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Market Forces

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NEWS
May 19, 1987 | By Edward J. Stemmler
The sharp decline in the number of young men and women electing to study medicine has been explained by some as a reaction to market forces. Medical schools, the reasoning goes, are educating more physicians than the nation needs to care for its citizenry, now and into the future. And the applicant pool, which has dropped from 2.8 applicants per seat to fewer than 2 per seat in a little more than a decade, simply has responded to market demand. But more than market forces are at work.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | By Alexander Cockburn
Earth Day, which traces its origins to 1970, is upon us, and to celebrate today's event, the liberal San Francisco-based periodical Mother Jones, bible of the herbivores, runs in its new issue a vast piece by Paul Hawken. Anyone interested in where green liberalism is headed these days should take a look. Hawken, half the partnership that puts out the Smith & Hawken catalog offering teak-handled mulching forks to the organic gardeners of the ritzier suburbs, has lately flowered as a guru in the tradition of Charles Reich, author of that best-seller of the 1970s, The Greening of America.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | By David Cho, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Citing cuts in federal funds and a harsh financial environment for hospitals, Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center announced 47 layoffs yesterday and the planned closure of its mental health unit. Alexander J. Hatala, president and chief executive officer of Our Lady of Lourdes Health Care Services Inc., the parent company of the medical center, said he was confident that patients of the mental health unit could be handled by other hospitals, including nearby Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center, which Lourdes is negotiating to acquire.
NEWS
December 15, 1996
Remember the television-commercial couple, Harry and Louise, and their kitchen-table frets over the Clinton health-care plan? How these fictional yuppies worried that their hands would be tied when it came to seeing their favorite doctor! How they cringed at the expected high cost, and slipshod oversight, of a huge bureaucracy! To hear Harry and Louise tell it, the government was nothing less than an elephant set to rampage through the comfy and familiar waiting room of their family physician.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plans to merge two Camden hospital systems - the Cooper Health System and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center - have been indefinitely postponed, officials said yesterday. Word of the postponement came just three weeks after Lourdes announced dozens of layoffs and other cutbacks. The merger of the hospitals, at opposite ends of Haddon Avenue, had been in the works for months, and an agreement was supposed to have been signed a month ago. Yesterday, officials cited "market forces" for delaying talks.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Right about now, foes of 2010's health-care reform are gleefully pointing to the law's rocky rollout as evidence for Ronald Reagan's famous declaration that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. " Even some Obamacare supporters worry it's a sign that government can't get things right. But before you fall for a notion that helps too many Americans gloss over the government's achievements - say, Social Security, Medicare, and the moon landings - you might want to consider the epiphany reported recently by University of Chicago economist Neale Mahoney.
NEWS
October 18, 2001
Security, questioning authority, censorship As a former chief of police for two airports deemed to be of the highest security risk and as a former president of the Airport Law Enforcement Information Network, I believe that federalizing the security screen is a mistake (Editorial, Oct. 13). I agree that leaving the security in the hands of the airlines and private security is not desirable, but to create a monster bureaucracy to replace the present system is less desirable.
NEWS
December 29, 2004
NOTE TO Mayor Street and Gov. Rendell, both of whom have made noises in the last few days that they'd offer help to the troubled US Airways after a Christmas-operations fiasco that stranded thousands of passengers and their baggage: Not so fast. The facts are still emerging on what caused the massive lost-luggage crisis - the airline is blaming its workers for staging a sick-out, and workers are blaming the company - but it's hard not to draw some bleak conclusions. For example, we know that the company recently filed for bankruptcy for a second time, and part of the restructuring led to huge wage concessions from unions.
NEWS
January 13, 1997
It's bad practice for doctors to treat for their own aches and pains, yet the health-care industry in Pennsylvania has been all but left in its own care. And the patient's symptoms, as sketched out in recent headlines, aren't ones to ignore: Up to 40,000 health-care workers in this region could be job-hunting over the next five years as the medical marketplace becomes leaner. Intense competition for lucrative medical services, coupled with moves to brake public spending on medical care for the poor, could jolt the finances of hospitals serving the state's poor.
NEWS
May 30, 1990
Let's stop pretending. We Americans don't give a rat's ravaged rump for equality of opportunity. We care - even those of us making speeches about their rights - still less about the unborn. Saying otherwise is just a meaningless mantra, lips moving with a presidential cynicism. How else can we explain that more than half the states are cutting back the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children? WIC feeds pregnant women and their children who are at high risk of malnutrition.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Right about now, foes of 2010's health-care reform are gleefully pointing to the law's rocky rollout as evidence for Ronald Reagan's famous declaration that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. " Even some Obamacare supporters worry it's a sign that government can't get things right. But before you fall for a notion that helps too many Americans gloss over the government's achievements - say, Social Security, Medicare, and the moon landings - you might want to consider the epiphany reported recently by University of Chicago economist Neale Mahoney.
NEWS
March 21, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Flaim family have been growing eggplants in the sandy Cumberland County soil of their Vineland farm for 76 years, nurturing tiny seedlings into five-foot-tall plants that bear more than 20 fruits each. Most will be sold as usual to wholesale buyers or at farmers' markets. This year, 15 percent will find their way into freezer cases in specialty stores and cafeterias throughout the region. For the last two seasons, the Flaims have been processing the eggplant as breaded cutlets in boxes with the state's Jersey Fresh label, which tells customers they are eating local and is generally reserved for fresh produce.
NEWS
November 10, 2009 | By Elizabeth Bryan and Katrina Anderson
Transportation strikes are not new to Philadelphia; SEPTA workers have gone on strike nine times since 1975. The latest example, which ended yesterday, was anything but a fight for the working class. The union's demands were well beyond the means of SEPTA and state taxpayers. The typical SEPTA union employee earns $52,000 per year - $15,000 more than the median annual salary of Philadelphia workers. The city's unemployment rate reached 11 percent in September, and the number of jobless residents had almost doubled since December 2007.
LIVING
October 21, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The grand ballroom at the Capital Hilton glowed neon purple, and Idol-er David Archuleta's "Crush" pulsed from giant speakers. Less than a mile from the White House, the First National Tween Girl Summit - yes, summit - was under way. The event was part serious confab, part sparkly hearts and butterflies - just like its audience. That would be those conflicted wannabe teens (but not quite there yet) - the 8- to 12-year-olds known as tweens. On this recent Saturday, 250 girls came from across the country, including the Philadelphia region, to speak out on issues that mattered most to them.
REAL_ESTATE
October 21, 2007 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
When is landscape lighting not just about lighting? When it becomes an important ingredient of curb appeal, says a lighting company "outdoor living expert" who contacted me recently. This was just the latest snowball in the avalanche of story pitches I've been getting from manufacturers trying to offer their products as routes out of the real estate slowdown. So, please, disregard the market forces affecting residential real estate - tighter credit, too much inventory, overproduction of new homes, too many flippers invading and then fleeing, and the fact that most Americans seemed to think they were living in cash registers and now the till is practically empty and the bill is due. Go buy some lights.
REAL_ESTATE
August 12, 2007 | By Joanne Cleaver, MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL
It's a sprawling Arts and Crafts house, with a brand-new kitchen, a brand-new master suite, and vintage details like leaded-glass windows in the built-in china cabinet. Last fall, David and Elizabeth Rubin put it on the market for $475,000. Now they're asking $439,000 - a price that reflects a loss on the $100,000 they've spent on remodeling. With no takers, they're now offering the house on Milwaukee's east side for sale one month at a time: If a qualified buyer is amenable, the Rubins will consider offering the house on a rent-to-own basis.
NEWS
July 6, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rick Olivieri should have been smiling. After all, the National Education Association's 9,000 delegates were in town, and the lines at Rick's Philly Steaks were longer than usual as folks wandered by his big, enticing window on the 12th Street side of the Reading Terminal Market. Instead, Olivieri was on the phone to lawyers, business associates and friends, trying to figure out if his family's 25-year reign in that corner of the venerable market will come to an end on July 31. That's the deadline managers of the 104-year-old market gave Olivieri on June 28. Sometime this fall, market managers will bring in a "fresh face," Tony Luke's Old Philly Style Sandwiches - he of the stellar Zagat's rating as well as appearances in the ring, recordings and film.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The proposed multimillion-dollar redevelopment of the Pennsauken Mart site - with its planned upscale hotel, conference center and amphitheater - could be negatively affected by the downturn in the housing market, Camden County officials yesterday. The Camden County Improvement Authority today is expected to approve a 28-day extension of talks with Atlanta-based Beazer Homes to finish detailing the plans. Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. said Beazer had asked for the additional time "to complete studies related to the project.
NEWS
April 8, 2006
One for the books Re: "Cohen hits the books: $28,200 worth," April 2: While reading the article, I thought that maybe I was Bill Murray's character in Groundhog Day, only it was April Fool's Day being played over again instead. Did State Rep. Mark Cohen really spend $28,200 of taxpayer's money on his personal book collection? Being a self-described "voracious reader" is one thing. But foisting the bill on the taxpayers is something else. Did we pay for his bookshelves as well?
BUSINESS
August 27, 2005 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The soaring price of gasoline has rekindled debate across America over whether prices for gas should be regulated as they are for electricity and water. On Thursday, Hawaii will become the first state to cap the wholesale price of gasoline - that is, the price paid by gas stations. These retailers generally pass along price hikes to consumers. Hawaii's price ceiling will be set anew each Wednesday by taking the average of spot-market prices for gas in Los Angeles, New York and the U.S. Gulf Coast.
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