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Mary Mason

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NEWS
June 6, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gar Joseph contributed to this report
WHAT radio talk-show host Mary Mason regularly slammed black politicians who failed to support female African-American candidates in the recent judicial primary. But Mason's desire to win a term on the Fairmount Park Commission may soon be fulfilled at the expense of an African-American woman. The irony isn't lost on June Hairston-Brown, the woman whose seat Mason will likely take unless a compromise is worked out. "This certainly seems to fly in the face of [Mason's views]
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau reporter Mark Fazlollah contributed to this article
At the deadline yesterday, it was Mary Mason no, Milton Street yes. That's how two of the city's more notable political figures cast their ballots on whether to enter the April 26 primary. Mason, a popular radio talk-show host on WWDB-FM, and Street, a former state senator and longtime political lightning rod, had been hinting for weeks that they intended to seek political office - Mason eying the Seventh District state Senate seat being vacated by Freeman Hankins and Street itching for a primary rematch against state Rep. Ruth Harper, the Democrat who represents the 196th District.
NEWS
January 6, 1988 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
Rep. Chaka Fattah says he is running for Freeman Hankins' state Senate seat whether the ailing Hankins retires or not. But Fattah may have an unexpected, well-known opponent if the senator bows out: radio talk-show host Mary Mason. "Should Sen. Hankins decide not to run, I would give serious considerations to a possible race, but only with his full support," Mason said last night in a prepared statement released to the Daily News by a family friend. Hankins spokesman Larry Diehl, meanwhile, said today that the senator wouldn't be influenced by the announcements.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where will veteran talker Mary Mason land? The saga continues. The latest word is that Mason, who was a fixture on WHAT-AM (1340) for almost three decades, may very well be headed for WCAU-AM (1210). Mason couldn't be reached last week for comment. And 'CAU general manager Chris Whiting said only: "When there's an announcement to be made, we'll make it. " But people who know Mason are talking. Basically, they say she has told friends that a deal with 'CAU is all but done.
NEWS
August 1, 1986 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
Mary Mason signed on for her last "Mornings With Mary" on WHAT-AM at 7:02 a.m. today by announcing she felt so good she had walked to work. At 7:04 a.m., she cut off her first caller. "I won't have a chance to cut you off for a long time," Mason said affectionately to a woman who was gushing her prayers and best wishes. The legendary and controversial Mason, feisty as ever, leaves WHAT (1340) today after 28 years on the air as a talk show hostess and spinner of gospel records to the station's predominantly black audience.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
Controversial talk-show host Mary Mason, who has worked for nearly 30 years in local broadcasting, has left all-talk WWDB-FM (96.5). WWDB general manager Chuck Schwartz said that Mason and station management yesterday "mutually agreed" to terminate her contract, effective immediately. Mason "wants to devote more time to her family and other interests," Schwartz said. Mason could not be reached for comment. Mason, 57, had been on vacation for several weeks; her last on-air appearance was Jan. 29, Schwartz said.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | By Gail Shister Inquirer staff writer Robert J. Terry and David Walstad contributed to this report
Philadelphia police are investigating a car accident that involved controversial WWDB-FM (96.5) talk-show host Mary Mason to determine whether to take further action. According to Police Department sources, Mason, 57, backed her car into the doorman at the Latham Hotel on 17th Street Wednesday night, sending him to Graduate Hospital complaining of pains in his back and hip. Arleigh Goodwin, 55, of Thorofare, N.J., yesterday underwent surgery. A Graduate Hospital spokeswoman was unable to comment on his condition.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | By Michael Sokolove, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was no nice way to pose the question, so radio host Mary Mason asked it bluntly: "Did you kill your daughter?" she asked Vivian King, the mother of slain track star Shilie Turner. "No, I didn't," King replied last Wednesday on Mason's show on WHAT-AM. Mason didn't believe her. In fact, she said, about a week before that broadcast, she had called Police Commissioner Richard Neal to urge him to have homicide investigators home in on King. King was arrested yesterday and charged with her daughter's murder.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | By Pamela Noel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Mason's back on WHAT. Beginning tomorrow, she'll be reigning over drive time, 7 to 10 a.m. weekdays on 1340 AM, reviving her Mornings With Mary call-in. But that's only half the story. Beginning next Monday, Georgie Woods is also returning to 'HAT. He'll follow Mason, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. It's quite a coup for 'HAT owner Cody Anderson. "I feel very fortunate to be able to get the two most professional, most experienced African-American talk-show hosts in this city and perhaps in this country," a triumphant Anderson said Friday.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Mason back on the radio? OK, so there have been a couple of earlier false alarms about the scrappy Philadelphia radio veteran, but consider this: After months of rumors, Cody Anderson, former general manager of WDAS-AM/ FM, has finally purchased WHAT-AM (1340). The price: $1.65 million. The plan: a black-oriented talk format. "Mary and I have not officially talked yet," Anderson said Friday, "but if you talk about black-oriented talk, you have to consider Mary. At some point, I'll probably talk to her. " Mason, once queen of black talk radio in Philadelphia, and Anderson, once king of 'DAS, have never been kindred spirits.
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NEWS
December 31, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ONE DAY, when Lillian Cosby was 15, she begged her mother not to send her to school that day. She had dreamt that she would be struck by a car on her way to school. It was such a clear premonition that she was sure it would happen. Her mother, of course, would hear none of it. She packed her daughter off as usual, and, sure enough, she was hit by a truck. She had to be hospitalized. "I was so mad at my mother I wouldn't go home for three days," she said in an interview with the Inquirer in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | Jenice Armstrong
PHILLY'S Mark Indelicato, who's known for his role as a teenager in ABC's "Ugly Betty," turns 18 on Monday. According to the stars, Indelicato, who got his start at the Walnut Street Theatre, has a busy, challenging year ahead, one in which he needs to guard against impulsiveness. But he can rest assured that during this year of transition, his creativity also is predicted to be on an upswing.   Beatrice Elmore Turner, better known as the legendary radio diva Mary Mason, celebrates a birthday on Wednesday.
NEWS
January 16, 2007
MARY MASON was a household name within the African-American community - in broadcasting more than 40 years. Like her or not, what the new owners did was a smack in the face of all her listeners (white or black). I never called the woman, but did listen to her. She was rude to a lot of her callers whose ideas were in contrast to hers - she also gave hope to those who desperately needed it. But the new ownership was so arrogant they wouldn't even allow Ms. Mason to wish farewell to all of her followers over decades.
NEWS
January 13, 2007 | By Annette John-Hall and Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
If you turned on the radio yesterday morning expecting to hear Mary Mason and got B.B. King instead, don't blame it on coffee deprivation. Philadelphia station WHAT (1340 AM), known for years as the "Voice of the African American Community," is no longer. On Thursday afternoon, all station employees - including weekday hosts Albert Butler, Elmer Smith, Thera Martin Connelly, and morning drive queen Mason - were handed pink slips by Inner-City Broadcasting, their futures uncertain.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2003 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's go out on a limb here (and it's a sturdy one) to posit that there are few morning talk-radio shows in town worth setting a clock to. On Thursday, in an unprecedented experiment, two of the hosts sat down together for two hours to hash out the mayor's race, in a simulcast. (If you missed it, it will be rerun at 8 p.m. tomorrow on WPHT-AM [1210].) Mary Mason of WHAT-AM (1340) is an African American Democrat, a supporter of Mayor Street. Michael Smerconish of WPHT is a white Republican and backer of Sam Katz.
NEWS
June 5, 2002
HOW TO interpret the internecine ruckus that rocked the walls of Memorial Hall Monday when the new Fairmount Park Commission met for the first time? After the unanimous election of Robert Nix III as president, the election of the rest of the officers was disrupted and then tabled until the next meeting. John Binswanger was announced as a candidate for vice president, as was Debra Wolf Goldstein, a newcomer. Binswanger withdrew his name to clear the way for Goldstein, but some members balked at voting for an unknown.
NEWS
October 5, 2001
IWAS ASTOUNDED to read what Mary Mason said about the tragedy: That she wasn't sure that black people care enough because it wasn't them. Mary Mason does not have that big a following to state what black people feel, and if anyone made such statements to her, it was a small group of ignorant people. Incidentally. Mary, there were scores of black people involved in the tragedy. Patricia Cole, Philadelphia Mary Mason: Black Americans are in a state of shock at this outrageous and cowardly attack on our nation.
NEWS
September 29, 2001
I USUALLY find columnist John Smallwood's articles stimulating and entertaining, and consider him very sports-intelligent. But after looking at the paper's back cover (Sept. 26) with a geriatric Michael Jordan on it and reading his column, I'm disappointed. To make a statement like, "Once it all plays out, Jordan won't end up as one of the NBA's top 20 players" is ludicrous. Any form of MJ is better than the do-rag, hip-hop, overpaid young punks we see today. Do you think a Sixers team with 37-year-old Jordan instead of Allen Iverson would have lost to the Lakers?
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Whether she's on the air with Mayor Rendell, bantering with her legions of devoted WHAT-AM listeners or raking yet another hapless politician over the coals, Mary Mason's a woman who knows what she wants. She's the same way in her private life. On the infrequent occasions this grande dame of Philadelphia's airwaves dines out, she tends to stick to her tried-and-true favorites - Zanzibar Blue and Old Original Bookbinder's. "People need to understand that a favorite restaurant is not just the food.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
If there's "A Brighter Day Ahead" for Mary Mason, it looks like it will be on WHAT radio. Philadelphia talk radio's most influential voice said yesterday that, after meeting with owner Cody Anderson, she has decided to stay on the low-power station (1340 AM) where she began her career spinning gospel records exactly 40 years ago last month. A move has been rumored since Anderson's decision last summer to switch Mason to midday from her morning drive-time slot, which he filled with his son, Bill.
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