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NEWS
March 20, 2005 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During the American Revolution, George Washington's wife, Martha, spent the warm months of the year, while her husband was with the army, overseeing activities at their estate, Mount Vernon. But when the army went into winter quarters, Martha joined her husband. Thus it was that Martha Washington arrived at Valley Forge in February 1778 to join George. At the time, the soldiers had suffered from shortages of food, medicine and poor shelter. "The army was on the point of dissolution," according to historian Benson Bobrick, writing in Angel in the Whirlwind: The Triumph of the American Revolution.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one gray box is a 1778 letter written by George Washington at Valley Forge. The flowing cursive wasn't particularly eloquent, but showed the minutia he tackled during the Revolution. Washington asked the New York governor for help tracking down an American officer who had confiscated a money box from the British at Princeton, then apparently converted it "to his own use. " In another box is a 1865 letter written by Abraham Lincoln to a woman who asked the president to send her a portion of his second inaugural address - in his own hand.
NEWS
July 1, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
To George and Martha Washington, her owners, she was "the girl. " To the framers of the Constitution, who she was didn't matter - she was three-fifths of a person, a chattel slave. Oney Judge was only about 16 when she came to Philadelphia, the nation's temporary capital, in 1790. A few years later, she learned she was about to be given away by the Washingtons as a wedding gift. She gathered herself up and refused, defying the president, the Constitution, and all the powerful forces arrayed against her. She escaped.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | BY HALEY KMETZ, kmetzh@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
PASSED DOWN by descendants of the nation's first first lady, a 5-by-9-inch swatch of silk brocade from one of Martha Washington's dresses ended up with family friend Alden Freeman. In 1932, he gave it as a gift to Nan Britton, a woman involved in the first publicized presidential sex scandal. And now you can claim the fabric as your own. Yesterday, it was offered for sale for $40,000 by the Philly-based Raab Collection, which has it in a vault. It may be the only Martha Washington dress snippet ever put on the market.
NEWS
February 26, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Oney Judge died 160 years ago yesterday, 52 years after she cast off her bonds, 52 years after fleeing Philadelphia to escape the man and woman who owned her and who wanted to give her away as a wedding bauble - George and Martha Washington. Oney Judge was about 75 when she died in New Hampshire on Feb. 25, 1848. Her husband was dead. Her three children were dead. But she died a free woman - if still legally a fugitive - one who had defied the first president of the United States.
NEWS
September 5, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Germantown house where George Washington rode out Philadelphia's 1793 yellow fever epidemic and summered the following year will be closed for at least a year for upgrades, renovations and installation of new exhibitions, the National Park Service has announced. The Deshler-Morris House will close sometime after the first week in October, said Jane Cowley, spokeswoman for Independence National Historical Park, which owns and operates the house. Deshler-Morris and an adjoining building are slated to receive new heating and cooling systems and other systems improvements, Cowley said.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve years ago, when Nancy Loane visited Washington's headquarters at Valley Forge National Historical Park, she asked the ranger a facetious question: "Did Martha Washington sleep here?" Loane assumed she knew the answer. So she was surprised when the ranger informed her that Martha not only had slept in the stone house that her husband occupied during the winter of 1777-78 but also had spent four months there. The ranger's reply launched Loane on an odyssey of research and discovery and spawned a passion bordering on obsession.
NEWS
July 4, 2008
Across Independence Mall on this Fourth of July, storytellers will entertain Philadelphia visitors with tales of the American colonists' struggle for independence. Literally beneath their feet, though, an equally stirring story of another people's quest for freedom waits to be told to a much wider audience. It's a disquieting narrative about how the first president quartered nine slaves in the nation's first White House, a mansion at Sixth and Market Streets in the city where the Declaration of Independence was signed.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
About 50 people gathered under the hot sun at Independence Mall on Friday to remember and acknowledge an unusual event - the successful escape of an enslaved African woman from the household of the first president of the United States. "Today, we are here to celebrate the brave and daring escape of Oney Judge," attorney Michael Coard said through a bullhorn while supporters and onlookers gathered near the corner of Sixth and Market Streets. "It's important that the story of our enslaved ancestors be told.
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NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
An array of politicians, benefactors, and nonprofit leaders gathered Thursday morning beneath a vast party tent beside a very deep hole along South Third Street to celebrate the symbolic groundbreaking of the Museum of the American Revolution. When the deep hole is filled and the $119 million building opens in two years, it will be, officials believe, the nation's first museum to tell the whole story of the American Revolution - from the disgruntled grumbling over British taxes in the 1760s through the desperate days of the Continental Army in the 1770s and on to eventual independence in the 1780s.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one gray box is a 1778 letter written by George Washington at Valley Forge. The flowing cursive wasn't particularly eloquent, but showed the minutia he tackled during the Revolution. Washington asked the New York governor for help tracking down an American officer who had confiscated a money box from the British at Princeton, then apparently converted it "to his own use. " In another box is a 1865 letter written by Abraham Lincoln to a woman who asked the president to send her a portion of his second inaugural address - in his own hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington , Philadelphia actor-playwright James Ijames has crafted a superbly written, emotionally compelling, and morally challenging play. How challenging? About halfway through his 80-minute one-act, I no longer wanted to review it. The play begins at the bedside of Martha Washington (Nancy Boykin) some years after George Washington's death. His will provided that their mutually held slaves be emancipated once she died.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | BY HALEY KMETZ, kmetzh@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
PASSED DOWN by descendants of the nation's first first lady, a 5-by-9-inch swatch of silk brocade from one of Martha Washington's dresses ended up with family friend Alden Freeman. In 1932, he gave it as a gift to Nan Britton, a woman involved in the first publicized presidential sex scandal. And now you can claim the fabric as your own. Yesterday, it was offered for sale for $40,000 by the Philly-based Raab Collection, which has it in a vault. It may be the only Martha Washington dress snippet ever put on the market.
NEWS
December 16, 2010 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
PHILADELPHIA MADE history once again yesterday with the opening of the President's House on Independence Mall, believed to be the country's first federal commemoration of slavery. The $11.2 million project, known officially as "President's House: Freedom and Slavery in Making a New Nation," stands on the footprint of the original structure where presidents George Washington and John Adams resided from 1790 to 1800. The open-air site, at 6th and Market streets, also pays homage to the nine slaves of African descent who were owned by Washington and worked in the house: Austin, 32, Christopher Sheels, 16, Giles, 32, Hercules, 36, Joe Richardson, 26, Moll, 51, Oney Judge, 17, Paris, 16 and Richmond, 14. Hercules was Washington's chef and Oney Judge was maid to Martha Washington and her grandchildren.
NEWS
May 22, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
About 50 people gathered under the hot sun at Independence Mall on Friday to remember and acknowledge an unusual event - the successful escape of an enslaved African woman from the household of the first president of the United States. "Today, we are here to celebrate the brave and daring escape of Oney Judge," lawyer Michael Coard said through a bullhorn while supporters and onlookers gathered near the corner of Sixth and Market Streets. "It's important that the story of our enslaved ancestors be told.
NEWS
May 22, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
About 50 people gathered under the hot sun at Independence Mall on Friday to remember and acknowledge an unusual event - the successful escape of an enslaved African woman from the household of the first president of the United States. "Today, we are here to celebrate the brave and daring escape of Oney Judge," lawyer Michael Coard said through a bullhorn while supporters and onlookers gathered near the corner of Sixth and Market Streets. "It's important that the story of our enslaved ancestors be told.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve years ago, when Nancy Loane visited Washington's headquarters at Valley Forge National Historical Park, she asked the ranger a facetious question: "Did Martha Washington sleep here?" Loane assumed she knew the answer. So she was surprised when the ranger informed her that Martha not only had slept in the stone house that her husband occupied during the winter of 1777-78 but also had spent four months there. The ranger's reply launched Loane on an odyssey of research and discovery and spawned a passion bordering on obsession.
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