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Mark Twain

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1986 | By HILARY TAKIFF, Daily News Kid Reviewer (age 7 3/4) As told to JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Adventures of Mark Twain. " A fantasy film in Claymation. Directed and photographed by Will Vinton from a screenplay by Susan Shadburne. Edited by Kelly Baker, Michael Gall and Vinton. Music by Billy Scream. Featuring the voice of James Whitmore. Running time: 90 minutes. Rated G. A Clubhouse/ Atlantic release. In area theaters. 'The Adventures of Mark Twain" is a Claymation movie. That means that the people and the scenery and the objects are made out of clay and they move.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Though "Mark Twain Revealed," the incumbent tenant of the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 3 stage, is a one-man show, it is not - thank goodness - one of those interminable productions in which the actor dresses up like a literary or historical character or some benighted public figure laid low by booze or mental illness and does a number on same. The actor here proffered is basically a storyteller in street clothes who rears back and lets fly with choice selections from the writings of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, or Mark Twain, as the title specifies.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Italians are superstitious. Portuguese are lazy. Turks are dishonest. And the French? They're fat, and filthy besides. Welcome to the world of Mark Twain, who died 100 years ago this week. We know Twain best from his novels about life in America, especially The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In his time, however, he was more famous for documenting his adventures, overseas. He made his name as a travel writer, not as a novelist. Twain's jabs at Italians and other groups come from his first travel book, Innocents Abroad (1869)
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Mark Greenbaum
The House's passage last week of the Mark Twain Commemorative Coin Act might have provoked scathing mockery from Twain himself that we can only imagine. Beyond his likely bemusement at the tribute, Twain probably would have scorned its enactment by a Congress so broken by partisanship as to be unable to address more serious matters. Twain — who once suggested that coins should read "Within certain judicious limitations, we trust in God" — would have been tickled to see his face engraved on currency.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irving Scheindlin, 83, of Lower Merion, a former pharmacist and a columnist whose musings in his apartment newsletter won him the nickname of "the Mark Twain of Green Hill," died Monday at the Haverford Nursing Home. A 1929 graduate of Temple School of Pharmacy, Mr. Scheindlin was a pharmacist for nearly 40 years. From 1952 until he retired in 1968, he was the owner of the Paoli Center Pharmacy. "He was very literary, he read constantly," said his wife, the former Betty Bernstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mark Twain's new comedy opens on Broadway tomorrow night. That sounds ridiculous - the master of American humor has been dead for 97 years. But it's true. A Stanford University professor named Shelley Fisher Fishkin found Is He Dead?, Twain's never-staged melodramatic farce, in a file of the writer's material at the Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley five years ago. Twain wrote the play in 1898, and it went nowhere - until it opened in previews Nov. 8 at New York's 104-year-old Lyceum Theatre on 45th Street, a showplace Twain himself had attended when it had been operating only five years, according to a note in the show's Playbill.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
The reports of Mark Twain's literary demise are greatly exaggerated. From time to time, people say the old riverboat pilot, journalist, lecturer and storyteller is out of fashion. Thirty years ago, for example, Charles Neider wrote in a collection of the most famous stories of America's beloved humorist that while Mark Twain was undoubtedly a "national monument," his "fashion has dimmed in the last 40 years. " "He is seen to belong to another era," Neider declared, "the era of chromos and linsey-woolsey, of an extraordinary optimism, of a degree of national self-criticism rarely now enjoyed.
NEWS
November 21, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Peggy Neylan gasped, unused to such sights at punch-and-cookies Home and School Association meetings. "You've risen from the dead," she said to the man in the snazzy white suit who had just ambled into the Indian Mills Memorial School library. "You look well. " The man - the evening's featured speaker - was, he insisted, Mark Twain. Samuel Clemens. Call him whichever you like. Pressed, he admitted his alter ego: Haddonfield businessman Rick Bonnette. Bonnette was at the Burlington County school to give the 15 or so parents gathered for their monthly meeting advice about saving for college.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | By Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It started as a line drawn in the sand. On one side stood the parents of a group of African American students upset by the portrayal of blacks and the use of racial epithets in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. They wanted the novel banned from their children's classrooms. On the other were school officials who refused, arguing that the book is a classic that deserves a spot on the district's reading list. But rather than take their battle into a courtroom, the two groups got together and worked out a solution that will soon serve as a model to help teachers throughout the nation navigate Mark Twain's controversial 1884 novel.
LIVING
August 25, 1999 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Before Siskel & Ebert, the Emperor Nero wielded major power with his stubby digit. If you were an entertainer in Nero's day, thumbs up meant something even more important than strong box office. Peter Ustinov, no stranger to boffo b.o., with more than 80 features, played Nero in Quo Vadis nearly 50 years ago. Tonight on PBS, he plays himself, traveling On the Trail of Mark Twain, following a journey around the world that Twain made 102 years ago. Seeking to establish rapport with a Hawaiian named Clarence, Ustinov tries to jog the man's memory.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 26, 2015
ISSUE | 'HUCK FINN' Classes on racism I was surprised that Friends' Central School removed The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from its 11th grade American literature course (" 'Huckleberry Finn' still a school target," Dec. 11). The Cherry Hill School District confronted the same issues as Friends' Central but reached a different resolution. The district continued to use the book as great literature, but it also developed a curriculum to address racism in America as part of the study of the novel.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
ISSUE | 'HUCKLEBERRY FINN' Removing book won't end racism Students at Friends' Central School are uncomfortable with the N-word in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - a novel that Ernest Hemingway regarded as the fountainhead of American literature (" 'Huckleberry Finn' still a school target," Friday). It also discomforts me. I am also discomforted when Stanley in A Streetcar Named Desire abuses his wife and rapes her sister. And when Willy Loman commits suicide in Death of a Salesman . The Color Purple is troubling.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Hearing the words of Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and Ulysses S. Grant come to life is a privilege and a pleasure. The same goes for interviewing the actors who portray these three American icons onstage. "I hope we do more than entertain people," says longtime Twain actor Rick Bonnette. He's the author of two literate, witty, and affecting plays in which he will appear, separately, with Leon Morgan as Douglass and Richard Gross as Grant. "When you pick three towering figures to write about," Bonnette says, "you've got an opportunity to say something.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
In Act II Playhouse's Mark Twain Unplugged , Tom Teti, as Twain, remarks, "The works of fine literature are like wine; mine are like water. But everybody drinks water. " Much beloved, oft-quoted, occasionally banned, with a history as colorful as his characters, the author makes an excellent, lively subject for a solo show. Unfortunately, this isn't that show. Teti, who also wrote the script and appeared in a 2012 People's Light and Theatre production as Twain, dons the white linen suit, white hair and iconic droopy moustache again here.
SPORTS
August 23, 2013 | BY PAUL DOMOWITCH
MICHAEL VICK and DeSean Jackson did something after practice yesterday that they rarely did in the 4 years they played together under Andy Reid. They watched film together. No, they didn't sneak out of the NovaCare Complex to go watch "Kick-Ass 2" or "Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters. " They found a quiet room and reviewed some defensive video of the Eagles' third preseason opponent, the Jacksonville Jaguars. While watching film is mandatory for a quarterback, it's never been high on Jackson's list of priorities.
NEWS
April 24, 2013
By Tobias Peter Terrorism is like cancer. If you've ever suffered from it, there are things you remember. Like the fear of dying. And the fear that it can always return - even after years of remission. It leaves scars, like the ones left after the attacks on New York and Washington on Sept. 11, 2001, which left more than a few scratches on the great American soul. After last week's attack on the Boston Marathon, the angst is back. However, while America might be more vulnerable than other nations, it is also psychologically stronger than many of them - both for exactly the same reason.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
HOLY SEQUESTRATION, BATMAN! Calm down, Robin. It arrives today, a Death Star launched by leaders of the Planet of the Apes, a/k/a Congress, described by Mark Twain as "the smallest minds and the selfishest souls and the cowardliest hearts that God makes. " Sequestration supposedly is so deadly a doomsday device that rational people would not let it happen - but who says Congress is rational? Mark Twain again: "Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
ELLEN DeGENERES was hailed as a trailblazer Monday night as she received the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor at the Kennedy Center, in Washington. The show will be broadcast Oct. 30 on PBS stations. When DeGeneres first heard that she was receiving the same honor that Bill Cosby , Tina Fey and Will Ferrell won in recent years, she joked, "It really makes me wonder . . . why didn't I get this sooner?" More than just 'Avatar' Deep-sea explorer James Cameron has come up from beneath the sea. The director of "Aliens," "Terminator 2," "Titanic" and "Avatar," has picked up movie rights to The Informationist , a novel by Taylor Stevens , whose main female character has been compared with Lisbeth Salander, "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
On the speaking circuit of 19th-century America, no one commanded greater audiences than Mark Twain. The author of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer crisscrossed the country, reading his books to sold-out crowds. Wendy Bable's Mark Twain: Sacred Cows Make the Best Hamburgers builds on this. She sets her play in 1904, the self-proclaimed last lecture of Twain's first annual final farewell tour. This sets the tone for the evening: a bit whimsical, with a hint of Twain's sardonic, bubble-bursting humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | Howard Gensler
IT'S BEEN QUITE a week for gays: "The New Normal" was picked up by NBC; the "E! True Hollywood Story" for Joan and Melissa Rivers aired on Mother's Day; the president came out in favor of gay marriage; and Ellen DeGeneres was named the winner of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. Ellen is being honored for her stand-up work, daytime show, activism and books. According to the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in D.C., recipients of the Mark Twain Prize are "people who have had an impact on American society in ways similar to the distinguished 19th-century novelist and essayist Samuel Clemens.
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