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Market Share

SPORTS
May 24, 2014 | By Ken Weingartner, For The Inquirer
Market Share heads to Sunday's $250,000 Maxie Lee Memorial Invitational at Harrah's Philadelphia looking to bounce back from an uncharacteristic break in the Cutler Memorial last weekend. In 40 previous career races, Market Share went off stride only once - when he lost a shoe in the 2012 Dexter Cup. In the Cutler, Market Share made a break heading into the first turn as he raced alongside eventual winner Sebastian K. The Cutler featured the much-anticipated encounter between the two-time Dan Patch Award-winning Market Share and the 2012 Swedish Horse of the Year Sebastian K. Both had won their respective Cutler eliminations, Market Share in 1:50.3 and Sebastian K in a world-record-equaling 1:50.1.
SPORTS
May 16, 2014 | By Ken Weingartner, For The Inquirer
Market Share will not head to Sweden to race in the Elitlopp at the end of the month, and a Swedish horse is one of the reasons the two-time Dan Patch Award winner is staying home. Richard Gutnick, who heads the Market Share ownership group, said the 5-year-old trotter will race in Saturday's $175,000 Arthur J. Cutler Memorial final at Meadowlands Racetrack and then point toward the Maxie Lee Memorial Invitational on May 25 at Harrah's Philadelphia. The Elitlopp also is May 25. The reasons for the decision were the demands of racing and traveling, not to mention the budding of a potential rivalry with 2012 Swedish Horse of the Year Sebastian K. Sebastian K made his North American debut Saturday night, winning his Cutler elimination in a world-record-equaling 1:50.1 mile at the Meadowlands.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cargoes were up 15.1 percent in 2013 in the Port of Philadelphia, the fourth consecutive year for gains and an indicator the economy is recovering, officials said. More steel, more paper, more cocoa beans, and more sugar accounted for the increase. Total tonnage: 5.1 million. The year was not all rosy. Unconventional cargoes, known as "project cargoes," were down 10.8 percent. Automobile imports from Hyundai and Kia were down 9.8 percent, due in part to labor strife in South Korea and Japanese automakers' bouncing back to regain market share, said Robert Blackburn, the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority's senior deputy executive director.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
This evening about 6:30 in East Rutherford, N.J., a soprano from the Metropolitan Opera will join the NFL. Televised to more than 100 million listeners, she will sail "The Star-Spangled Banner" aloft with operatic vibrato, and by Monday morning all of America will be so stirred by her voice that apps will collapse under the strain of the sudden demand for Verdi and Wagner. Scratch that. Authorities have charged a pair of New Jersey Metallica fans with organizing a massive classical-music ticket-scalping scheme after hearing pianist Lang Lang rocking out with the heavy metal band on last Sunday's Grammy broadcast.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul Steinke, 49, became general manager of the Reading Terminal Market in 2001, a voice in his head cautioned him that he might be joining a dying institution. Hard to imagine why, considering that the market, especially crowded around big food holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter, attracts 115,000 visitors a week. One of America's oldest and largest public markets, it is also one of the city's top tourist attractions. Question: What worried you in 2001?
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move that caught shareholders, creditors, analysts, and the airline industry by surprise, the U.S. Justice Department; six states, including Pennsylvania; and the District of Columbia sued Tuesday to block the merger of US Airways and American Airlines. No one saw it coming, two days before a federal bankruptcy judge in New York City was scheduled to approve American's reorganization plan. The news sent airline stocks tumbling. American's creditors, along with shareholders of both airlines and European Union regulators, had given a green light to the $11 billion deal.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radian Group Inc., a Center City mortgage insurer, said Wednesday that July was its biggest month ever, a sign of strength in the housing market and a shift in the industry that has benefited private mortgage insurers. The company insured $5.3 billion worth of home mortgages in July, 58 percent more than July 2013 and five times more than the low in 2010 of $959 million. "We're really excited about reaching a point in July where we had our highest writing month of new insurance in the history of the company," said Teresa Bryce Bazemore, president of Radian Guaranty Inc., Radian's mortgage-insurance arm. "We've been through - as has pretty much any company that's in the housing market - a very difficult period of time, lots of losses," Bazemore said.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | Associated Press
Auxilium Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Chesterbrook, reported disappointing first-quarter sales on Monday and said it is spending $585 million to buy a urology drug company. Auxilium said sales of its two approved drugs, Xiaflex and Testim, both decreased because of lower sales in the U.S. It said both drugs appear to be losing market share and reduced its sales expectations for both products. The company also said it bought Actient Holdings LLC from private equity firm GTCR for $585 million.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
Q: Might a company that rakes in a lot of money still be a bad investment? - L.D., Worcester, Mass.   A: It's possible. Remember that the money a company takes in (its revenue, or sales) is its top line. Before you get to its bottom line of profits, you have to take out expenses, such as salaries, supplies and taxes. It's critical to know how much (if anything) the company keeps as profit, and whether important numbers, such as sales and profits, are increasing. Arch Coal, for example, has had average annual revenue growth of more than 12 percent over the last five years, and growth has accelerated.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The University of Pennsylvania Health System's tentative deal to acquire Chester County Hospital in West Chester may be a move to block competitors from gaining control of a lucrative patient market, health-care experts say. "I suspect that part of the reason was they didn't want it to fall into somebody else's hands," said Mark V. Pauly, a health-care economist at the University of Pennsylvania. Pauly said he had no inside information. The two organizations said Friday that they had signed a nonbinding letter of intent, allowing Penn to delve more deeply into Chester County Hospital's weakened financial condition and work more broadly with the hospital community on a merger agreement.
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