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Market Street

NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE WINDOWS on the Nissan Altima were dark - dark enough, it seems, to hide the body of Nadia Malik for at least a day or two. A tip from an anonymous caller to the Marple Township Police Department led Philadelphia cops to inspect the car shortly before 10:30 a.m. yesterday on a slush-rimmed stretch of 30th Street near Market, behind the hulking IRS building. They found Malik, 22, in the front passenger seat. The mother of two from Broomall had been missing since Feb. 9. How she died is a mystery for now. She showed no visible signs of trauma and was fully clothed, said Lt. John Walker, of Southwest Detectives.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The XXX-rated films are gone, along with the customers who trolled the Forum Theater on Market Street seeking public arousal. As videos and the Internet killed porn theaters, the Forum was among the last to die, but it finally closed Nov. 30, giving Philadelphia the opportunity - for the first time in decades - to develop this key link between the city's east and west sides. Richard Basciano, the man behind the proposal to revive the area with new apartments and street-level commercial space, is best known as the king of Times Square porn.
NEWS
May 17, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending decades of divided control of the subterranean realm beneath Center City, SEPTA soon will be in charge of cleaning, maintaining, and repairing almost everything under the streets. That should mean improved cleanliness, lighting, and safety as SEPTA uses new state funding to upgrade the long-neglected passageways, agency officials said Thursday. A new 30-year lease with the city gives SEPTA responsibility for the 3.5 miles of city-owned concourses along Market Street from Eighth to 18th Streets and south to the Walnut-Locust subway station, as well as the elevators and escalators that serve the Broad Street and Market-Frankford Lines.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman who lost her legs after being buried for nearly 13 hours in the Market Street building collapse filed a lawsuit Monday alleging widespread negligence in the catastrophic June 5 accident. Mariya Plekan, a 52-year-old immigrant from Ukraine, was shopping in the Salvation Army thrift shop at 22d and Market Streets when a wall being demolished in the building next door fell onto the store's roof. Plekan suffered devastating injuries "that led to the removal of her entire lower body," the suit says.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
OLD CITY The Shirt Corner and the Suit Corner buildings had been through a lot during their nearly 200 years at Third and Market Streets, but somehow they always found a way to adapt. Only two months ago, the two were still inseparable companions, still standing eyeball-to-eyeball, still trying to outdo each other with their blazing, red-white-and-blue facade graphics. Today, the Suit Corner, on the southwest corner, is a smoldering ruin, its roof gone, its timbers charred black from Wednesday's fire.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The block of Market Street where two buildings collapsed today is not just one of the most blighted stretches remaining in Center City; it is a block where blight was ignored for decades by successive city administrations. The collection of small, decrepit commerical buildings, which includes Hoagie City and the Salvation Army Thrift Store, was once part a larger empire of blight assembled by Philadelphia's most notorious slumlord, Sam Rappaport. Even as the rest of Center City took on a polished gloss, the deteriorated Market Street buildings were among the first things people saw as they entered the city from 30th Street Station.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three alumni of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts are finalists in a competition to create artwork for the proposed memorial park in honor of the six people who died in the destruction of the Salvation Army thrift store last year. The sculptors are Elizabeth Jenkins Culp of Radnor; Barb Fox of Strafford; and Geoffrey Dubinsky of Philadelphia. A selection committee for the 22d and Market Memorial Park will pick a winner, possibly by the end of the summer, said David Brigham, president of PAFA.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Like the prow of a ship, the main facade of Drexel University's new business school at 32d and Market Streets steers toward Center City, straining to narrow the two-block gap between the Schuylkill and its fast-growing campus. In a bit of overt symbolism, the university even relocated a statue of founder Anthony Drexel to the entrance plaza, so he now stands firmly at the helm of this eastward venture. Under its current president, John A. Fry, Drexel has made no secret of its desire to fill that bleak, underutilized space with the sleek towers of a new technology-dominated neighborhood.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
Market Street between 16th and 17th Streets will be closed between 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. today for a Philadelphia Soul Football practice session. Traffic will be allowed to cross Market Street at 16th and 17th streets, but police say motorists should expect backups and delays in the area.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you hide a 35-story building? That was the task given Stantec Architecture Inc. when commissioned to design a new residential tower on the site of the historic Lit Brothers store. The hope was that the $102 million proposed tower would hardly be visible from Market Street and certainly would not detract from the Renaissance Revival facade that remains of the Lit Brothers store. The Philadelphia Historic Commission will assess Stantec's efforts Tuesday when the plan for the proposed Mellon Independence Center Tower is reviewed by the commission's architectural committee.
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