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NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
OLD CITY The Shirt Corner and the Suit Corner buildings had been through a lot during their nearly 200 years at Third and Market Streets, but somehow they always found a way to adapt. Only two months ago, the two were still inseparable companions, still standing eyeball-to-eyeball, still trying to outdo each other with their blazing, red-white-and-blue facade graphics. Today, the Suit Corner, on the southwest corner, is a smoldering ruin, its roof gone, its timbers charred black from Wednesday's fire.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
THE CITY Department of Licenses & Inspection issued three citations Wednesday against a building on Market Street near 7th owned by Yechiel, Nahman and Michael Lichtenstein, who also owned the Kensington building that burned last week, killing two firefighters. An L&I spokeswoman said the fire prompted a review of all Lichtenstein properties, leading to the new citations on Market Street, which included operating a multifamily dwelling without a housing-inspection license, failing to keep fire-alarm-testing records and certificates on site, and improperly maintaining the facade.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police were looking yesterday for the man who shot two young men in the 1300 block of Market Street shortly after 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Police said the assailant used a .22-caliber pistol to shoot Harold Roberts, 18, of the 2600 block of North 11th Street, and Maxie Everett, 19, of the 2300 block of West Diamond Street, after a quarrel. Both men were taken to Hahnemann University Hospital. Roberts, who was wounded in the head, was listed in guarded condition yesterday. Everett, who was shot in the right knee, was listed in good condition.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
A knife-wielding man slashed wildly at police officers who chased him through five Market Street blocks crowded with rush-hour pedestrians yesterday before subduing him after a struggle, police said. The man kept threatening, "I'm going to kill you," and "I'm going to kill the mayor," police said. Police arrested him at 7th and Market streets, after flogging him with nightsticks. Four police officers suffered minor injuries in the struggle. The suspect, James Wood, 43, of Keim Street near Westmoreland, Juniata Park, was cut on the head, but refused hospital treatment.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
ON MAY 13, 1985, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb on a West Philly rowhouse. Eleven people died and 61 homes went up in flames. Within a week, then-Mayor Wilson Goode agreed to appoint an independent commission to investigate exactly how and why the Police Department's final confrontation with the MOVE fringe group escalated to catastrophe. It has been four months and 19 days since the collapse of 2140 Market St. killed six people and injured 13. So far, all we have is the promise that Mayor Nutter will appoint a similar independent commission to examine how the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections might have averted the tragedy.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE WOMAN whose legs were amputated after being trapped for 13 hours beneath rubble from the Market Street building collapse filed a lawsuit yesterday, claiming several parties ignored signs of the impending danger. Mariya Plekan, 52, of Hunting Park, was shopping at the Salvation Army store when a three-story wall fell onto the store the morning of June 5. Firefighters pulled Plekan from under the debris shortly before midnight. The suit says that, as a result of the catastrophe, Plekan's entire lower body has been removed.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
The new home of the Philadelphia Inquirer, Daily News and philly.com at 801 Market Street opened for business today. Newsroom employees for the Inquirer and philly.com started unpacking this morning and will be followed later this week by their colleagues from the Daily News. Operations of the three news organizations are being consolidated on the third floor at the former Strawbridge and Clothier Department Store Building. The move was necessitated by the sale of their previous home, the iconic white tower at 400 N. Broad Street, to developer Bart Blatstein by the news organizations' previous owners, Philadelphia Media Network.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $60 million deal to sell a large piece of Center City real estate to the owner of the Gallery at Market East is nearly complete, helping pave the way for a planned redevelopment of the long-struggling urban shopping mall, officials said Monday. Vornado Realty Trust of Paramus, N.J., in an announcement made on a stormy day that idled markets and major businesses along the East Coast, said it had entered into an agreement to sell 907 Market St. to Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust, a shopping mall company headquartered in Center City.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a Marshalls store set to open next month on East Market Street, the area around the Gallery in Center City is cementing its position as a discount district. "It's about the thrill of the hunt," said Wharton School retailing professor Erin Armendinger, describing the allure of such stores as Marshalls, Ross Dress for Less, and Burlington Coat Factory. What the new store will do for the luster of Market Street, or the lack of it, remains to be seen. "You have to remember that Market Street East was in pretty bad shape," said Michael Katz, senior vice president of the firm that owns Marshalls' building.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
OLD CITY The Shirt Corner and the Suit Corner buildings had been through a lot during their nearly 200 years at Third and Market Streets, but somehow they always found a way to adapt. Only two months ago, the two were still inseparable companions, still standing eyeball-to-eyeball, still trying to outdo each other with their blazing, red-white-and-blue facade graphics. Today, the Suit Corner, on the southwest corner, is a smoldering ruin, its roof gone, its timbers charred black from Wednesday's fire.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dean Adler of Lubert-Adler Partners says he and Ron Caplan of PMC Property Group have agreed to pay $42 million to New York-based Loeb Partners for the Marketplace Design Center at 2400 Market St., the building with the whales painted on the side visible from the Schuylkill Expressway. "It's right in the middle of the Market Street Corridor, Rittenhouse Square, and University City," Adler told me Thursday. He says the partners hope to keep the Design Center businesses in place, in a consolidated area, along with the telecom server farms that use part of the building; add "creative office space" for tech companies in some of the vacant areas; and top the building with a "mid-rise" apartment tower, as Caplan and Adler have done at the former AAA MidAtlantic building three blocks away at 2040 Market St. "It's a former car factory, and the roof is 80 feet up, where you get magnificent views of the river," Adler added.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
The operators of the Loews Philadelphia went far beyond the mere idea of swapping out restaurants as part of a renovation of the hotel. Designers cut a front entrance to Market Street and created a new lobby lounge out of part of the former SoleFood restaurant. This space has a large-screen TV and a bar that backs into the new restaurant, Bank & Bourbon (1200 Market St., 215-231-7300), which opened officially this week. Bank & Bourbon - the "bank" refers to the building's past as PSFS and the "bourbon" refers to a neat spirits program - is a contemporary, tastefully done showplace for chef Tom Harkins, whose American menu is built on local sourcing.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Aubrey Whelan, and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gary Ginsberg, owner of the Suit Corner, stood on the north side of Market Street on Wednesday morning, facing reporters. Behind him, his family business burned. "All these years at Third and Market, going down to an end," he said as firefighters fought the two-alarm blaze. "I just can't believe this is happening. . . . It just went up in smoke. " Within a month, two Old City haberdasheries connected by blood, architectural motif, and outlandish retail style had been destroyed in spectacular fashion.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA & MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
This story has been updated. A WEST PHILLY couple is accused of kidnapping an elderly woman and draining her bank account Monday, police said. And it may not be the first time they've allegedly preyed on such a victim. Vickson Korlewala, 57, and Lorpu Korlewala, 51, were arrested today and charged with robbery, kidnapping and related offenses after the victim, 80, identified them to detectives from the Southwest Detective Division, a police source said. The pair denied their involvement in the kidnapping.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Robert Calandra and Don Sapatkin, For The Inquirer
For anyone who hadn't heard, Lady B was shouting it over the air Monday afternoon. "I want to tell people one more time that today is the deadline, the deadline, the deadline to get your health coverage," Lady B, who is known as Wendy Clark in real life, told her listeners at Philadelphia's WRNB (100.3-FM). They heard. With triple the traffic of the previous record on Healthcare.gov, Monday had the potential to confirm wildly divergent points of view - that new glitches on the Obamacare website showcased the administration's ineptness or that the clamor for coverage proved that the president's signature initiative was on target.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a sweeping $500 million-plus project aimed at finally upgrading Philadelphia's worn downtown retail district and spreading Center City's apartment revival east of Broad Street, a development group says it plans to demolish a modest block of stores on Market Street between 11th and 12th - and eventually level or renovate the rest of the block down to Chestnut Street - in favor of a new retail/residential complex. Developers of the complex, to be called East Market, are two Philadelphia concerns, backed by Washington and New York firms.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER & SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
THE SIGN on the fence at 3rd and Market streets in Old City reads: HARD HATS REQUIRED ON SITE . Maybe they should be required everywhere in Philadelphia? A wall of the early-19th-century building that had housed the Shirt Corner store unexpectedly buckled about 1:20 p.m. yesterday, setting off a chain reaction of collapses that generated a massive dust plume, crushed the fence surrounding the demolition site and sprayed bricks onto the sidewalk across 3rd Street. No injuries were reported, but the building collapse - at least the sixth in Philadelphia in the last month - sent pedestrians scurrying from the intersection.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seems the developers of a proposed 35-story tower for Market Street East were too successful in their attempt to keep the building unobtrusive. While the largely residential structure proposed for the site of the historic Lit Bros. store was tentatively approved Tuesday by the Philadelphia Historical Commission's architectural committee, the panel requested a redesign of the $102 million project. Committee members agreed with a critique by the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia that the design is "inappropriately bland" for a structure that would share the block with such an architectural standout as Lit Bros.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you hide a 35-story building? That was the task given Stantec Architecture Inc. when commissioned to design a new residential tower on the site of the historic Lit Brothers store. The hope was that the $102 million proposed tower would hardly be visible from Market Street and certainly would not detract from the Renaissance Revival facade that remains of the Lit Brothers store. The Philadelphia Historic Commission will assess Stantec's efforts Tuesday when the plan for the proposed Mellon Independence Center Tower is reviewed by the commission's architectural committee.
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