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Marshall Plan

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July 1, 1994 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
John Marshall set goals. He had dreams. He wanted to be a Division I track and field head coach at the "top level. " And now, that's precisely where the 30-year-old former Olympian is starting out. Yesterday, Marshall was named the new coach at Villanova. He'll take over both the men's and women's programs for the highly-successful Marty Stern, who officially retires Aug. 1. For the last two years, Marshall was Stern's No. 1 assistant. "The best place to start is at the top," said Marshall, who ran middle distance for the Wildcats from 1981 to 1985.
NEWS
June 25, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
O'Neill Osborn, 88, of Haverford, a retired pharmaceutical executive who was an administrator with the Marshall Plan after World War II, died of pancreatic cancer June 16 at home. A native of Oxnard, Calif., Mr. Osborn earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. During World War II, he served in the Navy and was a navigator for patrol squadrons in the South Pacific and the Philippines. He received two Air Medals. After his discharge, Mr. Osborn worked with an import- export company doing business with China until the communist takeover in 1949.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | By TRUDY RUBIN
Strobe Talbott, the administration's top Russia expert, says America has a huge stake in the ongoing struggle over Russian reforms and can still affect the outcome. But there was something surreal about Talbott's testimony to Congress last week on aid to Russia. His remarks seemed amazingly out of touch with what is going on in Russia today and with what I saw there in a recent visit. Talbott said that more Western help will be forthcoming only in the wake of speedier Russian reforms, not before.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By David S. Broder
The 50th anniversary of the speech that launched the Marshall Plan does not come until June 5, but President Clinton decided to start the celebration while he is in Europe this week. No matter. This is one occasion where there cannot be wretched excess. The effort to rebuild Western Europe that began with Secretary of State George C. Marshall's speech at Harvard on June 5, 1947, was one of the great achievements of statesmanship of this - or any - century. It has gone into history under Marshall's name because that is the way President Harry S. Truman wanted it. Truman had unbounded admiration for the man who as Army chief of staff had organized the forces that Dwight Eisenhower and Douglas MacArthur led to victory.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | By RICHARD REEVES
"Our policy is directed . . . against hunger, poverty, desperation and chaos. Its purpose should be the revival of a working economy so as to permit the emergence of political and social conditions in which free institutions can exist. " Those words are not from President Clinton in Vancouver. That was a line from Secretary of State George Marshall's commencement speech at Harvard in 1947, the public beginning of the European Recovery Act. The Marshall Plan, as it is usually called, provided $15.2 billion in U.S. aid over four years to spur the economic rebirth of old allies and enemies devastated during World War II. It was a wonderful and generous initiative in almost every way, even if Marxist and revisionist historians have seen it as a subtle American plot to gain control over the postwar world economy.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
Terrel H. Bell, former U.S. secretary of education, has called for a "Marshall plan" to revive the nation's public colleges and universities. The plan comes out of a study titled, "To Secure the Blessings of Liberty. " It is the work of a 22-member commission appointed by the board of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, which represents 372 four-year institutions. Bell addressed the AASCU convention concerning the report in Phoenix on Monday. The report arrives with a certain irony.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | By ARNOLD A. OFFNER
The Cold War is over, and the world now must boldly fashion a modern Marshall Plan of economic and technical aid to help bring the former Soviet Union into the global mainstream. Now Germany is united and strong, while the Soviet Union has disintegrated. To establish a new European equilibrium, however, requires a strong Russian- led state. Thus, just as the Marshall Plan followed the last great global conflict, now is the time to formulate a new, multilaterally funded program to help the Russian - and other - people recover from their post-Cold War devastation.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Chris Mondics of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Saluting the American "hand up" that helped a devastated Europe rebound from World War II, President Clinton promised yesterday to "complete the noble journey" begun half a century ago by ensuring that Eastern Europe remain free and democratic. "Today, I affirm to the people of Europe, as Gen. Marshall did 50 years ago: America stands with you," Clinton said on a day dedicated to the 50th anniversary of Secretary of State George C. Marshall's plan to rebuild Europe. "We have learned the lessons of history.
NEWS
November 16, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stef Wertheimer, a Palmach-era Zionist and one of Israel's richest men, has a simple plan to end the Palestinian-Israeli conflict: Bring good jobs to the Arab world with an economic infusion modeled on the Marshall Plan that rebuilt Europe after World War II. Invest in industry and infrastructure, he tirelessly tells leaders in Israel and abroad, and prosperity can bring peace. Don't wait for quiet; bring it on with industrial development. To that end, Wertheimer, 77, is promoting a plan to build as many as 100 industrial parks across the region, including a billion-dollar demonstration project in Aqaba, Jordan, and a park in Rafah, the impoverished southern tip of the Gaza Strip.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | By MATTHEW MILLER
Yesterday was the 50th anniversary of the unveiling of the Marshall Plan, a certifiable moment of American greatness - and one that stares at us across the decades in silent reproach. How can it be that half a century ago, when America was a third as rich, we spent 10 times more as a percentage of our income to help struggling foreigners than we do today? The question goes beyond the matter of foreign aid to something deeper in our national character. Why can't we seem to think big anymore?
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NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Do conservatives still believe in American greatness? The question is not intended to discourage the healthy debate being pushed by Rand Paul and his allies over whether Republicans in the George W. Bush years were too eager to deploy our country's armed forces overseas. After the steep costs of the Iraq war, it is a very necessary discussion. But the libertarian senator from Kentucky has inadvertently called our attention to a deep contradiction within American conservatism. Those who share Paul's philosophy are quite right to see the rise of American power as closely linked to the rise of the New Deal-Great Society state at home.
NEWS
August 8, 2012
By Nicolaus Mills Many commentators have contrasted the England of 1948, which staged the Olympics on a shoestring while recovering from war, with the England of today, which is staging the Olympics with a lavish budget while coping with recession. The comparison makes Clement Attlee's postwar Labor Party seem much more attuned to economic reality than David Cameron's contemporary Conservatives. But another contrast that should interest us is the one between the America of 1948 and the America of today.
NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
An unsolicited memo to Barack Obama: Mr. President, can you speak Truman? If you want to stay in office beyond 2012, you need to channel his language. Enough, already, with all your overtures to the Republicans. Why bother trying to extend your hand to people whose primal impulse is to devour it? You surely remember what happened the other day. You suggested extending the payroll tax cut in order to boost consumer spending, and key House Republicans naturally said no. They won't even cooperate with you on a tax cut. That alone proves there's no point in talking to them anymore.
NEWS
June 25, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
O'Neill Osborn, 88, of Haverford, a retired pharmaceutical executive who was an administrator with the Marshall Plan after World War II, died of pancreatic cancer June 16 at home. A native of Oxnard, Calif., Mr. Osborn earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. During World War II, he served in the Navy and was a navigator for patrol squadrons in the South Pacific and the Philippines. He received two Air Medals. After his discharge, Mr. Osborn worked with an import- export company doing business with China until the communist takeover in 1949.
NEWS
June 23, 2006 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
WHEN MICHAEL Berg found out that the man who'd beheaded his son Nick had been killed by U.S. forces, he didn't give thanks. Far from it. The grieving father and congressional candidate stated that the loss of any life was tragic, or words to that effect. The clear implication was that Nick Berg's execution was no different from a military maneuver that had neutralized a terrorist mastermind. When three men committed suicide at Guantanamo, human-rights advocates and miscellaneous administration critics decried the harsh conditions that allegedly forced them to take their own lives.
NEWS
March 20, 2006 | By Donald H. Rumsfeld
I recently spoke at the library and birthplace of President Harry S. Truman to reflect on his leadership in the early days of the Cold War and to consider what lessons might apply to another - and in many ways very different - struggle that could occupy our country for a good many years ahead. With the perspective of history, the many new institutions and programs of the Truman years - such as the doctrine of containment, the Marshall Plan, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Defense, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization - can seem as part of a broadly supported strategy that led to what now almost seems like an inevitable victory in the Cold War. But, of course, things didn't unfold that way. Our country was tired after the Second World War, and strong strains of isolationism still persisted.
NEWS
February 21, 2005
On this day, we celebrate our presidents. And so we should. This is a hard job, famous for whitening men's hair before their time, famous for isolating men, balking their greatest hopes. As William Howard Taft once said, the White House can be "the loneliest place in the world. " Among our presidents we can number some true greats. George Washington stood steady as the nation found its footing in the Constitution. Abraham Lincoln - consistently identified by historians as the greatest ever - held the country together through civil war and signed the Emancipation Proclamation.
NEWS
October 8, 2004 | By GLENN D. PORTER
THE POPULAR thinking was he didn't deserve the job. He wasn't qualified to be president. He wasn't popularly elected. Critics said he was stupid. He spoke with a regional accent. He was a failure in business. He only served in the National Guard. He surrounded himself with cronies and insiders. The press hated him. He is going to lose the election they said. The polls were close. He supported an unpopular war. He challenged labor leaders. He got the job because of his connections.
NEWS
November 16, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stef Wertheimer, a Palmach-era Zionist and one of Israel's richest men, has a simple plan to end the Palestinian-Israeli conflict: Bring good jobs to the Arab world with an economic infusion modeled on the Marshall Plan that rebuilt Europe after World War II. Invest in industry and infrastructure, he tirelessly tells leaders in Israel and abroad, and prosperity can bring peace. Don't wait for quiet; bring it on with industrial development. To that end, Wertheimer, 77, is promoting a plan to build as many as 100 industrial parks across the region, including a billion-dollar demonstration project in Aqaba, Jordan, and a park in Rafah, the impoverished southern tip of the Gaza Strip.
NEWS
October 10, 2003 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Austria revives memories with a coin honoring the Marshall Plan. The last of an eight-coin series, "Austria Through the Ages," the 20-euro silver piece marks postwar Austria's emergence from four-power governance from 1945 to 1955. The coin shows soldiers from the four nations riding in a jeep. Banners depicting agriculture and reconstruction hang below the letters ERP (for European Recovery Program) and "Marshall-Plan. " Austria's eagle is on the reverse, along with the 2003 date.
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