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NEWS
July 24, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MORE THAN a year after a botched demolition on Market Street turned tragic, the official death toll may go up by one. Six people died and 14 more were injured in the immediate aftermath of the June 5, 2013, catastrophe, in which an unsupported wall from the demolition site fell onto an open Salvation Army store next door and crushed those inside. Yesterday, the widow of Danny Johnson, a shopper who was trapped under the rubble and died 23 days later, filed a wrongful-death suit against the property owner, contractor, architect and excavator operator of the demolition, as well as the Salvation Army.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
FOLLOWING through on regulations passed after last year's deadly building collapse on Market Street, Mayor Nutter yesterday unveiled new signage requirements for demolition and construction sites to make it easier for residents to alert the city about unsafe projects. For buildings three stories or higher, contractors must pay for a 3-by-5-foot sign showing a copy of the permit, a rendering of the project, its expected completion date, contact information for the owner and contractor, and instructions for reaching the city.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
SHAFFIAT ALI is a man who should not have a car, judging by how he's allegedly used his red Mitsubishi Eclipse since early May. Two months after he was arrested in a road-rage incident in Center City, Ali, 31, was arrested again Sunday after he allegedly hit a pedestrian who was crossing Market Street near 2nd about 1:20 a.m. and then tried to speed away, said Officer Jillian Russell, a police spokeswoman. Some friends of the injured pedestrian gave chase, and officers on routine patrol spotted them and pulled Ali over, Russell said.
FOOD
June 27, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
As Cristina Martinez heated a wide maguey leaf on the food cart's griddle, her husband, Benjamin Miller, reached into a warming box holding slow-cooked barbacoa lamb, and the earthy aromas of Capulhuac, Mexico, suddenly wafted over this South Philly corner at Eighth and Watkins Streets. "You want rib meat, leg, or spine?" asks Miller, assembling a one-pound package of moist flesh to be gift-wrapped inside the maguey leaf, with a pint of lamb consomme, spicy cactus salad, and a stack of fresh tortillas on the side.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three alumni of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts are finalists in a competition to create artwork for the proposed memorial park in honor of the six people who died in the destruction of the Salvation Army thrift store last year. The sculptors are Elizabeth Jenkins Culp of Radnor; Barb Fox of Strafford; and Geoffrey Dubinsky of Philadelphia. A selection committee for the 22d and Market Memorial Park will pick a winner, possibly by the end of the summer, said David Brigham, president of PAFA.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Washington Square has been one of the quieter corners of Center City since the crowds of pressmen, illustrators, ad salespeople, and buzzing electric paper trucks vanished from the neighborhood, along with Philadelphia's old role as the nation's mass-market publishing center. But the blocks around Washington Square now seem primed to become more like busy Rittenhouse Square , a Philadelphia slice of Manhattan with its pricey apartments, cafes, boutiques, and crowded sidewalks.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
WHEN people get old, accidents and ailments become riskier. A cold can turn to pneumonia. A broken hip can lead to an early demise. It's not pretty, but with proper care the indignities of aging don't have to be lethal. When cities get old, the risks and dangers also increase. Aging pipes and gas mains, crumbling buildings and buckled roads can all take their toll on a city's health - and the safety of its citizens. Ours is certainly not the only old city coping with age, but, as the city marks the year anniversary of one building disaster, it's time to assess how prepared we are. The collapse at 22nd and Market streets was clearly not a simple case of an old building collapsing with age, but a bad mix of a derelict property owner, a demolition crew whose questionable work on the site has led to criminal charges including third-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter, and a city that often operates like an antique machine.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, DANA DiFILIPPO, DAVID GAMBACORTA, RONNIE POLANECZKY & MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writers farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE BUILDING collapse on Market Street shook the city to its core, prompting a host of reforms and investigations. It also ended the lives of six people - and played a role in the death of a seventh - and left their families forever heartbroken. One year later, the Daily News looks back on those lost on that bright June day.   Borbor Davis A Styrofoam heart adorned with plastic flowers is Salvation Army worker Borbor Davis' only tombstone. His widow, Maggie, can't afford a real headstone.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
THE TWO MEN facing a murder trial in last June's Market Street building collapse that killed six people lost another round in court yesterday after a judge rejected their requests to throw out conspiracy charges. Following a brief motions hearing, Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner ruled that city prosecutors had presented enough evidence during a Feb. 18 preliminary hearing to sustain the conspiracy charges. A trial date has not yet been set for Sean Benschop, 43, and Griffin Campbell, 50, who are being held without bail.
NEWS
June 2, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For months, Nancy Winkler and Jay Bryan went out of their way not to pass by 22d and Market Streets. They lived only three blocks away, so it wasn't easy. But avoiding that corner forever would be almost impossible. When the couple did finally find themselves there in April, what they saw only deepened the sadness in their lives - a barren lot, long and narrow, strewn front to back with accumulated garbage. "It was depressing to see that people were trashing it," Bryan said.
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