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Marlboro Man

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1987 | By SUSAN STEWART, Special to the Daily News
You might think that Edward Woodward ("The Equalizer") is a happy man these days. Three months after a heart attack, he is working a civilized 24- hour week on his respected series, he has quit smoking, he is on the road to recovery. He is not, however, happy. It has to do with the smoking part. During a press party in New York a few weeks ago, somebody made the mistake of asking Woodward how he feels. Woodward sighed. "The only way I can answer that is to say not smoking. And that fills my life.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
I don't pretend that I've ever had a smoking problem. I haven't. Sometime, back in my youth, smoking was the in thing. There was no warning by the U.S. surgeon general, no "proof" that cigarettes were harmful to anyone's health. Thousands of movie and televison stars smoked. It was OK; indeed, if you didn't smoke, you felt a bit like a nerd or not part of the in crowd. At the very most, I've smoked six or seven cigarettes in my lifetime. I remember the first one, which may be the reason I never got seriously involved.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | By Nedra Lindsey, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One after the other, the witnesses took the stand. Armed with information they knew would win the case, attorneys bandied about questions, accusations and pronouncements, hoping to stump the defense. On trial: the Marlboro Man, that timeless icon of cool and hip. Philip Morris' longtime poster boy was being tried Wednesday by sixth graders at the Mary E. Volz School for Kick Butts Day. His crime: seducing children into becoming lifelong smokers. "I told him they [Philip Morris]
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | By Lea Sitton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tall and rugged as the Rocky Mountains, he stands like a beacon to motorists heading south on I-95 near Allegheny Avenue. But opponents say the Marlboro Man also stands too close to a school, and looms over the bedroom window of many a Port Richmond child. And that is why the tough guy lost out to a mother from Mayfair. The Marlboro Man, a 60-foot billboard atop the Diamond Furniture building, will be taken down this week, weather permitting, said Howard Weiss, president of Transcor Inc. Weiss leases the billboard to the Philip Morris Co. Another billboard will go up. "Naturally, I'm happy," said Mayfair homemaker Linda Lawrence, who beat the big man at his own game.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
In one fashion ad, which appeared in Gentlemen's Quarterly, a lithe young model stands provocatively, his eyes closed, his arms raised so that his sweater rises just enough to show a hairy stomach; his jogging pants hang off his hips. If that sounds a bit racy, consider Tanline's thong bikini print ad, which ran in men's exercise magazines. The ad includes three men posed so that their muscles ripple; each wears a thong shown from a different, but equally sensual, angle. Or open the current issue of Details magazine and take a look at the pensive male model in the ad for the Cross Colours hip-hop collection.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | TOM GRALISH / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Say goodbye to the Marlboro Man. The cigarette-smoking cowboy, above, disappeared from his spot overlooking the Ben Franklin Bridge, a casualty of the $206 billion settlement between tobacco companies and 46 states that banned all tobacco billboards. By week's end, a beer advertisement, at right, had taken its place.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man" is a goofy name for a movie, by any standard, but it makes a little more sense when you learn that it's a loose remake of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. " What doesn't make sense is why anyone would remake "Butch Cassidy" by replacing Paul Newman and Robert Redford with Mickey Rourke and Don Johnson. It's a strong contrast in style and stature. One tandem comprises two of Hollywood's most enduring male stars, while the other comprises Mickey Rourke and Don Johnson.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
DUTCH POLICE FLAG DOWN 'HASH TAXI' SERVICE Police in Oss, Netherlands, have arrested a "taxi" driver and charged him with taking his customers to the wrong state - the state of altered consciousness. The driver allegedly operated a "hash taxi," the nickname for services that deliver marijuana and hashish to customers' homes. Although the Netherlands has one of the world's most relaxed drug policies, police decided the service went a little too far. Hundreds of "coffee shops" in the country are licensed to sell up to 30 grams of marijuana or hashish, and the law allows people to cultivate small cannabis crops for their personal use. Police said that the delivery service was unlicensed and that the proprietor was growing amounts that exceeded the regulations.
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | By Calvin Trillin
It used to be that when I read about the policy of renting federal land in the West for cattle grazing, the cattle rancher who appeared in my mind was a weathered, raw-boned, independent cuss who looked something like the Marlboro Man and talked - when you could get him to talk, because he was, by nature and upbringing, taciturn - about how a man had to stand on his own two feet, no matter what came down the pike. Then I read that a 100,000-acre chunk of the most beautiful federal land in Idaho is being grazed on cheaply by cattle belonging to computer billionaires William Hewlett and David Packard, two of the richest men in America.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 16 years, the Marlboro Man was West Hollywood's most famous resident. Lasso in hand, wearing chaps, he stood 62 feet tall, high above the Sunset Strip. Tourists posed for pictures with him; he often appeared in movies. Still, when the national tobacco settlement that banned cigarette billboards hustled him out of town last year, many celebrated what they saw as the end of his glorification of a health hazard. The 1998 settlement didn't just ban the Man, it gave California health officials the right to borrow his space.
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SPORTS
June 29, 2012
CHASE UTLEY is a man who protects his emotions as if they are upholstered, his inner self shielded from the general public by an invisible barrier. He does not apologize for this, nor should he. But every now and then, he encounters a force strong enough to flutter that veil upward. In those types of moments, a stoic lays bare his soul. It happened on Wednesday night, just a few minutes after the first pitch, when a sweet, familiar swing flashed through the zone and sent a curveball sailing into the seats in right-centerfield.
NEWS
March 17, 2004 | By Eric Schott
It's about the time of year that everybody gets a little Irish, especially my wife. No sooner does she pull the Valentine hearts off the window than the shamrocks go up. The Christmas CDs have been retired for another season, and now we're entertained by Boys of the Lough, the Chieftains, and the Clancy Brothers. This year, we approach St. Patrick's Day with even more interest, as last October we spent a week in the Emerald Isle - our first visit there. Our daughter was at Galway University studying Irish literature, a most interesting if not marketable discipline, and we decided to take the trip that we had always talked about.
NEWS
September 19, 2001 | By ELMER SMITH
THE CIA calls them "sleepers," these undetected terrorists who live among us and wait, sometimes for years, for their suicide missions. These are men so thoroughly indoctrinated, so perfectly programed that their manipulators can give them large sums of money and dispatch them to our shores without worrying that they will be detected or deterred. By the time they get here, they are springloaded for destruction. Some of these sleepers had families and lived side-by-side with Americans in communities like Delray Beach, Fla., literally living the American dream.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 16 years, the Marlboro Man was West Hollywood's most famous resident. Lasso in hand, wearing chaps, he stood 62 feet tall, high above the Sunset Strip. Tourists posed for pictures with him; he often appeared in movies. Still, when the national tobacco settlement that banned cigarette billboards hustled him out of town last year, many celebrated what they saw as the end of his glorification of a health hazard. The 1998 settlement didn't just ban the Man, it gave California health officials the right to borrow his space.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | By Nedra Lindsey, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One after the other, the witnesses took the stand. Armed with information they knew would win the case, attorneys bandied about questions, accusations and pronouncements, hoping to stump the defense. On trial: the Marlboro Man, that timeless icon of cool and hip. Philip Morris' longtime poster boy was being tried Wednesday by sixth graders at the Mary E. Volz School for Kick Butts Day. His crime: seducing children into becoming lifelong smokers. "I told him they [Philip Morris]
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | TOM GRALISH / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Say goodbye to the Marlboro Man. The cigarette-smoking cowboy, above, disappeared from his spot overlooking the Ben Franklin Bridge, a casualty of the $206 billion settlement between tobacco companies and 46 states that banned all tobacco billboards. By week's end, a beer advertisement, at right, had taken its place.
LIVING
May 10, 1998 | By William Macklin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hey, Linda, how's the old man and the kids? Truth be told, Linda Pentz, 37, a health-care account executive from North Wales, Montgomery County, doesn't have any children and she recently separated from her husband. But as long as Pentz has her Gateway 2000 computer, she'll always feel like one of the clan. Pentz, 37, says she's a proud member of Gateway's self-styled "family," even though she knows that the billion-dollar South Dakota computer corporation's cozy, Middle-American image (played out in everything from shipping cartons speckled with cow spots to customer-service reps who insist on doing "whatever it takes to make you happy")
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | By Malcolm Garcia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's not a Marlboro Man kind of thing, but when guys want to talk guy talk without a beer in one hand and the sports page in the other, there are few places for them to turn. Zen Haurenchuk said that's what he discovered in 1992, when he could not find a men's support group. "I was sick and tired of the bar scene," he recalled recently. "I wanted to connect with men honestly who were dealing with issues I was dealing with. " So Haurenchuk started a group: just himself and one other man. The effort paid off. The group blossomed into a local men's movement that has spawned support groups, weekend retreats and annual gatherings - the third of which is scheduled for Feb. 6 and 7 at the Bryn Athyn Church School on Tomlinson Road.
NEWS
October 21, 1997 | by John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
Another threat to the well-being of the children of America has been happily averted: "Hey Man Cool" chewing gum, the product of a Delaware County company, is changing its image. Elementary school children in the prairies of Minnesota apparently didn't think it was very cool to puff on the cigarette look-alike gum, made more realistic by the fact that puffing on it emitted a cloud of smoke - actually sugar - and the wrapper featured a cowboy resembling the Marlboro man. At least, the adults who run the kids' lives didn't think it was cool.
NEWS
July 5, 1997 | By Robert Weissman
"The Marlboro Man will be riding into the sunset on Joe Camel," said Robert Butterworth, Florida attorney general, at news conference announcing the proposed tobacco settlement. Butterworth got it right, but he left out one crucial element: If Congress accepts the tobacco deal, the Marlboro Man will be riding Joe Camel - to Eastern Europe, Asia and the Third World. Although the terms of the settlement will ban the use of cartoon images to promote smoking in the United States, the restriction will not apply to the tobacco companies' overseas operations.
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