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Market Street

NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Bible Society will give up its tony Broadway address for one in Philadelphia's historic district. The society, which has had its headquarters in New York City for 199 years and has operations all over the world, will relocate to 401 Market St., steps from Independence Mall. Mayor Nutter will announce the nonprofit's move, which will bring more than 200 jobs to the city, at a news conference Wednesday. The society's primary mission is to engage more people with the Bible.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bank of New York Mellon is reducing its presence in its namesake Market Street building by 80 percent, amid staff cuts and a general trend among office tenants to take up less space. The New York-based bank will vacate in September 184,000 square feet that it uses at the BNY Mellon Center at 1735 Market St., said David Weinberg, chief operating officer of Equity Commonwealth, the building's owner. The bank signed an 11-year renewal prior to March 31 for its remaining 48,000 square feet in the building, Weinberg said in a call Thursday with analysts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two hours behind schedule, Beth Heinly finally located a working electrical outlet in the echoing cavern of the Broad Street concourse and settled in, wearing a puffy chef's hat, to cook pasta. The mac-and-cheese giveaway was Heinly's take on site-specific performance art - meant to engage a space that mostly lies vacant, except for occasional skateboarders, scuttling rainy-day commuters, and covert smokers of marijuana. "I wanted to do a really loving thing in a scary place," she said.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE BOY HELD the flier in front of him and spoke. "My name is Marc Gildersleeve," he said. "Please help me find my dad, and if you know any information, please call. " He was poised. He was steady. And he broke our hearts. Just a day earlier, the 13-year-old's father, Bob Gildersleeve Jr., dropped him off at lacrosse practice and boarded Amtrak Train 188 from Baltimore to New York for a business trip. Usually his father, a vice president of sales for Ecolab, a food-safety-hygiene company, traveled by plane.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Maria Panaritis, and Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Before he decided to reinvent the grim Gallery at Market East as a fashion outlet, Joseph Coradino considered converting it into a standard, suburban-style mall. The CEO of the Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust also thought about making it into a giant restaurant-and-entertainment venue, or even a full-price high-fashion mall. But none seemed right for a Market East corridor that had grown decrepit, but now bloomed with new money, construction, and hope. Coradino combined elements of all three to create a vision for the Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia, a $575 million development whose unveiling last week ended years of speculation about the future of the property.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can the Schuylkill ever play a role like the Chicago River or Paris' Seine - a source of beauty and vitality that unites riverside neighborhoods like Center City and University City rather than dividing them? It's a decades-old dream, but key pieces are finally falling into place, according to civic leaders and developers who joined a panel discussion Tuesday at the Union League sponsored by the Central Philadelphia Development Corp. On both sides of the river, new projects such as Brandywine Realty Trust's 47-story FMC Tower at 30th and Walnut Streets and PMC Property Group's million-square-foot complex planned at 2400 Market St. are paying closer attention than their predecessors to the streetscape and river.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A Philadelphia taxi ride used to be one of those luxurious indulgences where you could escape, however briefly, from your over-scheduled life and spend a few precious minutes staring out the window, lost in thought. Now every trip begins with a backseat television screen laying claim to your eyeballs. At least you still have the option of hitting the off button. If a bill sponsored by Councilman Mark Squilla is put to a final vote later this month, the mere act of walking through the streets of Center City will become a lot like a cab ride, but without the off button.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local real estate firm Arden Group, founded by Craig Spencer, on Tuesday sold the 19-story Center City property 1635 Market Street to New York real estate investment firm Nightingale Properties, for an undisclosed price. Nightingale's CEO, Elie Schwartz, has committed $5 million to renovations, starting immediately. Real estate agents with CBRE in Philadelphia, Kevin Maloney, Mark Adzick, George Cauffman, and Joe Wolff, will market the property. "This is an exciting opportunity for this building.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Mark Fazlollah, and Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the weeks before the deadly Market Street collapse, the building's owner repeatedly warned top city officials and Salvation Army officials that the demolition could endanger the adjacent Salvation Army thrift store. But that did not prompt the city to step in. Nor did it stop the owner from rapidly demolishing the building - with devastating consequences. E-mails and letters reviewed by The Inquirer show repeated warnings about a possible collapse with potentially deadly results.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
It was a year ago last Thursday that Gary Ginsberg stood on Market Street and watched his life go up in flames. All those suits in Crayola colors, all that polyester, all those luminous shirts and wonderfully fat-knotted ties, all that imitation gator skin, just disappearing in the fire. All that family history. Gone. Suit Corner was burning. It had been a cruel stretch. A month earlier, Gary's mother, Linda, had passed. Weeks later, Gary was measuring a customer when across the street his Uncle Marvin's store, Shirt Corner, sold and under demolition, collapsed.
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