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Mary Matalin

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NEWS
August 8, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Mary Matalin, President Bush's outspoken deputy campaign manager, stirred things up again yesterday, saying that despite his disavowal the President approved of her reference to "bimbo eruptions" in the Clinton campaign. The President "was not upset. He said it was perfectly legitimate," Matalin said on the Evans and Novak interview show to be broadcast today on CNN. Meanwhile yesterday, GOP officials said several male delegates had turned in their credentials so that more women could attend the Aug. 17-20 Republican convention, and Vice President Quayle hinted there would be a floor debate on abortion.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | By Charles Green, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the highest-ranking woman in the Bush campaign, 38-year-old Mary Matalin has a reputation as a tough-talking, street-smart operative with a passion for hardball politics. "Mary is by nature a street fighter," said Mark Goodin, a Republican political consultant. "She enjoys mixing it up. She's not deterred by the taste of blood. " Matalin, the political director of President Bush's campaign, sparked a controversy Sunday with a news release attacking "sniveling hypocritical Democrats" that revived allegations of womanizing against Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From MICHAEL LACING
TOP HEAVY Tragedy struck the U.S. Olympic team during closing ceremonies when an unidentified member was crushed by the weight of the advertisements on his warm-up uniforms. YOU'RE WRONG, KISS ME Mary Matalin, deputy manager of the George Bush campaign and author of the infamous "sleaze memo," is romantically linked to Bill Clinton strategist James Carville. Politics makes for strange bedfellows. LIGHT READING Last week, 30th aniversary of the death of Marilyn Monroe, saw the number of people writing books about the star actually outnumber those who saw her films.
NEWS
August 5, 1992
There's truth to the adage that one should never watch sausage - or laws - being made. The same is true for political campaigns. When they're done skillfully, we usually don't. We swallow the metaphors whole, without thinking too much about fat or acid content. If the manipulators are good, we don't even know why we've got indigestion. Perhaps that's the real lesson of the latest uproar in the presidential campaign. After all, Mary Matalin, deputy campaign manager for Bush-Quayle, was only following the traditional recipe for negative campaign sausage.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Before Motown, there was Steeltown for the Jackson 5. A 1967 recording made by the singing brothers in their hometown of Gary, Ind., for Steeltown Records will be released this summer. The original was released only regionally, with an 8-year-old Michael Jackson singing lead vocals. Steeltown President Ben Brown found the master tapes in his house last year. Inverted Records of New York acquired the tapes and remastered them digitally. The first single, "Big Boy," will be released June 1, along with a video.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer USA Today and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Kelsey Grammer, who hit 40 on Tuesday, isn't expected to appear at the New Jersey courtroom where a grand jury is considering whether to hit him with sexual assault charges. The prosecutor, who began a formal investigation yesterday, says that decision will be made on the "evidence in the case," not on who Grammer is. Meanwhile, life for "Frasier," a TV shrink, goes on big time. Grammer's real-life fiancee, Tammi Alexander, threw him a party - he made like a chef at the barbecue - at their L.A. digs on Saturday, even though her darling is accused of having sex with a teen-ager who is testifying.
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | BY ANN GERHART Daily News wire services, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, the Washington Post, the New York Times and USA Today contributed to this report
HER SNIT TO HIT THE FANS, HOWIE Can it be that Howard Stern's fans finally have met their match? Lori Gedon from Hackensack, N.J., is fighting back with all the techno-tools and computer printouts in her arsenal. The calls have started up again, since the New Jersey Realtor sued the shock jock last Friday. As of yesterday, Gedon said, she'd received more than 800 angry calls and threats from listeners inflamed that she was gunning for their idol. "You bet we plan to go after these people," she said.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The blue-jean boys are back, only they're not wearing jeans anymore. They're done up in pricey threads, and they're huffing and puffing their way across the hot-air circuit. Success has come to James Carville and Paul Begala, the erstwhile down-and- dirty renegade political consultants who launched Harris Wofford in the Senate two years ago and, in their next miracle, helped elect Bill Clinton president. On the merry-go-round that has become their speaking schedule, they dropped off briefly in Philadelphia last night to address 250 lawyer-members of the 1993 Federation Allied Jewish Appeal.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | by Kathleen Shea, Daily News Television Critic
The first sonorous voice the dedicated election-evening viewer tuned in to yesterday went with the funny-for-TV face of talk-show host Larry King on CNN. There he was on a special hour show at 5 p.m., an hour-and-a-half before everybody else geared up, tossing smiling softballs to the honchos of the Bush, Clinton and Perot campaigns. "Larry, thank you for what you've done for the process," Bush handler Mary Matalin gushed, having just finished several minutes of unchallenged news media bashing.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The fake hissing match came first: "We're going to start off with a little female mud wrestling," began Mary Matalin, George Bush's deputy campaign director. "She was a gutter shrew," broke in Betsey Wright, her counterpart for the Clinton campaign. "Takes one to know one," finished Matalin, with a smile. Last night, the two were reprising the 1992 presidential campaign as guests of honor at a women's leadership conference sponsored by Rutgers University's Eagleton Institute of Politics.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER CONVENTION BUREAU
Bob Grant, the rambunctious New York radio talk-show host, was defending the gold standard. Roger Hedgecock, a San Diego host, was debating with a woman who wanted to tax meat because it's so unhealthy. Neil Boron of Rochester, N.Y., told his audience he was dismayed because no speaker at the Republican National Convention had been assigned to forthrightly defend the platform's antiabortion plank. And if retired Gen. Colin Powell is "talking about ideological inclusion, I have a problem with that," he said.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the record, say the people who run national political campaigns, all the Sunday morning talk shows are equal and they'd just as soon have their candidate on one as another. "I love 'em all," said one Republican operative with a laugh. Off the record, according to interviews with a half-dozen political spokesmen and impresarios, NBC's Meet the Press with Tim Russert is at the top of almost everyone's pecking order, even though it has smaller ratings than ABC's This Week With David Brinkley, the second choice for the pros.
LIVING
June 22, 1995 | By C. DeLeon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, New York Post, Inquirer staff writer Herb Lowe and Washington Post
Former presidential press secretary Dee Dee Myers lobbed a few bombs at the Republican Party yesterday morning during an $850-a-plate fund-raising breakfast at Garden State Park sponsored by the Camden County Democrat Committee. "They came in promising change, and in some ways they have - Bob Dole and Newt Gingrich are getting along," Myers said about the sometimes contentious relationship between Senate and House leaders of the new GOP congressional majority. "I think watching them shake hands is as convincing as watching Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie Presley kiss.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Before Motown, there was Steeltown for the Jackson 5. A 1967 recording made by the singing brothers in their hometown of Gary, Ind., for Steeltown Records will be released this summer. The original was released only regionally, with an 8-year-old Michael Jackson singing lead vocals. Steeltown President Ben Brown found the master tapes in his house last year. Inverted Records of New York acquired the tapes and remastered them digitally. The first single, "Big Boy," will be released June 1, along with a video.
LIVING
May 15, 1995 | This report contains information from Inquirer staffers Dan DeLuca and Faith Quintavell, and the Associated Press
Carroll O'Connor says that drug use was rampant on the set of his long- running TV cop show, In the Heat of the Night, but that he was powerless to do anything about it. O'Connor - whose son, Hugh, killed himself in March following a history of drug abuse - said he "gathered together the heads of departments, and said, 'Boys, help me find out who's doing the using and who's doing the selling.' " O'Connor said no one paid much attention to his plea. "I think they were laughing at me," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1995 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Staring the dragon in the eye, PBS tonight broadcasts Frontline: "Rush Limbaugh's America," examining the man and the phenomenon. Washington conservatives are taking dead aim at PBS, and you'd think Frontline would go digging dirt on, say, Hillary Rodham Clinton, not on the person who may be most responsible for the Republican majority. But PBS and Frontline are feisty little fellows, not about to turn away from issues of importance. And Rush Limbaugh is important. "You cannot underestimate, and you cannot overstate, the power of Rush Limbaugh," says Mary Matalin, campaign director for former President George Bush, who wooed Limbaugh's support away from Pat Buchanan in the 1992 presidential election by inviting Limbaugh to sleep over at the White House.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer USA Today and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Kelsey Grammer, who hit 40 on Tuesday, isn't expected to appear at the New Jersey courtroom where a grand jury is considering whether to hit him with sexual assault charges. The prosecutor, who began a formal investigation yesterday, says that decision will be made on the "evidence in the case," not on who Grammer is. Meanwhile, life for "Frasier," a TV shrink, goes on big time. Grammer's real-life fiancee, Tammi Alexander, threw him a party - he made like a chef at the barbecue - at their L.A. digs on Saturday, even though her darling is accused of having sex with a teen-ager who is testifying.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | By Daniel LeDuc and Pam Belluck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Three days before the breakfast with national political reporters at which he said that Gov.-elect Christie Whitman's campaign had spent $500,000 to suppress black voter turnout, Republican consultant Ed Rollins made the same claim to two acquaintances. Those acquaintances' accounts could cast renewed doubt on Rollins' sworn explanation of why he made - and later recanted - the controversial remarks. On Nov. 6, four days after New Jersey's gubernatorial election, Rollins told Mary Matalin, a Republican consultant, that he "had paid off black ministers," Matalin said yesterday.
NEWS
November 4, 1993 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Could it be that after finally losing a big one - New Jersey - James Carville, the hard-knocking, face-eating Hannibal Lecter of Democratic politics, is actually becoming a wuss? Listen in on that Louisiana drawl, the morning after: "In a ham-and-egg breakfast, the chicken participates and the hog is committed," Gov. Florio's political strategist is saying. "For a long time in campaigns, I've been a hog. Now, I'm going to have a wife and I'm going to have to be a chicken in my work.
LIVING
October 28, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marv Albert says his scheduled appearance on NBC's Today show to plug his book, I'd Love to But I Have a Game, was scotched Monday by Bryant Gumbel because the book's co-author, Rick Reilly, is on the host's clip list. Five years ago Reilly penned an unflattering profile of Gumbel for Sports Illustrated in which he wrote - among many things - that Gumbel's 68-year-old mother got nothing from her rich son, lived in a sweltering apartment and had to take the bus to her clerk's job because she couldn't afford a car. Albert quoted Gumbel as saying: "Nothing personal, but if Reilly is involved it's not something we're going to do. " Added the sportscaster: "He didn't sound angry, but I wasn't going to debate him. I'll be all over the place anyway.
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