CollectionsMarrow
IN THE NEWS

Marrow

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
March 28, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
New York Mets bench coach Don Baylor has the same type of bone-marrow cancer that New York Yankees pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre was diagnosed with three years ago. After a spring-training physical examination last month, a bone-marrow test in New York on March 12 revealed that Baylor had multiple myeloma, the Mets said. Baylor, 53, will receive four consecutive days of oral and intravenous chemotherapy during the Mets' first regular-season homestand, which begins March 31 against the Chicago Cubs.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | By Karen McAllister, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Upper Merion Township will host testing for a bone-marrow-donor program March 13 as part of a national effort to increase the donor pool. The Fanconi Anemia Research Foundation, a co-sponsor of the event, is trying to boost the list of possible donors across the country this year by 200,000, to raise the total to one million, said foundation president Michael Greenberg. Greenberg showed a video to the township supervisors last Thursday detailing the process the donor and recipient must go through.
SPORTS
June 16, 2011 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
As Andy Talley says, other schools have their Matt Szczurs. In November 2009, Rowan defensive end Matt Hoffman donated his marrow. In April, it was Rhode Island offensive lineman Matt Greenhalgh's turn. Ditto Ursinus running back Teddy Conrad. A month later, Penn added two more to the expanding list: tight end Robert Gawlas and defensive back J.P. Grant. Soon, so will West Chester, thanks to linebacker Jared Bonacquisti and offensive lineman Dom Dovidio. Lehigh linebacker Mike Groome is also about to give the gift.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | Choose one .
Good Morning America cohost Robin Roberts , who five years ago battled breast cancer, on Monday teared up on the show as she revealed that she has the rare blood and marrow disorder myelodysplastic syndrome. Roberts, 51, said she had begun chemotherapy and will need to get a bone-marrow transplant this fall. She has a perfect match: her sister Sally Ann Roberts , a TV anchor in New Orleans. "My doctors tell me I'm going to beat this, and I know it's true," said Roberts, who developed MDS as a result of her cancer treatments, an extremely rare form of transmission.
SPORTS
February 3, 2012 | By Rick O, Inquirer Columnist
Taking a page from Mark Twain and showing that his sense of humor is very much intact, Jim Fenerty, waiting Thursday afternoon for doctors to release him from Abington Memorial Hospital, said, "The reports of my demise have been greatly exaggerated. " Fenerty, athletic director and boys' basketball coach at Germantown Academy, fell ill Tuesday morning while teaching a senior-level course on civil liberties. One of his students is his daughter, Erin. "My right hand went numb, then part of my face did the same," he said.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
John Bucci Jr. has gone home cancer free, and he plans to cook a steak. Bucci, the owner and griddle master of John's Roast Pork in Philadelphia, was released from Jeanes Hospital on Monday evening after a successful bone-marrow transplant to cure his pre-leukemia. "John has had an unusually benign course for a healthy donor-transplant recipient so far," said his doctor, Thomas Klumpp, assistant director of the Fox Chase Temple Bone Marrow Transplant Program. In an e-mailed note, Klumpp emphasized "so far," because even a successful bone-marrow transplant from a donor carries significant long-term risks, including sometimes fatal graft-versus-host disease, or a relapse of cancer.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two months ago, she didn't know whether she would even get the bone-marrow transplant doctors said could cure her of leukemia. Yesterday afternoon, Dot Wohler came home from the hospital - just four weeks after doctors wheeled her weakened body into the transplant unit at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia and dripped pints of her brother's marrow into her body. Just one month after she checked in and started a weeklong regimen of chemotherapy that destroyed her bone marrow, the blood-like liquid that produces white blood cells, platelets and hemoglobin.
SPORTS
April 20, 1995 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
The football season doesn't start for five months, but Villanova coach Andy Talley already is looking for blood. For the fourth time in three years, Talley is spearheading an on-campus blood drive for the national bone-marrow donor program. His efforts have added more than 2,000 names to the computer files, which are monitored by the Human Leukocyte Antigen Registry Foundation. Sunday, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., the football program, in conjunction with the university's Alumni Assocation, will hold another testing at Jake Nevin Fieldhouse.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Pittsburgh hospital yesterday became the first in the world to offer new parents the chance to buy a controversial form of "biological insurance" for their baby. For $1,500, parents who deliver at Magee-Womens Hospital now can have the blood from their newborn's umbilical cord and placenta frozen for at least a decade and possibly much longer. In the future, the blood, which is rich in blood-forming "stem" cells, may be used in the same child or in a sibling for gene therapy or to replenish blood ravaged by chemotherapy or radiation.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
IT'S ALL RELATIVE Was Einstein right? It's been 75 years since Albert Einstein formulated his theory of general relativity and scientists are still asking that question. The answer is yes - for now, says a Washington University physicist. "Although it is remarkable that this theory, born 75 years ago out of almost pure thought, has managed to survive every test, the possibility of suddenly finding a discrepancy will continue to drive experiments for years to come," Clifford M. Will reports in Science magazine.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 15, 2016 | Mike Kern, STAFF WRITER
THIS STORY didn't have to have a happy ending. The fact is, many of them don't. Maybe that's why the long-awaited hug that took place on Friday night between 68-year-old Judy Cooper and former Ursinus running back Ted Conrad, who's 43 years younger, was . . . "Right up there," Cooper smiled. "And I've had some good ones. " It felt so right, they held onto each other not once but twice, as if neither wanted to let go. "I knew it was going to be emotional," said Conrad.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Fox Chase Cancer Center has agreed to establish a bone-marrow transplant program with Universal Hospital in the United Arab Emirates, the two groups said Thursday. The new program will aim to provide care locally and regionally and include physician exchange programs, they said. Fox Chase, part of Temple University Health System, last week started seeing patients at a new outptient center for bone-marrow transplant patients at Jeanes Hospital. hbrubaker@phillynews.com 215-854-4651 @InqBrubaker
BUSINESS
February 11, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When Temple University Health System bought Fox Chase Cancer Center in 2012, one goal was to balance Temple's role in North Philadelphia as the de facto public hospital for the poor with better-insured cancer patients. But first, Temple had to get Fox Chase's financial house in order. Temple appears to be well on its way to that goal, reporting that Fox Chase had an operating profit of $11.34 million last year after several money-losing years in a row. Thursday will mark another step in the rejuvenation of Fox Chase, with the official opening of an outpatient clinic for the Fox Chase-Temple University Hospital Bone Marrow Transplant Program on the fifth floor of Temple's Jeanes Hospital, right next door.
SPORTS
December 18, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Staff Writer
FOR THE third time since September, a Villanova football player has donated his bone marrow to try to save someone's life. First it was junior offensive lineman Jake Prus, who was followed a few weeks later by senior wide receiver Jacob Gribb. Now senior cornerback C.J. Logan has joined them. This week he underwent a surgical procedure, and the marrow was then transported to the patient's location for transplant. Logan became part of the registry of potential donors during the annual drive that coach Andy Talley holds each spring and was identified as a close match earlier this fall.
SPORTS
October 1, 2015 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Columnist
FOR THE second time in two weeks, a Villanova football player is donating his bone marrow in hopes of saving someone's life, as part of coach Andy Talley's "Be The Match" foundation. Senior reserve wide receiver Jacob Gribb, who's played in all four games for the 14th-ranked team in FCS, will go through the procedure today at an undisclosed area hospital. The patient is a man in his early 30s who has leukemia. Earlier this month, junior offensive lineman Jake Prus missed two games for the same reason.
SPORTS
September 3, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
One might think that Villanova right tackle Jake Prus views protecting Walter Payton Award-winning quarterback John Robertson as his primary job this fall. Not quite. While the 6-foot-4, 300-pound senior from Woodstown in Salem County takes football seriously, he's even more focused on his fellow man. So on Sept. 10, Prus will spend eight hours at Hahnemann Hospital donating bone marrow to help save the life of a 65-year-old man he has never met. "It's cool being able to save someone's life by doing so little on my part, you know what I mean?"
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
So many cities. So many miles. So many lives to save. SAM (Sharing America's Marrow), a collaboration of two sisters and a friend, is on a nationwide mission to sign up bone-marrow donors. It is a journey both personal and profound. Five years ago, Sam Kimura, now 22, of Louisville, Ky., was diagnosed with a rare blood disease, aplastic anemia. She needed a bone-marrow transplant for a cure but couldn't find a match, not even with her sister and best friend, Alex Kimura, 24. Alex described the day she learned she couldn't help Sam as "the worst day of my life.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
STATWISE, IT was the greatest day Adam DiMichele ever had. The former Temple quarterback, now the Owls' wide receivers coach, helped sign up 225 people for the "Be the Match" bone marrow registry yesterday. The program, operated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP), helps find matches for those in need. According to the NMDP website, a person is diagnosed with a blood cancer every 4 minutes. And, every 10 minutes, someone dies from a blood cancer. Each year, thousands with blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma are cured.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Eileen Ng, Associated Press
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Two HIV-positive patients in the United States who had bone marrow transplants for cancer have stopped antiretroviral therapy and still show no detectable sign of the AIDS virus, researchers said Wednesday. The Harvard University researchers stressed it was too early to say the men had been cured but said it was an encouraging sign that the virus had not rebounded in their blood months after drug treatment ended. The first person reported to be cured of HIV, American Timothy Ray Brown, underwent a stem-cell transplant in 2007 to treat his leukemia.
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I pulled into the muddy lot between the train tracks and the old sandwich shack, and John Bucci Jr. was waiting. It was after hours at John's Roast Pork in South Philadelphia, but his clean white apron was pulled taut around his waist. And as the garlicky smell of roasting picnic hams rubbed in rosemary wafted from the luncheonette to greet me, Bucci pumped his fists skyward and broke into a victory dance. "You're back!" he said. But the shocker here was that John Bucci Jr. was back - and glowing healthy against tall odds.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|