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Martha Stewart

NEWS
July 4, 2002 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday, Martha Stewart canceled her morning network television appearance, postponed her October visit to Philadelphia to accept an award from the Moore College of Art and Design, and saw her autobiography put on hold. With prosecutors nipping at her garden boots, Stewart was supposed to show off her icebox desserts on CBS's The Early Show, but was a no-show instead. "CBS is a premier news network and, as such, they are compelled to interview Martha Stewart regarding the ImClone matter," said her spokeswoman, Susan Magrino.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | By CATHERINE LUCEY luceyc@phillynews.com The Associated Press and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Martha Stewart's next book may be called: "How to Hold A Fabulous Party in your Cell Block. "Martha Stewart's next book may be called: "How to Hold A Fabulous Party in your Cell Block. " According to the New York Daily News' Rush and Molloy, Stewart hosted a small New Year's Eve soiree in her cell. She even danced. "I tell you, Martha was getting into it," eyewitness Jose Figueroa tells People. "Martha's got a little funk in her; she was jamming and clapping. " Martha has reportedly also befriended fellow inmates and has adopted the prison cat as a pet. And (as if the above wasn't nauseating enough)
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martha Stewart, clearly superior A Martha Stewart-Rachael Ray mud wrestle? Yes, please! Martha started it, oh, she did. Last night on ABC's Nightline, she smacked Rachael's skillet skills. She told host Cynthia McFadden that the pert, feisty, spunky, perky Rachael shtick's "not good enough for me. . . . She's more of an entertainer . . . with her bubbly personality, than she is a teacher, like me. " Downtrodden Rachael kept her composure while (we're sure) grinding her molars to powder.
FOOD
July 12, 1995 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
Her name is Barbara, and she really does have a recipe for Chitterlings in Puff Pastry in her new cookbook, "B. Smith's Entertaining and Cooking for Friends" (Artisan/$30). "Chitterlings don't often turn up these days," Smith - a former model who owns the B. Smith restaurants in New York and Washington, D.C. - writes in a preface to the recipe on Page 101. "To prevent their falling by the wayside, I created this unusual hors d'oeuvre for special occasions with friends who are familiar with and appreciate this delicacy.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
Martha knew better Robert W. Tracinski misses the point regarding Martha Stewart (Jan. 13, "Martha-hatred is simply envy"). After more than 40 years of managing money, I reflect on the first thing I learned: You do not trade on inside information. I may not have agreed with the law, but I was bound to abide by it. Martha was a broker before she was the maven of living. History is replete with words of those who thought they were above the law: You won't have me to kick around anymore.
LIVING
March 31, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the chance to gawk at Martha in her Westport, Conn., garden - a place where the weeds are cute and the dirt so clean she fluffs it through her fingers and none of it sticks - $24.98 seems a small price to pay. Martha insists she gets pretty gross after a day of digging, but you'd never know it from the manicure. Or the poufy blond bangs and the jumbo diamond studs. Even her jeans are pressed. This is Martha Stewart, after all. And her new two-disc DVD set, Martha's Spring Gardening (Warner Home Video)
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | By Judy Harch
Shabby chic. I just don't get it. Why would you take a brand-new piece of furniture or pottery and turn it into something you would ordinarily walk past at a garage sale? This latest rage in home decor must be part of the generation gap. I was born just as World War II was winding down and the American postwar economy was heating up. Returning servicemen and women were staking out their chunk of the American dream. Upward mobility was in. Many young newlyweds had a house full of shabby hand-me-down furniture that they would have labeled anything but chic.
NEWS
November 1, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martha Stewart and Donald Trump, whose egos will someday be enshrined in the Lincoln Memorial - is it big enough? - have been exchanging verbal salvos. That's either because they're bored or are looking to create hype for their highly respected but decidedly flagging reality-TV shows. Speaking to Fortune mag, the domestic diva turned stay-at-home convict turned despotic-reality-TV-goddess says she thought her NBC show, The Apprentice: Martha Stewart would replace The Donald's original Apprentice.
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before she even put down her bag or said hello, Libbie Summers was compelled to comment on the bright, minimal vibe at the La Colombe near City Hall. It's just her way: For the cookbook author, culinary producer, blogger, and food stylist, aesthetics are tied into everything she does. "On the train I was writing notes about radishes and white lace and spring onions," she says. "I can't help it, my head goes crazy!" The Savannah, Ga., resident was in town for a few days this month, promoting the recent release of The Whole Hog Cookbook , her first solo title.
NEWS
December 4, 2005 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although many actors say they'd love to direct, few have done so and excelled at it like Clint Eastwood. As a result, he'll be receiving the highest honor that can be bestowed by the Directors Guild of America, the Lifetime Achievement Award, the Associated Press reports. "As one of the most prolific, versatile directors in the history of the medium, there isn't a genre that Clint Eastwood hasn't mastered in the more than 25 films he has directed over the past 35 years," said Michael Apted, guild president.
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