CollectionsMarket Street
IN THE NEWS

Market Street

BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bank of New York Mellon is reducing its presence in its namesake Market Street building by 80 percent, amid staff cuts and a general trend among office tenants to take up less space. The New York-based bank will vacate in September 184,000 square feet that it uses at the BNY Mellon Center at 1735 Market St., said David Weinberg, chief operating officer of Equity Commonwealth, the building's owner. The bank signed an 11-year renewal prior to March 31 for its remaining 48,000 square feet in the building, Weinberg said in a call Thursday with analysts.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Aubrey Whelan, Matt Gelb, Michaelle Bond, and Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Conehead marching An orange and white striped parking cone sits atop the head of one marcher as the protesters head north on Broad Street, passing the old Philadelphia Inquirer building. The crowd appears to be thinning out. Some people are carrying signs and chanting "United we Stand, Divided We Fall. " To the Parkway Marchers passed the Four Seasons - protected by a line of police officers and their bicycles - and headed onto the Parkway. Earlier, protesters headed down 16th toward Walnut but police steered them back toward Market.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
I was gliding into the left lane of rush-hour Market Street traffic on my Indego bike when I realized just how much fun I was having. I shifted into third gear. I sped past buses. Maybe it was the exhaustion, or the exhaust fumes, but I rang my bell a lot. I was laughing. Four hours earlier, I had not wanted to write this column. It was Thursday and my quad-mates Matt and Aubrey were abuzz about the launch of Philly's new bike-share program, Indego. Philly should have nice things, they said.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
HOW MUCH WOULD you pay for the plastic and paper bags used by grocery stores and other retailers? A penny? Maybe for your thoughts, but City Councilman Mark Squilla thinks you should pay five cents for each bag. A bill he introduced yesterday calls for the tax as a way to discourage littering while helping to fund the city's anti-littering campaign. Two cents from each nickel collected would go to the city and could generate as much as $150,000 a month, said Squilla, a Democrat who represents the 1st District, which includes parts of South Philadelphia, Center City and Port Richmond.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
HASSANATU WULU chose to ogle jewelry rather than to hold Christina Sankey's hand, the way she should have. And when she realized Christina was in trouble, she waited to call police for help. Then she lied about it. And then Christina died. It's that simple. And that devastating. Yesterday, a grand jury recommended that Wulu be charged with reckless endangerment and felony neglect in Christina's death on March 7, 2014. The grand jury's presentment obviously won't bring Christina back to her relatives, who ache with grief for her. But I hope to hell it serves as a warning to the people who are hired to look after the most vulnerable among us: These lives matter.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT WAS EIGHT years ago this month that the Daily News branded 52nd and Market streets one of the city's most dangerous corners. "Death Row" screamed the front-page headline - one part tabloid hyperbole, one part depressing summation of the crime, blight and poverty that had choked the life out of the once-proud business and entertainment strip. Drug deals went down casually in broad daylight. Businesses collapsed, one after another, as a lengthy rebuild of SEPTA's Market-Frankford El turned the streets and sidewalks into a maze of construction equipment and debris.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Maria Panaritis, and Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Before he decided to reinvent the grim Gallery at Market East as a fashion outlet, Joseph Coradino considered converting it into a standard, suburban-style mall. The CEO of the Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust also thought about making it into a giant restaurant-and-entertainment venue, or even a full-price high-fashion mall. But none seemed right for a Market East corridor that had grown decrepit, but now bloomed with new money, construction, and hope. Coradino combined elements of all three to create a vision for the Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia, a $575 million development whose unveiling last week ended years of speculation about the future of the property.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Turns out there's a truck tunnel beneath the Gallery at Market East. It's been there since the structure was built in the 1970s - a huge, hidden space defined by loading docks and trash bins, used as a means to deliver merchandise, food, and supplies when the mall was in its heyday. "It actually is pretty cool," said Brian Abernathy, executive director of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority. "Like a subterranean cavern. " The question of who controls it and who may use it in the future stood among a half-dozen complex matters considered and resolved Thursday, as the authority took the first official step toward placing control of the rundown mall into the hands of a developer who plans a complete remake.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything about the decrepit Gallery at Market East may be about to change. Under an intended top-to-bottom renovation, one of Center City's most notorious dead spots would be reborn as a gleaming glass-and-steel emporium - brimming with brand-name discount fashion shops, destination restaurants, and lively sidewalk caf├ęs. Even the name would be new. Welcome, shoppers, to the Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia. Details of the plan were provided exclusively to The Inquirer in advance of a series of meetings by government agencies whose support is vital to the project.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $19.6 million project to transform a century-old building at the gritty 69th Street terminal complex into a sleek, modern structure that will be greener and more passenger-friendly was officially begun Monday. "This is going to be a model for how we will be able to make old buildings sustainable," said Rep. Patrick Meehan (R., Pa.), one of several politicians at Monday's groundbreaking ceremony. Actual construction work began last fall. Meehan predicted that the upgrades to West Terminal would draw more passengers and bolster the local economy.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|