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Marty Stuart

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NEWS
June 29, 1992 | By Dan DeLuca, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Credit for the country music convergence goes out in a lot of directions. There's been an explosion of young singers, from Randy Travis to Garth Brooks to Billy Ray Cyrus, and a premium put on country's "traditional" values in hard economic times. The SoundScan sales-measuring system has given country artists their due on Billboard's pop album chart, just as Nashville has caught on to state-of-the-art recording and marketing techniques. And a whole generation of baby boomers seems to need something more recognizable than the clamor of rap, dance and alternative rock that dominates the radio dial.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was in 1999, Marty Stuart says, that he took the defining turn of his career. The tradition-minded country star had hit the charts regularly in the early '90s with numbers such as "Hillbilly Rock," whose title largely defined his sound at the time. But by the end of the decade radio had cooled on him, and he wasn't happy with the music he was making. "I had been out there so long . . . and had a lot of success chasing that three-minute song up and down Music Row," Stuart recalls from his bus in Louisiana, heading to the next stop on a tour that will take him to the Sellersville Theater for two shows Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Garth Brooks' sales figures sound like McDonald's (over 50 million copies sold!). Twang-free hat acts make it to the top of the pop charts. Nashville assembly-line singers play factory-like showplaces where giant video screens project their images to the rafters. Yes, country music in the '90s has grown hopelessly slick and corporate. Then there's Sunset Park. Just south of U.S. 1 in Jennersville, Pa., it is stuck in a time warp in the Chester County countryside. Since 1940, when it struck "Uncle" Roy Waltman that a country-music park would be a nice sideline to his dairy farm operation, Sunset Park has been presenting shows on summer Sunday afternoons in a picnic-table and cotton-candy environment.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The awards just kept coming last Sunday for Lawrence and Hazel Waltman, owners of Sunset Music Park in Jennersville. There were the plaques from the Grand Ole Opry and the City of Nashville, and the gold records from MCA Records and the Country Music Industry. "We were flabbergasted," Hazel Waltman said of the presentations, which were made by county music star Marty Stuart. The country music industry honored the Waltman family for the 53 years it has been running Sunset Park.
NEWS
December 9, 2012
Kevin Gordon , Gloryland (Crowville). On his first album in seven years, the Nashville-based native Louisianan again blends literate yet elemental storytelling with a similarly rich amalgam of rock, country, blues, folk, and gospel. Not far behind is fellow Music City denizen Tommy Womack, who told more smart, funny, and perceptive aging-rocker tales on his Now What? Wanda Jackson , Unfinished Business (Sugar Hill). At 75, the original "Queen of Rockabilly" can still rock like a "Fujiyama Mama," but this set also showcases her range, as she also kills with girl-group pop, uplifting gospel, and stone-country balladry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Emblazoned on the back of the CD booklet that accompanies the Dixie Chicks' Home are the words: "We are changing the way we do business. " The Chicks have also changed the way they make music. With steel-guitar ace Lloyd Maines helping to produce the trio's third major-label release, Martie Maguire's fiddle and Emily Robison's dobro and banjo are prominent in the mix. All guitars are acoustic and percussion is sparse. Turning away from the perky pop-country that the Chicks took to the bank on Wide Open Spaces and Fly, Home (Open Wide/Sony . )
NEWS
January 23, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
In his gaudy suit and leather pants, with his natural-sounding stage patter and unnaturally silver-tinted shock of hair, Marty Stuart is a real showman. And he's got the stylistic breadth to back up his flash, as his two-hour sold-out performance at the Sellersville Theatre on Saturday night proved yet again. Straight-ahead honky-tonk and rockabilly. Tributes to Johnny Cash and the Lakota Indians. Close-harmony gospel numbers and a solo bluegrass mandolin encore. All that and there was still time for each member of Stuart's three-piece band, His Fabulous Superlatives, to take a vocal lead.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | BY JIM FARBER, New York Daily News and DAVID MEDZERIAN, Orange County Register
INGENUE k.d. lang Sire/Warner Bros. k.d. lang takes a torch to her country roots on her new album. She delivers 10 torch songs, creating a non-stop ode to the treacherous yearning for romance. The twist is, while lang's languid ballads may allude to an earlier era (peopled by the willowy likes of Chet Baker, Peggy Lee and Julie London), she doesn't simply reheat period pieces, as Linda Ronstadt, Carly Simon and Natalie Cole have done. With longtime collaborator Ben Mink, she concocted original songs that stand above their allusions.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
QUOTE "He got up on stage and he was really pumpin' and his veins were bustin' out and you know - I liked it! I wouldn't buy the record, but I liked it. " - Neneh Cherry on Bruce Springsteen, in Musician magazine. CINDY'S VIDEO TAKES BODY SHOT Tattle plants a delighted smooch today upon orthopedists Nicholas DiNubile and Lyle Micheli, who have declared Cindy Crawford's best-selling exercise video, "Shape Your Body Workout," too dangerous for the average leg-lifter.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
'It was an appointment that changed the course of my life when I was 13 years old," says Marty Stuart. He's talking about the first Delaware Valley Bluegrass Festival in Bear, Del., 40 years ago. The great Lester Flatt invited Stuart, then a mandolin-playing teenager, to sit in with his band for four sets that Labor Day weekend, and after the last one, asked him to join the band. After "a whole lot of talking" to persuade his parents, "that's how I said goodbye to my childhood," says Stuart, whose resumé now includes stints in the bands of Doc Watson and Johnny Cash and a hit-filled and critically acclaimed solo career.
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NEWS
December 9, 2012
Kevin Gordon , Gloryland (Crowville). On his first album in seven years, the Nashville-based native Louisianan again blends literate yet elemental storytelling with a similarly rich amalgam of rock, country, blues, folk, and gospel. Not far behind is fellow Music City denizen Tommy Womack, who told more smart, funny, and perceptive aging-rocker tales on his Now What? Wanda Jackson , Unfinished Business (Sugar Hill). At 75, the original "Queen of Rockabilly" can still rock like a "Fujiyama Mama," but this set also showcases her range, as she also kills with girl-group pop, uplifting gospel, and stone-country balladry.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
'It was an appointment that changed the course of my life when I was 13 years old," says Marty Stuart. He's talking about the first Delaware Valley Bluegrass Festival in Bear, Del., 40 years ago. The great Lester Flatt invited Stuart, then a mandolin-playing teenager, to sit in with his band for four sets that Labor Day weekend, and after the last one, asked him to join the band. After "a whole lot of talking" to persuade his parents, "that's how I said goodbye to my childhood," says Stuart, whose resumé now includes stints in the bands of Doc Watson and Johnny Cash and a hit-filled and critically acclaimed solo career.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Freelance
Pop Rufus Wainwright Out of the Game (Decca sssd) Finally, Rufus Wainwright returns to pop. Since 2007's Release the Stars, Wainwright has written an opera (Prima Donna), released a ponderous album of Shakespeare sonnets turned into songs (All Days Are Nights: Songs for Lulu), and re-created, lovingly, Judy Garland's Live at Carnegie Hall set. For Out of the Game, Wainwright drafted producer Mark Ronson, who in turn brought in the Dap-Kings, the R&B band he borrowed from Sharon Jones for Amy Winehouse's Back to Black.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was in 1999, Marty Stuart says, that he took the defining turn of his career. The tradition-minded country star had hit the charts regularly in the early '90s with numbers such as "Hillbilly Rock," whose title largely defined his sound at the time. But by the end of the decade radio had cooled on him, and he wasn't happy with the music he was making. "I had been out there so long . . . and had a lot of success chasing that three-minute song up and down Music Row," Stuart recalls from his bus in Louisiana, heading to the next stop on a tour that will take him to the Sellersville Theater for two shows Sunday.
NEWS
January 23, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
In his gaudy suit and leather pants, with his natural-sounding stage patter and unnaturally silver-tinted shock of hair, Marty Stuart is a real showman. And he's got the stylistic breadth to back up his flash, as his two-hour sold-out performance at the Sellersville Theatre on Saturday night proved yet again. Straight-ahead honky-tonk and rockabilly. Tributes to Johnny Cash and the Lakota Indians. Close-harmony gospel numbers and a solo bluegrass mandolin encore. All that and there was still time for each member of Stuart's three-piece band, His Fabulous Superlatives, to take a vocal lead.
NEWS
September 13, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Johnny Cash, 71, "the Man in Black" whose voice rumbled through archetypal American songs of rebellious outlaws and stubborn faith for more than a half-century, died early yesterday. The revered spokesman for the working man had autonomic neuropathy, a disease of the nervous system, and had been in fragile health since 1997. He succumbed four months after the death of his wife and emotional anchor, the country legend June Carter Cash. "Johnny died due to complications from diabetes, which resulted in respiratory failure," Mr. Cash's manager said in a statement issued by Baptist Hospital in Nashville.
NEWS
May 20, 2003 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stone Temple Pilots singer Scott Weiland was arrested for investigation of drug possession in Burbank, Calif., and released on $10,000 bail Sunday after he was stopped for driving without his lights on. Police didn't say what kinds of drugs Weiland was suspected of having, but he has had several run-ins with the law in recent years. He was arrested in the mid-'90s for investigation of cocaine and heroin possession. Did time in jail in 1999 for repeatedly violating probation and failing to complete drug rehab.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Emblazoned on the back of the CD booklet that accompanies the Dixie Chicks' Home are the words: "We are changing the way we do business. " The Chicks have also changed the way they make music. With steel-guitar ace Lloyd Maines helping to produce the trio's third major-label release, Martie Maguire's fiddle and Emily Robison's dobro and banjo are prominent in the mix. All guitars are acoustic and percussion is sparse. Turning away from the perky pop-country that the Chicks took to the bank on Wide Open Spaces and Fly, Home (Open Wide/Sony . )
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Billy Bob Thornton figures the truest moment he's ever had as an actor came two years ago in Sam Raimi's A Simple Plan. Weary of hiding the $4.4 million they've discovered in a crashed plane, Thornton's slow-witted Jacob Mitchell turns to his brother and makes a poignant confession: "I'm tired. " Thornton is pretty much always tired, too. "I'm an everything-aholic," he says. "Music, work, writing, life. I stay up late all the time. It's a metabolism thing. " He has so many projects working that he not only forgets to sleep, he forgets to eat. It's a nasty habit that helped land Thornton in the hospital in September and has the gals at Sally's Barbecue back home in Alpine, Ark., nagging him to put some more meat on his 6-foot, 145-pound body.
LIVING
June 20, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, New York Daily News and Washington Post
North Philly's Joey Serrano, who'll compete in Nathan's annual July 4 world championship on Coney Island, was hailed yesterday by an event organizer as "the next great hope" to bring the mustard yellow belt back to America after it was lost to a Japanese contestant last summer. "He's a natural, raw talent," said Nathan's George Shea. "He reminds you of Michael Jordan when he was a sophomore in college. " Serrano, 20, who's studying recreation and substance abuse counseling at Philadelphia Community College, won the right to compete by winning a regional contest in Northeast Philly last weekend.
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