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BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Philly should be throwing a parade for Scott Kesterson, or at least buying him a snort of his favorite bourbon, Michter's. It's not every day that a small business moves across the country to Philadelphia. Even more rare is when the owner of that business has no personal ties here. "I never thought I'd be a Northeast guy," said the native of southern Oregon. Research is what led Kesterson, 51, to relocate his Spatial Terra, a four-year-old company specializing in a complex blend of market research, risk-mitigation analysis, and consulting, from Portland - a city often associated with progressiveness - to Philadelphia - a city that consistently does not score well in national rankings of best places for small business.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
This year, says Patrick Baldasare, hundreds of thousands of Americans will become victims of a "sugging" - and he's upset about it. Sugging? The term originated in England. "Sug" is short for Selling Under the Guise of market research. It refers to a telemarketing practice in which the caller claims to be conducting a survey, when the real object of the call is to sell something. As Baldasare sees it: "This is unethical and an injustice to the public. " It is also hurting his business.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2006 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Timothy J. Mahoney has decided to flip the land on which he planned to build the city's tallest residential skyscraper. Real estate experts say the 22,433-square-foot plot could fetch $60 million because, after six years of market research and planning - and three years of legal wrangling - Mahoney has a clearly established right to build a 57-story tower at 1441 Chestnut St., just off the Avenue of the Arts. "The market has come to him. There has been a tremendous amount of unsolicited interest in buying the project," said Robert Fahey, executive vice president of CB Richard Ellis Inc., the real estate firm hired by Mahoney, an Ardmore developer, and his partner, Brook J. Lenfest.
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The summer of 1996 officially ended this weekend. It may be remembered for many things: rain, a horrible plane crash, more rain, and the triumph of marketing over everything else. What the summer will not be remembered for is indelible entertainment, sports or politics. This past summer was the one packed thick with big events: the Olympics, political conventions, very expensive movies. But big events, especially those ruled by marketing and polling predicting human behavior, do not make for memorable moments.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Biscardi, 45, of Jim Thorpe, Pa., an Internet technology innovator and Philadelphia native, died Friday, Nov. 13, of injuries sustained in an auto accident in Penn Forest Township, Carbon County. Mr. Biscardi was alone in his car just before 8 p.m. when the vehicle left the right side of Behrens Road and struck a tree, according to state police at Lehighton. No other cars were involved. The accident was under investigation. Born in 1970, Mr. Biscardi, known as "Richie," grew up in the shadow of Veterans Stadium in South Philadelphia and lived in the city until moving to Jim Thorpe this summer.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In a bold move aimed at making Philadelphia a compelling stop on the opera-lover circuit, Opera Philadelphia is restructuring its season to create an opera festival each September that would draw tens of thousands not just to the Academy of Music but to other venues around the city as well. The first festival, in 2017, will mount six productions over 12 days, giving listeners a chance to package experiences traditional and/or edgy - including Komische Oper Berlin's innovative production of The Magic Flute that immerses live singers in fields of animation, newly created works that test the definition of the genre, and a recital by much-adored American soprano Sondra Radvanovsky that promises to be a particularly hot ticket.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A small Texas pharmaceutical company that is building a sales and marketing headquarters in Blue Bell has won Food and Drug Administration approval for a first-of-a-kind treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in patients 6 years and older. Neos Therapeutics Inc. secured final FDA approval late Wednesday for Adzenys, the first oral tablet for ADHD that dissolves in the mouth in less than 30 seconds, and does not require swallowing a pill or capsule. Adzenys is an amphetamine and the bioequivalent of Shire PLC's Adderall XR, said the company, whose local operation is headed by a former Shire employee.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1996 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
DiMark Inc., a Langhorne direct-marketing company with $73.4 million in revenues, will be acquired by Harte-Hanks Communications Inc. in a $155 million stock swap that will create the largest direct-marketing company in the United States. The roughly $15-a-share deal will boost Harte-Hanks' direct-marketing business to more than $300 million a year, said Jack Freeman, director of investment relations for DiMark. Harte-Hanks, of San Antonio, Texas, provides market research and advertising services and publishes six daily newspapers.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | By Jeff McGaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bette Schwartz considers her chronic hay fever to be an annoying fact of life, but at least on Wednesday, it was profitable. For her sniffling, Schwartz, of Philadelphia, earned $40 in two hours as a paid respondent in a market research focus group. She is typical of many of the 50 or so people a week to visit the Philadelphia Focus market research lab in Whitemarsh. They are paid for telling manufacturers what they think of their toilet-bowl-cleaning products, their hay fever medications, the bounciness of their basketballs, the look of their handbags, the appeal of their swing sets or - often - the appeal of the advertisements for such products.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2005 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was all about jeans for many teens shopping for back-to-school clothes at Cherry Hill Mall last week. "I like the ripped jean, and more loose-fitting. Not tight," said Andrea Bialon, 16, of Marlton, who was browsing at the mall's American Eagle Outfitters store with her sister, Amanda. Peasant skirts and T-shirts bearing humorous sayings also are expected to be big sellers in the next few weeks, taking some of the spotlight back from the iPods, laptops and other gadgets that ruled last year.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Philly should be throwing a parade for Scott Kesterson, or at least buying him a snort of his favorite bourbon, Michter's. It's not every day that a small business moves across the country to Philadelphia. Even more rare is when the owner of that business has no personal ties here. "I never thought I'd be a Northeast guy," said the native of southern Oregon. Research is what led Kesterson, 51, to relocate his Spatial Terra, a four-year-old company specializing in a complex blend of market research, risk-mitigation analysis, and consulting, from Portland - a city often associated with progressiveness - to Philadelphia - a city that consistently does not score well in national rankings of best places for small business.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A small Texas pharmaceutical company that is building a sales and marketing headquarters in Blue Bell has won Food and Drug Administration approval for a first-of-a-kind treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in patients 6 years and older. Neos Therapeutics Inc. secured final FDA approval late Wednesday for Adzenys, the first oral tablet for ADHD that dissolves in the mouth in less than 30 seconds, and does not require swallowing a pill or capsule. Adzenys is an amphetamine and the bioequivalent of Shire PLC's Adderall XR, said the company, whose local operation is headed by a former Shire employee.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Biscardi, 45, of Jim Thorpe, Pa., an Internet technology innovator and Philadelphia native, died Friday, Nov. 13, of injuries sustained in an auto accident in Penn Forest Township, Carbon County. Mr. Biscardi was alone in his car just before 8 p.m. when the vehicle left the right side of Behrens Road and struck a tree, according to state police at Lehighton. No other cars were involved. The accident was under investigation. Born in 1970, Mr. Biscardi, known as "Richie," grew up in the shadow of Veterans Stadium in South Philadelphia and lived in the city until moving to Jim Thorpe this summer.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In a bold move aimed at making Philadelphia a compelling stop on the opera-lover circuit, Opera Philadelphia is restructuring its season to create an opera festival each September that would draw tens of thousands not just to the Academy of Music but to other venues around the city as well. The first festival, in 2017, will mount six productions over 12 days, giving listeners a chance to package experiences traditional and/or edgy - including Komische Oper Berlin's innovative production of The Magic Flute that immerses live singers in fields of animation, newly created works that test the definition of the genre, and a recital by much-adored American soprano Sondra Radvanovsky that promises to be a particularly hot ticket.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
By all available market research on the matter (which is to say, none), only the early-music researcher or budding Latin scholar could stand a chance of getting ensnared by Anonymous 4. Which is why market research belongs nowhere near anyone making decisions about artists and repertoire. To the modern ear, the pace of chord change and melodic progress in much of Anonymous 4's repertoire might be about as gripping as watching the growth of certain molds. And yet, the female a cappella quartet has sold two million recordings since forming in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
RADIO STATION B101 will be no more Dec. 26. But it's only the name that's retiring. The station will be known as MoreFM at 101.1. The format of the station will not change, the DJs won't change, the place on the dial won't change. Just the name. In a statement, station owner Jerry Lee said the name change did not reflect poor ratings. And he's right. B101 consistently dominates in the Philadelphia radio market, a feat for an independently owned station. Instead, Lee thought of the change as a branding update.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Daniel Wagner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. holiday retail sales this year grew at the weakest pace since 2008, when the nation was in a deep recession. In 2012, the shopping season was disrupted by bad weather and consumers' rising uncertainty about the economy. A report that tracks spending on popular holiday goods, the MasterCard Advisors SpendingPulse, said Tuesday that sales in the two months before Christmas increased 0.7 percent, compared with last year. Many analysts had expected holiday sales to grow 3 percent to 4 percent.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Few of us make a ripple in the grand river of time. We may leave descendants, some possessions passed along to subsequent generations. Steve Jobs, who died Wednesday at age 56, was not that sort of person. What he did, who he was, changed our lives, altering the landscape of technology, communication, and entertainment. He was the bend in the river. He imagined our future through brilliant marketing, making progress tangible and tactile. "You can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
WHILE federal regulators spent last weekend unsuccessfully hunting for the cause of last Thursday's momentary financial meltdown, I was monitoring a classic American enterprise. It featured a partnership agreement, product development and market research, not to mention an advertising plan, pricing strategy, concessions, negotiations and money-handling. Unlike the current financial markets and their fluctuations, this one didn't require a Ph.D. in economics to follow. It was a yard sale run largely by our three sons, ages 9, 12 and 14. Weeks ago, I'd proposed that they manage the sale with a twofold purpose: first, to relieve our garage and attic of all the stuff we'd accumulated but didn't need or want.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2009 | By Roslyn Rudolph INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
IMS Health Inc., which provides market research to the pharmaceutical and health-care industries, said yesterday that it agreed to be acquired for $5.2 billion, including the assumption of debt. The buyers are private-equity firm TPG Capital and the investment board of the Canada Pension Plan. IMS headquarters are in Norwalk, Conn., but its major employment center - with about 1,000 people - is in Blue Bell. The company employs 7,500 people globally, but it is still completing 850 job cuts announced in July.
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