CollectionsMary Todd Lincoln
IN THE NEWS

Mary Todd Lincoln

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Christian Johnson, a man who identifies himself as a portrayer of American history but who is in fact the designated hitter for Abraham Lincoln, came to Holy Family College last week to dazzle Northeast Philadelphians. Johnson's mission was to address the Delaware Valley Civil War Roundtable on the 129th anniversary of Lincoln's famous speech at Gettysburg. In his Lincoln role, he was quick to remind the crowd that humor was Abe's forte, and that you're never fully dressed without a smile.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Selma Mansion in Norristown has been home at one time or another to a noted Revolutionary War general, governors of Pennsylvania and Michigan, the founder of Lafayette College, and the mother of Mary Todd Lincoln. Now, pigeons roost in the upstairs parlor and sewing room of the once grand county estate, which was originally part of a 115-acre farm. Today, the Norristown Preservation Society will dedicate a historical marker on the site of the house, at Selma and Airy Streets.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Lori Montgomery of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
At the White House, they can't change the sheets fast enough in the Lincoln Bedroom. One week, newly elected Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer bunked in the big rosewood bed. Another week, it was Georgia Gov. Zell Miller. This week, British Prime Minister John Major slept over. Betty Monkman, a White House curator, said there's no doubt the Clintons invite guests to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom "more than some previous administrations. " "This reflects the Clintons' style of entertaining, welcoming people to their home," said Neel Lattimore, a spokesman for Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through an open door came the sound of labored, heavy breathing and groans as President Abraham Lincoln lay dying from a gunshot wound to the head. First lady Mary Todd Lincoln passed from the room into a hallway, moaning with inconsolable grief, "O, my God, and have I given my husband to die?" The long death vigil at the Petersen House in Washington unfolded before James Tanner, who'd been summoned to record the testimony of witnesses to the assassination at Ford's Theatre. Though not widely known, Tanner's shorthand and transcribed cursive from the night of April 14, 1865, and morning of April 15, 1865, survived and are kept in an acid-free box in a vault at the Union League of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
"An arrest in the Boston Marathon bombing has been made. " - CNN, et al., before any arrest By Steve Young With technology continuing to ramp up our ability to transmit news at breakneck speed, along with the public's insatiable need to know something ASAP, the media have been painfully susceptible to rapid-fire misfiring in the race for "breaking news" and ratings. Makes one wonder what might have been if today's media had been around a few years earlier. Jonestown More of a Picnic Than a Punishment, CNN, Nov. 18, 1978 - John King reports that, according to a source close to the situation, "the Peoples Temple group in Guyana, thought to be a treacherous cult, has been proven to be just a well-meaning paradise, as leader Jim Jones has just distributed what I'm told is delicious, specially-prepared, grape-flavored Kool-Aid.
NEWS
November 4, 2011
By William C. Kashatus History, according to a popular aphorism, is what the present chooses to remember about the past. The danger is that the past can be exploited to serve present agendas. The most recent example of this is Mark Segal, publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News. Segal chose to celebrate LGBT History Month, which ended this week, with a series of features on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people who helped "create this country. " He launched his literary offensive partly in response to tea-party conservatives who suggested the Founding Fathers were somehow at odds with homosexuality.
TRAVEL
February 25, 2013 | By Beth J. Harpaz, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Whether you're interested in Lincoln the president or Lincoln the movie, Washington is a downright thrilling destination. Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States and one of the country's most admired, rising from humble roots in a frontier cabin to become a self-educated lawyer and brilliant politician. As president, he ended slavery by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation and preserved the nation despite the Civil War. The story of his assassination is one of the best-known chapters of American history.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
The tranquility and seclusion of Glen Isle Farm contrast with a past where pioneers and soldiers drank ale and smoked clay pipes on its varnished wood floors. After serving as a stop for travelers heading west from Philadelphia, a tavern was moved from the property, and Glen Isle became a residence with serene formal gardens. Raucous behavior was limited to Tom and Betty Moran's children fighting over whose bedroom George Washington slept in. According to Washington's diaries, he slept in the house on June 3, 1773, as he traveled from New York to his home at Mount Vernon, Va. After 25 years and eight children, Tom and Betty Moran are selling the historic farmhouse and surrounding 7.2 acres on the western edge of Downingtown Borough.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | By Ross K. Baker
The revelations in Bob Woodward's new book, The Choice, suggest that the White House has become a kind of New Age citadel, with Hillary Rodham Clinton enlisting the help of a "sacred psychologist" to converse with First Ladies up in the great Rose Garden in the sky. It does sound moonstruck. And it will undoubtedly confirm in the minds of Mrs. Clinton's detractors that she is not only a left-wing barnburner but also a goofy inhabitant of the ozone layer. Elect a baby boomer couple to the White House, the reasoning goes, and they just bring their mystical baggage with them.
TRAVEL
December 23, 2012 | By Samantha Critchell, Associated Press
MANCHESTER, Vt. - Abe Lincoln was born in a log cabin, but his son built himself a mansion. Robert Todd Lincoln, the only child of the president to survive to adulthood, built the Georgian Revival home, called Hildene, as a seasonal dream home for his wife, Mary Harlan Lincoln, and their children. But Hildene is no dusty museum. Located on 412 acres (167 hectares) between two spectacular mountain ranges, the homestead offers a feeling of warmth, family, and hospitality along with the history lessons.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through an open door came the sound of labored, heavy breathing and groans as President Abraham Lincoln lay dying from a gunshot wound to the head. First lady Mary Todd Lincoln passed from the room into a hallway, moaning with inconsolable grief, "O, my God, and have I given my husband to die?" The long death vigil at the Petersen House in Washington unfolded before James Tanner, who'd been summoned to record the testimony of witnesses to the assassination at Ford's Theatre. Though not widely known, Tanner's shorthand and transcribed cursive from the night of April 14, 1865, and morning of April 15, 1865, survived and are kept in an acid-free box in a vault at the Union League of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
"An arrest in the Boston Marathon bombing has been made. " - CNN, et al., before any arrest By Steve Young With technology continuing to ramp up our ability to transmit news at breakneck speed, along with the public's insatiable need to know something ASAP, the media have been painfully susceptible to rapid-fire misfiring in the race for "breaking news" and ratings. Makes one wonder what might have been if today's media had been around a few years earlier. Jonestown More of a Picnic Than a Punishment, CNN, Nov. 18, 1978 - John King reports that, according to a source close to the situation, "the Peoples Temple group in Guyana, thought to be a treacherous cult, has been proven to be just a well-meaning paradise, as leader Jim Jones has just distributed what I'm told is delicious, specially-prepared, grape-flavored Kool-Aid.
TRAVEL
February 25, 2013 | By Beth J. Harpaz, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Whether you're interested in Lincoln the president or Lincoln the movie, Washington is a downright thrilling destination. Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States and one of the country's most admired, rising from humble roots in a frontier cabin to become a self-educated lawyer and brilliant politician. As president, he ended slavery by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation and preserved the nation despite the Civil War. The story of his assassination is one of the best-known chapters of American history.
TRAVEL
December 23, 2012 | By Samantha Critchell, Associated Press
MANCHESTER, Vt. - Abe Lincoln was born in a log cabin, but his son built himself a mansion. Robert Todd Lincoln, the only child of the president to survive to adulthood, built the Georgian Revival home, called Hildene, as a seasonal dream home for his wife, Mary Harlan Lincoln, and their children. But Hildene is no dusty museum. Located on 412 acres (167 hectares) between two spectacular mountain ranges, the homestead offers a feeling of warmth, family, and hospitality along with the history lessons.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
NEW YORK - When Sally Field talks about the "weight of the role" she has in Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," she's not kidding. "I gained 25 pounds to play her," said the two-time Oscar winner. "And then I had to have knee surgery. " The actress didn't say whether surgery was worth it, but Fields' portrayal of Mary Todd Lincoln - wife of the 16th president and one of the more problematic figures in the American political pantheon - has become one of the more talked-about aspects of Spielberg's Civil War epic.
NEWS
November 4, 2011
By William C. Kashatus History, according to a popular aphorism, is what the present chooses to remember about the past. The danger is that the past can be exploited to serve present agendas. The most recent example of this is Mark Segal, publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News. Segal chose to celebrate LGBT History Month, which ended this week, with a series of features on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people who helped "create this country. " He launched his literary offensive partly in response to tea-party conservatives who suggested the Founding Fathers were somehow at odds with homosexuality.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Selma Mansion in Norristown has been home at one time or another to a noted Revolutionary War general, governors of Pennsylvania and Michigan, the founder of Lafayette College, and the mother of Mary Todd Lincoln. Now, pigeons roost in the upstairs parlor and sewing room of the once grand county estate, which was originally part of a 115-acre farm. Today, the Norristown Preservation Society will dedicate a historical marker on the site of the house, at Selma and Airy Streets.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | By Ellen O'Brien and Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the midst of the unprecedented political upheaval in Washington, the only clear winner appears to be Hillary Rodham Clinton. Her marriage may be the butt of jokes, but she's more popular now than ever. Yesterday, a few hours before the impeachment voting, she stood before the Democratic members of the House of Representatives and delivered one last appeal for her husband. And her words were far more personal than any she has spoken publicly in recent weeks. "I love and care deeply about my husband," she said.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | By Ross K. Baker
The revelations in Bob Woodward's new book, The Choice, suggest that the White House has become a kind of New Age citadel, with Hillary Rodham Clinton enlisting the help of a "sacred psychologist" to converse with First Ladies up in the great Rose Garden in the sky. It does sound moonstruck. And it will undoubtedly confirm in the minds of Mrs. Clinton's detractors that she is not only a left-wing barnburner but also a goofy inhabitant of the ozone layer. Elect a baby boomer couple to the White House, the reasoning goes, and they just bring their mystical baggage with them.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Lori Montgomery of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
At the White House, they can't change the sheets fast enough in the Lincoln Bedroom. One week, newly elected Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer bunked in the big rosewood bed. Another week, it was Georgia Gov. Zell Miller. This week, British Prime Minister John Major slept over. Betty Monkman, a White House curator, said there's no doubt the Clintons invite guests to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom "more than some previous administrations. " "This reflects the Clintons' style of entertaining, welcoming people to their home," said Neel Lattimore, a spokesman for Hillary Rodham Clinton.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|