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SPORTS
July 26, 1986 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
His boyhood sports heroes were Muhammad Ali and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. That and an Islamic conversion 14 years ago account for the name of Kareem Ali Jabbar, who may be the most interesting of the 4,000 athletes entered in the U.S. Olympic Festival-'86. At 5-foot-7, the 32-year-old Jabbar is not likely to be mistaken for his basketball namesake. Nor will the 153-pounder pass for a heavyweight. But Jabbar is probably the best-known American practitioner of that ancient Korean martial art called Taekwondo - sometimes known as "kinetic chess.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Moving slowly around the floor, his motion fluid, deliberate and protean, Jonathan B. Walker demonstrates the simple forms but complex effort required by the martial art of tai chi. The sweeping hand motions and body postures are the visible parts of what Walker, 52, a resident of Eastampton, calls his lifestyle. Tai chi "looks at life in its simplest form," he said. "It makes you review your ego-based actions and look inward for answers. " Now Walker, who has practiced tai chi for a decade and teaches it at Burlington County College and other locations, is crusading to popularize the art. This is the second year he has campaigned to have several Burlington County towns dedicate a week to tai chi. Demonstrating his own form of political savvy, he has achieved some success.
LIVING
May 2, 1999 | By Marguerite Del Giudice, FOR THE INQUIRER
When I hobbled home from my first aikido class in January 1997, my middle-aged body creaked like a battered ship that had been drydocked for years and then suddenly sent, unprepared and unarmed, to war. "They knocked me down 300 times," I answered when my husband asked me how it went. "Are you going back?" he asked. "Sure," I murmured, and waddled off to the shower, my hips aching like a pair of 2-by-4's that had been asked to hold up a house. As a young girl, I had yearned to be Grasshopper, the martial-arts priesthood apprentice in the '70s television show Kung Fu. Something in me then had resonated with the idea of the soul expressing itself through the body.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gil Scutti knows stress. The Philadelphia-based trial lawyer says he is attacked - verbally, at least - by judges, clients and other lawyers on a daily basis. But he doesn't scream back. "I don't meet force with force; I blend with it," Scutti, 48, of Voorhees, said. Scutti learned how to channel the negative energy of others into positive energy for himself through the practice of aikido, a Japanese martial art. He began training about four years ago and now holds the rank of second-degree brown belt.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Frank Ortiz, who has a brown belt in karate, likes to practice his martial art in Franklin Delano Roosevelt Park in South Philadelphia, where he says he can "get back to nature. " Yesterday was a picture-perfect day for a little "shadow boxing. "
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | Dan Gross
Terrell Owens faces off with three of his four baby-mamas on Tuesday's episode of "Dr. Phil" (4 p.m., CBS3). Women named Kimber, Monique and Melanie claim the former Eagles wide receiver is delinquent on child-support payments and has little to no relationship with their kids that he fathered. Owens tells Dr. Phil he squandered most of the $80 million he had been paid in the NFL and blamed his travel schedule and living in different cities from the kids as to why he can't see them.
NEWS
December 10, 2007 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
A pleasant 18-year-old with a broad smile and an indomitable spirit, Tyshon has overcome many obstacles resulting from injuries he received when he was struck by a van at age 6. This teenager does not allow his physical challenges to keep him from an active lifestyle. An accomplished athlete, he has received a scholarship for being the "Best Athlete of the Year" at his school. He enjoys playing sports, participates in downhill skiing, and is actively involved in karate. He takes this martial art very seriously and will only train in a dojo - a school that teaches various forms of self-defense.
NEWS
November 7, 1992
TAX BREAK FOR THE RICH After listening to all the rhetoric about the economy and what it will take to revive it, I have come to one conclusion: The need for a cut in the capital gains tax, at least for individuals, is a lot of bull. We are told it is needed to spur investment which on the face of it sounds logical. Think about it, though. You have extra money (over and above that needed to pay your bills and provide basic social needs). What are you going to do with it?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1991 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
Children's events are in full bloom throughout the area this first weekend in May. Tomorrow, Cherry Hill Township presents its second annual Children's Festival at historic Croft Farm. This year's festival, "Preserving Our Natural Treasures," features an afternoon of environmentally- themed activities. Highlights include traveling animal shows from the Philadelphia Zoo and the Academy of Natural Sciences, hands-on craft workshops sponsored by the Please Touch Museum (all participating youngsters should bring a paper bag)
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dun Mark is the kind of person who makes Chinatown a community, not merely a place to live. Cross Spring Street early weekday mornings, cut through the alley to the basketball court tucked behind the Chinese Christian Church, and you'll find Mark teaching tai chi to senior citizens, free of charge. Some of his students are 80 or older. "They're healthy as hell," Mark said. So is he. At 88, Mark is fit, strong, and expecting to be around for a while. His mother lived to 107. On Saturday, he and his graying-but-vibrant students will perform at the 17th annual Mid-Autumn Festival, expected to draw 5,000 to Chinatown from across the Philadelphia region for kung fu exhibitions, Peking opera, health screenings, and a moon cake-eating contest.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2016
A former Camden firefighter was sentenced to seven years in prison Friday for collecting $82,488 from a disability pension, which the state revoked after learning he had competed in a mixed martial arts tournament and was teaching jiu jitsu classes several times a week, authorities said. Superior Court Judge John T. Kelley ordered that Shane B. Streater, 41, of Camden, give back the full amount to the pension system. Streater had been found guilty of theft by deception. Authorities said Streater received a disability pension in 2010 - the same year, investigators later discovered, he had received a black belt in jiu jitsu - after he alleged he was injured when a car struck a fire truck he was riding.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Although Hou Hsiao-Hsien's The Assassin is technically a wuxia film - martial arts, swordplay, the whoosh of arrows in flight - it is much more a film of stillness, quiet, beauty. Set in the waning days of the Tang Dynasty, The Assassin stars a serene and hard-to-read Shu Qi as Nie Yinniang, a woman trained in combat, trained to kill. She returns to her childhood home, to the palace and gardens of Weibo, with a mission she is reluctant to fulfill. There, she finds Tian Ji'an (Chang Chen)
SPORTS
August 12, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lane Johnson threw up nine times during his first three days working with Jay Glazer this summer. He was gifted enough to be the No. 4 overall pick in the 2013 draft and strong enough to start for the Eagles at right tackle the last two seasons, but blocking on Sundays is different than fighting Randy Couture. At the Senior Bowl, Johnson's agent approached Glazer, the Fox Sports reporter who cofounded Unbreakable Performance Center in West Hollywood, Calif. Glazer trains football players in mixed martial arts and Johnson was one of four Eagles who spent time there this offseason.
SPORTS
September 19, 2014 | BY JOHN McGONIGAL, Daily News Staff Writer mcgonij@phillynews.com
STATE COLLEGE - Throwing a haymaker is normally frowned upon in football, and unless you're Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown, kicking isn't usually used to dominate an opponent, either. But those skills, along with a combination of other training methods, have given Penn State senior defensive tackle Anthony Zettel an edge. Zettel, who has racked up seven tackles for loss and three sacks through three games this year, is using his high motor, flexible hips and swift hands to get by offensive linemen and into the backfield.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
NEW radar data indicates that the missing Malaysian airliner detoured around Indonesia, and "Raid 2: Berandal" gives you some idea why. This hyperviolent Indonesian action movie doubles down on all the elements in the cult hit original, "Raid: Redemption" - essentially the story of what appears to be the country's last honest cop, waging a one-man war against the forces of organized crime and co-opted law enforcement. Both movies depict Indonesia as a rolling mob war with civilization somewhere in the distant background (the word "berandal" is Indonesian for "hooligan")
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
IT'S "Hammer" time! The safest place on Earth this weekend is the Tropicana in Atlantic City, where hundreds of martial artists and fighters - including dozens of legends, champions and all-time greats, like Fred "The Hammer" Williamson and Mark "The Hammer" Coleman - will gather for the Hall of Honors, one of the most exciting and compelling events on the planet. "It's the largest martial-arts event of its kind - there's nothing else even a quarter of what we do in size," said Alan Goldberg, publisher of Action Martial Arts Magazine . "We are one of the largest entertainment events even in Atlantic City.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "MAN OF TAI CHI" everybody is not kung fu fighting. One guy is beating the tar out of kung fu specialists with his own version of tai chi, best known for its deliberate movements and meditative attributes. Wayward student Tiger Chen Linhu (Tiger Chen) speeds it up and uses it to kick ass, to the chagrin of his sorrowful master, who warns the young man that his hubris and aggression will be his undoing. Whispering in Tiger's other ear - a ruthless businessman (Keanu Reeves, the movie's director)
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Actor Jim Kelly, 67, who played a glib American martial artist in Enter the Dragon , with Bruce Lee, died of cancer Saturday at his home in San Diego, his ex-wife Marilyn Dishman said. Sporting an Afro hairstyle and sideburns, Mr. Kelly made a splash with his one-liners and fight scenes in the 1973 martial-arts classic. His later films included Three the Hard Way, Black Belt Jones , and Black Samurai. During a 2010 interview with Salon.com, Mr. Kelly said he started studying martial arts in 1964 in Kentucky and later moved to California where he earned a black belt in karate.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
ATLANTIC CITY'S Tropicana Casino Resort might be the safest place on earth this weekend. That's where hundreds of martial artists and fighters - including dozens of legends, champions and all-time greats - will gather for the Hall of Honors, "the largest martial arts event of its kind," said organizer Alan Goldberg, publisher of Action Martial Arts Magazine . "The greatest thing about it is we have probably the top martial arts people and...
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dun Mark is the kind of person who makes Chinatown a community, not merely a place to live. Cross Spring Street early weekday mornings, cut through the alley to the basketball court tucked behind the Chinese Christian Church, and you'll find Mark teaching tai chi to senior citizens, free of charge. Some of his students are 80 or older. "They're healthy as hell," Mark said. So is he. At 88, Mark is fit, strong, and expecting to be around for a while. His mother lived to 107. On Saturday, he and his graying-but-vibrant students will perform at the 17th annual Mid-Autumn Festival, expected to draw 5,000 to Chinatown from across the Philadelphia region for kung fu exhibitions, Peking opera, health screenings, and a moon cake-eating contest.
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