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Marriage Penalty

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NEWS
July 22, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congress yesterday wrapped up work on an election-year tax bonanza for married couples and prepared to send the bill to President Clinton, who has promised to veto it. The Senate voted 60-34 for a bill that ends the so-called marriage penalty paid by 25 million couples each year, following House action on a similar measure this week. Frank R. Lautenberg (D., N.J.) was the only senator from the three-state Philadelphia region to vote against the measure. Savoring success, however short-lived, Republicans said that at a time of burgeoning federal bank accounts, it was high time the government gave some money back to hardworking Americans rather than allow politicians to dream up new ways of spending it. "The issue is whether he will or won't grant America's families the tax relief they deserve," said Sen. William V. Roth Jr. (R., Del.)
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It may sound like the same old fight - Republicans want to cut taxes and Democrats want to spend more money - but congressional insiders say a deal is emerging that could end the so-called marriage penalty in federal income taxes in exchange for a prescription-drug benefit for the elderly. As a result, some married couples would get a significant tax break this election year - an average of $1,400 per couple, and senior citizens for the first time would get federal help to pay soaring prescription costs.
NEWS
April 28, 2004 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Despite the serious ideological differences that divide Democrats from Republicans, especially in an election year, legislators from both parties are uniting behind one of President Bush's tax cuts. This week the House of Representatives is likely to pass a bill that would ensure that at least 27 million married couples retain the tax break granted them by the President's tax-cut legislation in 2001. It would extend relief permanently from the so-called marriage penalty that used to exist in the tax code and forced some couples to pay more in taxes when married than they would have paid if single.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | By Jackie Koszczuk INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The House of Representatives yesterday overwhelmingly approved a boost in the child tax credit as part of a family-friendly tax bill that would cost $400 billion over 10 years. The legislation, which passed, 282-144, would increase the child tax credit from $500 to $600 on income earned this year. That means taxpayers with children would see the extra cash a year from now, when they file forms for 2001. That would amount to nearly $10 billion in immediate tax relief for families with children - a more generous plan than even President Bush proposed because it provides the tax breaks faster.
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seizing on a popular issue with voters, the House took the first step yesterday toward getting rid of a quirk in the tax code that forces 25 million couples to pay higher taxes because they are married. The Republican-controlled House voted 268-158 for a bill that would increase the standard deduction for married couples to twice that of single taxpayers, wiping out a discrepancy that gave singles a bigger individual deduction. The bill faces major obstacles. Although Republicans in Congress and President Clinton agree on the need to eliminate an onerous tax on marriage, they disagree on how to do it. However, both sides are eager to find a way to bridge their differences, lest one or the other be blamed in an election year for stopping a popular piece of legislation.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Senate yesterday voted 61-38 to wipe out the marriage penalty that forces 25 million married couples to pay more federal income taxes than if they were single. It was the second major tax cut approved by the Senate in less than a week and is at the heart of an election-year Republican strategy to pass tax cuts that appeal to large groups of voters at a time of soaring federal surpluses. "We believe it is un-American to make people choose between love and money," Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R., Texas)
NEWS
May 27, 2003
SEN. RICK SANTORUM apparently is pro-marriage when it provides a chance to bash gays, but not when it means giving lower-income workers a break. The big budget tax cut that was worked out in Congress last week includes a speed up of relief from the so-called "marriage penalty" - except for low income workers who get the Earned Income Tax Credit. The marriage penalty is the part of the tax code that socks married couples with higher tax bills than they paid as two single people.
NEWS
January 13, 2000 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Republican congressional candidate Melissa Brown accused Democratic U.S. Rep. Joseph M. Hoeffel 3d yesterday of backing off promises to fight to reduce the federal income-tax "marriage penalty" and the gift and estate tax. "This is perhaps one of the most glaring examples of where Joe Hoeffel has let down the voters of Montgomery County," Brown said. "Joe Hoeffel has failed to introduce or support any bill, including several Democratic proposals, that would eliminate these taxes.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Some call it the Marriage Penalty; others call it the Sin Subsidy. It's a provision of the federal tax code that imposes higher taxes on a two-income married couple than on a similar pair of singles. Critics say it encourages couples to live in sin rather than get married. For example: He earns $20,000 and pays $2,093 in taxes; she earns and pays the same. They marry and find that together they now owe Uncle Sam $4,365 a year, an increase of $179. Many happy returns? A bill to erase the marriage penalty was recently introduced in Congress.
NEWS
May 16, 2003 | Daily News wire services
The Senate yesterday approved a scaled-down $350 billion tax cut package that makes President Bush's proposal to eliminate dividend taxes temporary. The Senate approved the bill in a 51-49 vote. The bill eliminates taxes on all dividends in two steps. In 2003, 50 percent of dividend earnings would be tax free, and then 100 percent in 2004 through 2006. The cut would expire in 2007. The Senate's measure also would increase the child tax credit from $600 to $1,000, gradually eliminate the marriage penalty and allow small businesses to write off $100,000 in new equipment purchases.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
As the Affordable Care Act wobbles into its second month, more people are enrolling on the Healthcare.gov website and learning if they are eligible to get a subsidy and what their monthly premium payment could be. Not everyone is happy, especially those who happen to be just above the subsidy cutoff. Some single older adults who don't qualify for a subsidy - the cutoff is $45,980 for one person - are pulling out dictionaries (it's a book older people use) and rereading the definition of affordable . In Southeastern Pennsylvania a silver-tier plan, which covers 70 percent of insurance costs, can carry a monthly premium of $575 to $1,012, depending on the plan.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
Life changes can bring celebrations and condolences, and they often bring tax changes, too. Pay attention to those, or risk ending up with headaches or extra costs. For example, a new job means a W-4 form. Fill it out carefully, lest you have too much or too little withheld. If you have substantial other income, such as interest and dividends, adjust withholding accordingly. If you're paying off a mortgage or student loans, or otherwise can itemize deductions, adjust withholding allowances upward to reflect lower tax liability.
NEWS
October 27, 2004 | By Grover G. Norquist
If you'd like to pay more of your hard-earned income to the federal government, then vote for John Kerry on Tuesday. If he's elected, he will raise your taxes. Kerry has taken a page directly out of Bill Clinton's tax-increase handbook. In 1992, Clinton campaigned on cutting middle-class taxes while promising only to raise taxes on people making more than $200,000. This is the exact platform on which Kerry is now running. Once Clinton was elected, however, no middle-class tax cut ever happened.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Kristen Kirk Mayock
In light of the pain and difficulty inherent in post-9/11 America, our country, quite properly, is uninterested in reliving the last four years, let alone the last 40 years. What we are interested in is where we are headed as a nation. On Thursday night, President Bush gave us just that. The President's speech presented a striking contrast to Sen. John Kerry's earlier profusion of vagaries and triteness. The President presented his clear and strong vision for America's next four years.
NEWS
April 28, 2004 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Despite the serious ideological differences that divide Democrats from Republicans, especially in an election year, legislators from both parties are uniting behind one of President Bush's tax cuts. This week the House of Representatives is likely to pass a bill that would ensure that at least 27 million married couples retain the tax break granted them by the President's tax-cut legislation in 2001. It would extend relief permanently from the so-called marriage penalty that used to exist in the tax code and forced some couples to pay more in taxes when married than they would have paid if single.
NEWS
March 29, 2004 | By FLAVIA COLGAN
WE HEAR a lot about the "marriage penalty. " But what about the "gay penalty"? Yes, the 1,400 benefits that same-sex couples don't have. The ones that help streamline the household economies of every heterosexual married couple in the nation. Every word that is said about gay marriage insults or offends someone, on one side of the fence or the other. Social and cultural conservatives believe their sense of morality is under attack. Gays and liberals believe they are simply defending - and demanding - basic human rights.
NEWS
January 16, 2004
OH, COUNSEL THIS: With millions of children lacking adequate nutrition, health care, or education, the Bush administration is planning to shell out $1.5 billion to promote "healthy marriages" through counseling programs and advertising campaigns. They want to use government money to put up billboards advertising how great marriage is and, according to the New York Times, "teach problem-solving, negotiation and listening skills" to help couples avoid divorce. Bush has dusted off marriage promotion just in time for possible inclusion in the State of the Union address next week.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | By Froma Harrop
They pay higher taxes than other Americans with the same incomes and deductions. They get charged more for car insurance than people with identical driving records. They contribute the same amount to Social Security but receive lower benefits. On the job, they do equal work for unequal compensation. And they are half of America's adults. Who is this army of the dispossessed? Single people! So it is with some sourness that many single Americans watch gay-advocacy groups hail Canada's decision to allow same-sex marriages and urge the same here.
NEWS
May 27, 2003
SEN. RICK SANTORUM apparently is pro-marriage when it provides a chance to bash gays, but not when it means giving lower-income workers a break. The big budget tax cut that was worked out in Congress last week includes a speed up of relief from the so-called "marriage penalty" - except for low income workers who get the Earned Income Tax Credit. The marriage penalty is the part of the tax code that socks married couples with higher tax bills than they paid as two single people.
NEWS
May 16, 2003 | Daily News wire services
The Senate yesterday approved a scaled-down $350 billion tax cut package that makes President Bush's proposal to eliminate dividend taxes temporary. The Senate approved the bill in a 51-49 vote. The bill eliminates taxes on all dividends in two steps. In 2003, 50 percent of dividend earnings would be tax free, and then 100 percent in 2004 through 2006. The cut would expire in 2007. The Senate's measure also would increase the child tax credit from $600 to $1,000, gradually eliminate the marriage penalty and allow small businesses to write off $100,000 in new equipment purchases.
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