CollectionsMarx Brothers
IN THE NEWS

Marx Brothers

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Harpo Marx leans against an ocean-liner wall before a door marked MEN. Several elegant gentlemen walk through the door and are summarily ejected. Harpo shifts his posture. Seems that his raggedy coat has obscured two ever- important letters: WO. It's all in the spirit of Monkey Business (1931), the sublimely silly Marx Brothers comedy about four stowaways who inexplicably consort with bootleggers and more explicably with blondes, such as Thelma Todd. You haven't lived until you've heard Groucho, impersonating Maurice Chevalier, sing "A New Kind of Love.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before it was scratched from last summer's release schedule, Brain Donors (a title which makes absolutely no sense) was called Lame Ducks (a title which makes a little more sense). Marketing whizzes at Paramount probably decided to re-christen this curious venture - which has finally found its way into theaters - when they envisioned gleeful reviewers tripping over themselves to dub this neo-Marx Brothers farce Lame Duck Soup. Actually it's more like a half-lame A Night at the Opera, with a little A Day at the Races thrown in. Except it's set in the world of ballet, and instead of Groucho, Chico and Harpo you have John Turturro, Mel Smith and Bob Nelson.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
The eldest was Leonard. You can tell him by his frantically silly piano stylings, that vaguely foreign-looking hat, his wicked ear for puns and his ridiculous Italian accent - the kind of cruel parody of immigrant dialect that would be picketed nowadays. He was known to the world as Chico. Next came Arthur, who one day acquired - of all things - a harp, which he taught himself to play - beautifully. (But incorrectly: Unlike classically trained harpists, he rested the harp on the wrong shoulder.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are some terrific lounge acts at the Shore, and one of the best is Carte Blanche at Garrity's, 85th Street and Landis Avenue, Sea Isle City, 609-263-3164. Keyboardist John Burgo and singer Lorie Ann, a vivacious duo, perform everything from vintage top 40 to current adult contemporary hits. It's music to dance to, although the restaurant has a bit of an unusual setup with the dance floor in the middle of a dining area ringed by booths. Carte Blanche appears Thursdays and Sundays from 8:30 p.m. to midnight, Fridays from 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Saturdays from 9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. There's no cover charge.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those bulging eyes, that impertinent grin, that shiny, smeared-on mustache, that stump of a cigar, and those eyebrows, thick as raccoon tails, are all part of a wisecrack waiting to happen. Paul Wesolowski knows this; he relishes it. The bulging eyes are everywhere in his New Hope home: on the walls, behind plants, on the television, in the kitchen, in the bathroom, in the bedroom, and even peering up from Wesolowski's wristwatch, daring you to laugh. Finally, you do, at the scale and sheer madness of it all. Wesolowski is the king of Marx Brothers memorabilia.
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
For the first time, there are no dance bands to help ring in the new year - but there are laughs everywhere, including a live comic opera, two allegedly funny New Year's Eve shows, a classic Woody Allen performance and, on three cable services, films by the Marx Brothers. By the way, Channel 65 impulsively went shopping yesterday, so if you were planning to watch Roger Corman's 1960 version of The Little Shop of Horrors tonight at 8, don't bother. Instead of Jack Nicholson and a man-eating plant, you'll see jackknives and a pasta- making machine.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a music career that spanned five decades, Asa "Ace" Pancoast worked on just about every bandstand in Philadelphia, from speak-easies to television studios. He once played for the Marx Brothers and Al Jolson. Mr. Pancoast, 86, who for years led the orchestra at the old Fox Theater at Market and 16th Streets, died Friday at his home in the city's Northwood section. "He was a musician's musician," said his daughter, Geraldine Marmer. She said her father had succeeded in a highly competitive field without any formal education in music.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | by Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
Whoever had the bright idea of making a modern-day Marx Brothers movie should have kept this in mind: The Marx Brothers were funny. Once you get past its title, "Brain Donors" is anything but funny. Impudent and manic, yes, in the best Marxian tradition. But it is desperate in its scattershot stabs at any lame thing for a possible laugh, where the Marxes were always cool and, for the most part, surreally inspired when it came to stringing nonsense together. The film's nominal plot could have been subtitled "A Night at the Ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In one of the the best caricatures in The Line King, which opens today, Al Hirschfeld captures the crazy, vibrant energy of the Marx Brothers. Horse Feathers is a wonderful opportunity to revisit them at close to their best. The 1932 comedy isn't quite up there with Duck Soup, but it's still light-years better than the competition. Who among us could long resist the idea of Groucho shaping young minds as the president of a college? His Professor Wagstaff takes over Huxley College and his motto is, "Whatever it is, I'm against it. " There's a big gridiron matchup in the works against Darwin University, which has sneaked a couple of hefty pro ringers onto its team.
NEWS
April 16, 2011
Arthur Marx, 89, who wrote screenplays for film and television and a best-selling book about his father, Life With Groucho, died Thursday at his home in Los Angeles. As a child Mr. Marx spent several years on the road with Groucho Marx and the rest of the Marx Brothers' vaudeville act - Chico, Harpo, Gummo, and later Zeppo - before enjoying a celebrity-filled youth in Los Angeles as the brothers rose to stardom. His own show-business career was varied and long, writing Hollywood screenplays and scripts for some of television's most popular sitcoms.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 17, 2014
MORE THAN four decades later, Frank Ferrante can still remember the day he discovered Groucho Marx . Not surprising, because it led to his creating a successful show business niche for himself. "My first encounter was a Marx Brothers film, 'A Day at the Races,' when I was 9 years old. I never laughed that hard. These guys thrilled me, particularly Groucho," recalled Ferrante, 51, who Sunday afternoon brings his internationally acclaimed one-man show, "An Evening with Groucho," to Glenside's Keswick Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By G. Allen Johnson, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
The chief virtue of Todd Louiso's Hello I Must Be Going is that it provides an all too rare vehicle for Melanie Lynskey, who was Kate Winslet's partner in crime in Peter Jackson's great 1994 film Heavenly Creatures . Lynskey, best known for her regular role in the sitcom Two and a Half Men , stars as Amy, a 35-year-old hiding out in her parents' swanky house as she goes through a divorce that has left her devastated. One gets the all too obvious impression that her parents (Blythe Danner, John Rubenstein)
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | HACKENSACK RECORD
HACKENSACK, N.J. - Robert Hegyes, the New Jersey-born actor who played Jewish Puerto-Rican wheeler-dealer Juan Luis Pedro Phillipo de Huevos Epstein on the 1970s classic "Welcome Back Kotter," died after an apparent heart attack in his Metuchen, N.J., home yesterday morning. He was 60. Hegyes, who also co-starred on "Cagney and Lacey" and taught occasional master classes at his alma mater, Rowan University, was best known for his work on "Kotter," in which he performed alongside a young John Travolta as one of the tough remedial students known at the Sweathogs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
You've never had a boss as excruciating as Victor. And my guess is that even if you are a boss, and your staff thinks you're a moron, you can't come close. (I know, you're a great boss, you've told the staff yourself.) Victor is the boss, one of two characters in Rich Orloff's play Big Boys , the amusingly dumb and strikingly well-performed production now at Souderton's Montgomery Theater, with one of the region's most seasoned actors, Pete Pryor, as the boss. The other character is young, newly hired Norm, played by Jefferson Haynes, also seen on several area stages.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Sabol's inexplicably long journey to Canton, Ohio, moved - appropriately enough for the man who introduced the technique to the visual lexicon of sports - in slow motion. For decades, as hundreds of those he helped transform into sporting icons were fast-tracked into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the Philadelphian who founded and fostered NFL Films was ignored. But on Saturday, in what figures to be the most well-documented induction ceremony ever at the football-shaped shrine, Sabol, 94, will finally receive the ultimate honor from the game he, as much as any single figure, turned into an American phenomenon.
NEWS
April 16, 2011
Arthur Marx, 89, who wrote screenplays for film and television and a best-selling book about his father, Life With Groucho, died Thursday at his home in Los Angeles. As a child Mr. Marx spent several years on the road with Groucho Marx and the rest of the Marx Brothers' vaudeville act - Chico, Harpo, Gummo, and later Zeppo - before enjoying a celebrity-filled youth in Los Angeles as the brothers rose to stardom. His own show-business career was varied and long, writing Hollywood screenplays and scripts for some of television's most popular sitcoms.
NEWS
July 31, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
A young bon vivant carrying $25,000 in gambling winnings thinks he has killed a New York cabbie in a brawl and flees on the next boat. He ends up on the remote Central American isle of San MaƱana, where he is installed as the American consul. That's the plot of The Dictator - a farce, and pretty far-fetched even for that theatrical genre. In the spring of 1904 it lasted 64 performances on Broadway, a good enough run in those days to be revived with the same cast, including John Barrymore, for another month later the same year.
NEWS
March 17, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Some Philadelphia operagoers have an all-too-sensible golden rule: Never buy tickets for something whose duration is shorter than the travel time required to get to it. By that standard (and many others) the new Metropolitan Opera production of Shostakovich's The Nose is a borderline case at 110 minutes, if not a borderline personality in its satirical story of a petty bureaucrat who wakes up one day without his nose. The whole package - conductor Valery Gergiev, a production full of computer animation by South African artist William Kentridge, and a star performance by South Pacific alumnus Paulo Szot - has added up to the unlikely artistic success of the Met season and something rare in the big-budget opera world: an intellectual event.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Say Goodnight Gracie at the Society Hill Playhouse is an affectionate and corny biodrama by Rupert Holmes about the careers of George Burns and Gracie Allen. Joel Rooks transforms himself into Burns - cigar, round glasses, gunmetal-gray toupee and all - to perform this charming, sentimental show-business story. Burns and Allen were not only a comedy team (he played straight man to her goofy, illogical humor) but also a married couple; they were beloved stars, first in vaudeville, then on radio, then in movies, then on television - theirs was the longest-running sitcom in history.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|