry, 'Havoc!' And let slip the dogs of war"? This powerful play is about self-deluded warrior-politicians; it is filled with conspiracy, ambition, corruption, betrayal, and tyranny. And if the leaders are vicious, the public, easily manipulated, is worse. The Lantern Theatre production, under the direction of Charles McMahon, is both intriguing and frustrating. Julius Caesar is a play for all times, as Shakespeare's plays always turn out to be, whether the setting is ancient Rome or the forest of Arden.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why were we utterly unprepared for the Sept. 11 attacks? How come political pundits didn't foresee the fall of the Berlin Wall and the dismantling of the Soviet Union? How could our economic brain trust, with all their Nobel Prizes, not anticipate the 2008 economic meltdown? We didn't see any of it coming, says Nassim Nicholas Taleb, because we couldn't. History, Taleb argues in his new book, Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder (Random House, $30), is shot through with random, unforeseeable events.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By MADOREE PIPKINS, pipkinm@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
The name Cleopatra conjures an image of beauty and mystery. Modern movies and artists portray the Queen of the Nile as powerful and glamorous, but there is much more to her story. After Egypt fell to Roman forces, Cleopatra famously took her own life after her lover Mark Antony killed himself. The Romans then tried to wipe her legacy from the pages of history. To this day, her body and burial crypt, as well as much of the evidence of her reign, have been lost to the sands and waters of Egypt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2010 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
The two red granite statues, each more than 16 feet tall, entered the Franklin Institute one recent morning through soaring glass loading doors on the second floor. The great figure of a king went first, resting in a crate atop a metal pallet lifted by a crane. Soon he would stand beside an Egyptian queen, also from Cleopatra's Ptolemaic era - two monumental artifacts of her mysterious world. A rigging crew and several Egyptians - present whenever their country's antiquities are in transit - worked quietly, pulling the statues inside, unpacking them, standing them upright.
NEWS
July 21, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
What concerned me most about Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's Antony and Cleopatra wasn't how director Patrick Mulcahy was going to rassle with the zillion or so scene changes required, or how he would subdue Shakespeare's wildly complicated script. No, the most pressing question I had was: How would Greg Wood - who earlier this season iced down the action as a bloodlessly satanic Mr. Lockhart in Arden Theatre's production of The Seafarer - pull off the passion-fueled, impulse-driven, panting lion in winter Mark Antony?
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When the assassins arrive at the meeting where they will murder Julius Caesar, a metal detector screens them before they are allowed to enter the room. Since they have stashed their knives in a briefcase under a table in advance, the security check is no obstacle. This time-spanning touch in Daniel Sullivan?s clamorous, pleasingly multiracial, modern-dress staging of Julius Caesar proves to be one of its few subtle and pointed moments. It?s an image that argues the timeless and ever relevant qualities of Shakespeare?s consideration of the uses and abuses of power and idealism.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a trident in one hand and a net in the other, Gianluca Zanna, who goes by the name of Spartacus and looks as if he just hopped off a Harley, glittered in black leather and silver studs as he winked at a few blond tourists and spoke of a gladiator's joy. Sure there were the financial squabbles with his partner, the breast-plated, perpetually sweating Mark Antony. Sure he jangled when he walked and his sandals gave him blisters. And, yes, British tourists were often chintzy with tips.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The Shakespeare project at the Public Theater picks up steam with a dynamic Julius Caesar that opened on Tuesday. In staging Shakespeare's drama of the most famous political assassination in history, producer Joseph Papp has cast Martin Sheen and Edward Herrmann as assassins and Al Pacino as the avenger, Mark Antony. The celebrity casting is Papp's way to get a larger public acquainted with Shakespeare, whose 36 plays he plans to stage over the next several years. The policy works better with Caesar than it did in the first offering of the series, the Brazilian A Midsummer Night's Dream, in which F. Murray Abraham was miscast as Bottom.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Would you buy Julius Caesar - the Julius Caesar - as a contemporary politician in Latin America, North Africa or Lebanon? Actually, my first impression at the start of last night's opening of the Shakespeare tragedy "Julius Caesar" at the Zellerbach was that we had landed once more in Cuba, the contemporizing locale of The Acting Company's "Much Ado About Nothing" earlier this season, what with the guerrilla-style uniforms and the likeness of Dr....
1 | 2 | Next »
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