CollectionsMarket Street
IN THE NEWS

Market Street

NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE START where we always have since the deadly Market Street building collapse that killed six people and injured 13 on June 5, 2013 - with the building's Teflon-coated owner, Richard Basciano. And if there is any justice or, perhaps more likely, karma in the world, we will end with Basciano walking down a road to a hell of his own making, paved with excuses. Since an unsupported four-story wall crumbled and crushed the adjacent Salvation Army thrift store at 21st and Market, many have wanted to hear from Basciano, the property owner who had the final say on contracts and decisions, but whose clout and cash kept him insulated from accountability.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai and Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITERS
Authorities were investigating a disturbance of some sort, which initially was reported as a manhole explosion, near 30th and Market Streets in University City on Saturday afternoon. No one was injured, a police spokeswoman said. The reported underground explosion occurred near 30th Street Station, at the northeast corner of 30th and Market, shortly after 1 p.m., a Fire Department dispatcher said. Market Street was closed to vehicular traffic from 29th to 30th Streets because of the investigation.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I'M STARTING to think that Donald Trump is the president we deserve. Seriously. We've spent a lot of time talking about how awful Trump is - no argument here. But can we take a moment to discuss how awful we are to one another? And how Trump, that mean-spirited -ist machine (sexist, racist, misogynist), is really a reflection of us. (Get a mirror, I'll wait.) Trump is us. We are Trump, and that includes those who aren't voting for him. Every day, there is one disturbing story after another about people being awful to one another - and I'm not just talking about Trump supporters' beating or berating protesters.
NEWS
May 10, 2016
To celebrate the first-year success of Indego, Philadelphia's bike-sharing program, its staff recently donned T-shirts sporting the slogan "Inbudget, Incontrol, Independent, Inshape. " Given the soaring popularity of Indego, which saw riders straddle its distinctive teal bicycles more than 420,000 times last year, the day may come when "In Every Zip Code" will be added to that list. But for that to happen, Indego's scope, ambition - and, yes, funding - will have to grow too. It was evident at Indego's first birthday celebration - which took place on the Race Street Pier, complete with a cake-cutting by Mayor Kenney - that there is substantial demand for a bike-sharing system that reaches deeper into city neighborhoods.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
Homesick Philadelphians need not go hungry in the Big Apple. Yes, I'm well aware Manhattan has a few nice places of its own. But, sometimes, a person just needs a little taste of the "215" to keep it real. And NYC has options. Some Really Big Philly Names, in fact, are just about to make more noise in the city, with hummus master Michael Solomonov and another Stephen Starr production set for May openings, plus a new Amada that Jose Garces opened last week. It's too early to know how those projects will fare.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Brandywine Realty Trust plans to demolish an aged industrial building on the 2100 block of Market Street so it can combine the property with surrounding parcels into a large surface parking lot for valet use. The developer has secured permits to tear down the structure at 2126-30 Market St. and is seeking to be excused from zoning rules that prohibit new parking businesses in the area, according to filings on Philadelphia's Department of Licenses and...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
Even if you're just the occasional reader of Jump Start , West Philadelphia native Robb Armstrong's 27-year-old award-winning comic strip, you're likely to assume Armstrong lived quite the charmed life. At the heart of the daily strip, the largest ever syndicated by an African American, is the perfectly nuclear Cobb family, helmed by Philly cop Joe and wife Marcy, an emergency-room nurse. Marcy and Joe have four children: nature-loving daughter Sunny, snarky son Jo-Jo, and a set of fraternal twins.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The developer of East Market, a mixed-use project between 11th and 12th Streets along Market Street, may add 250 more residential units at the site in response to what it sees as strong demand for living spaces in the area. National Real Estate Development managing director Daniel Killinger said during an appearance at the Urban Land Institute conference in Philadelphia Thursday that his company will decide next month whether to pursue the expansion. The new units would add about 20 stories to what has been intended as a two-story retail building at the corner of 12th and Market Streets, Killinger said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
When Jonas Maciunas and Mark Keener were collecting data for the Old City District's new plan, they stumbled across an astonishing statistic. Since 2000, the amount of automobile traffic on Old City's stretch of Market Street has plunged by a third, even as the neighborhood's old cast-iron warehouses were filling up with thousands of new residents . The combination of rising population and declining car use prompted the two planning consultants to...
NEWS
April 21, 2016
ISSUE | DEVELOPMENT Blatstein's towering blunder I concur with Inga Saffron's assessment of Bart Blatstein's development proposal for the site at Broad Street and Washington Avenue ("Green light likely for hated high-rise," Friday). In Philadelphia, retail anywhere other than at street level is doomed. I have lived in Center City for 39 years and have seen: NewMarket, which was situated behind street-front buildings on Second Street, fail to match the more authentic experience of front-and-center retail on nearby South Street; Double-decker retail in the 900 block of South Street fail and be replaced by a successful, street-level Whole Foods.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|