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Mary Wells

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NEWS
July 29, 1992 | By Terry Bitman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Wells beat them all to the punch. With a sunny style and a cha-cha cadence, it was this Detroit native, not the Supremes or the Temptations or the Four Tops, who gave the legendary Motown record label its first national number-one hit, the incomparable "My Guy" in 1964. You can't call Wells, who died of cancer Sunday at age 49, the Queen of Soul. Aretha Franklin earned that title about a half-decade after Wells scored with the single "Bye Bye Baby" in 1961. But it would be apt to call her a pioneer.
NEWS
October 29, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WELDON MCDOUGAL was a teenager when he and other boys who had formed a soul singing group decided to try out their music in an aunt's back yard. It was a Sunday afternoon and the aunt and a group of church ladies were having tea. The boys sang "Work With Me," a song on the R&B charts that some stations had refused to air because of its raunchy lyrics. "We couldn't have picked a worse number if we tried," McDougal told Bob Bosco, local writer and music historian, in an interview.
NEWS
April 10, 2005 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It will be a treat for Mary Wells to sleep past 5:30 a.m. Sleeping in is high on the list of priorities for when she retires as president and chief executive officer of Family Service on Jan. 6. Wells, 62, has been with the agency since its inception in the 1960s. Since 1978, she has led the organization, which serves about 12,000 people a year in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Cumberland and Monmouth Counties on a budget of about $26.5 million. Family Service provides counseling, foster care, group homes, crisis intervention and assistance to mental health clients, and other services.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
When singer Kim Weston recalls the Uptown Theater, she remembers making a stunning entrance in a beautiful skintight gown that brought the crowd to a frenzy in the early 1960s. "I started singing behind the curtain," said Weston, who had hit records on the emerging Motown label. "When they finally opened up the curtains, somebody in the audience yelled, 'Oh my God, how much for the dress?' " Weston said. "That young man and I grew to be good friends. " Weston, who in 1966 recorded the iconic hit duet "It Takes Two" with Marvin Gaye and had solo records as well, was sharing her recollections Thursday with students in a Temple University class devoted to the historic Uptown and another class focused on Motown Records.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
It should be difficult to feel threatened by such an unobtrusive trio: Kathy, 25, who likes to read mystery books and is going back to school to get her general equivalency diploma. Joe, 43, who likes to copy images portrayed in books and magazines. And Joanne, 41, who likes to dance and watch movies. But their imminent presence in an upscale development in Westampton was enough to incite residents to become vigilantes for their exclusion last year, setting the stage for vandals, who flooded the house mere weeks before the new residents were scheduled to arrive.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Despite neighbors' concerns about a group home from which a resident fled before assaulting a 6-year-old girl, the Borough Council said Tuesday night that it had no control over such homes, which are protected by federal law. Duly Torres, 19, a resident of the Azure Lane Group Home for autistic teenagers, fled about 4:45 p.m. Sunday and entered two homes on Hawthorne Street, damaging furniture in the first and, in the second, grabbing a young...
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1968, Family Service of Burlington County was a fledgling counseling agency, and Mary Wells, a newly graduated social worker and a homemaker pregnant with her second child, was helping it to its feet. From her Moorestown living room, between vacuuming and spoon-feeding her son, just months old, the 25-year-old offered consolation by telephone to depressed teenagers and women suffering from domestic abuse. A 24-hour hotline was a new concept back then, Wells said, but because the service was needed, she volunteered to help.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1993 | By Mark Marymont, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Rhythm and Blues Foundation is housed in a crowded room on the fourth floor of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, hardly funky digs for a group that promotes the gritty, soulful music of the '40s, '50s and '60s. "Hey, it's a great address. I hope we stay here forever," said foundation executive director Suzan E. Jenkins, leading the way down a long and winding hallway, past models of Army tanks and other military memorabilia, to her windowless office, where she works with her one full-time assistant.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press, Reuters and USA Today contributed to this report
Czech President Vaclav Havel is heading a new attempt to get Salman Rushdie off Islam's death row, it was disclosed yesterday in London. In a letter to Iranian President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, Havel and 21 other signers called for a "positive, generous and tolerant spirit" in revoking the contract on the author's life for his novel The Satanic Verses, which Islamic fundamentalists contend trashes their religion. "An end to this disturbing and unacceptable situation must now be found," the letter stated.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The supervisor of a Burlington County program for troubled young adults coerced one of his clients, a 19-year-old woman, into having sex with him by threatening to drop her from the program, authorities alleged yesterday. Oscar J. Brooks Jr., who is also assistant women's basketball coach at Rutgers University in Camden, was arrested yesterday morning and charged with sexually assaulting the woman, a second-degree offense that carries a maximum penalty of 10 years. Stephen G. Raymond, the Burlington County Prosecutor, said Brooks had gotten the woman to come to his apartment on Monday to have sex, and later threatened to kill her if she told anyone about it. Brooks, 30, of Maple Shade, was supervisor of Young Adults in Transition, a division of Family Service of Burlington County, from June 5 until yesterday, when he was fired after his arrest.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Elizabeth Wells, 93, who was born and raised in Audubon and later lived in Deptford, died Sunday, June 22, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Navarro Regional Hospital in Corsicana, Texas, where she had moved 18 years ago. "She said she had watched her grandchildren here grow up," said daughter-in-law Kim Wells of Audubon. "Now she wanted to watch her grandchildren in Texas grow up. " A graduate of Audubon High School, she was a longtime member of the Audubon All-Girl Drum and Bugle Corps, known universally as the Bon-Bons, and of St. Rose of Lima Roman Catholic Church in Haddon Heights.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
When singer Kim Weston recalls the Uptown Theater, she remembers making a stunning entrance in a beautiful skintight gown that brought the crowd to a frenzy in the early 1960s. "I started singing behind the curtain," said Weston, who had hit records on the emerging Motown label. "When they finally opened up the curtains, somebody in the audience yelled, 'Oh my God, how much for the dress?' " Weston said. "That young man and I grew to be good friends. " Weston, who in 1966 recorded the iconic hit duet "It Takes Two" with Marvin Gaye and had solo records as well, was sharing her recollections Thursday with students in a Temple University class devoted to the historic Uptown and another class focused on Motown Records.
NEWS
October 29, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WELDON MCDOUGAL was a teenager when he and other boys who had formed a soul singing group decided to try out their music in an aunt's back yard. It was a Sunday afternoon and the aunt and a group of church ladies were having tea. The boys sang "Work With Me," a song on the R&B charts that some stations had refused to air because of its raunchy lyrics. "We couldn't have picked a worse number if we tried," McDougal told Bob Bosco, local writer and music historian, in an interview.
NEWS
April 10, 2005 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It will be a treat for Mary Wells to sleep past 5:30 a.m. Sleeping in is high on the list of priorities for when she retires as president and chief executive officer of Family Service on Jan. 6. Wells, 62, has been with the agency since its inception in the 1960s. Since 1978, she has led the organization, which serves about 12,000 people a year in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Cumberland and Monmouth Counties on a budget of about $26.5 million. Family Service provides counseling, foster care, group homes, crisis intervention and assistance to mental health clients, and other services.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Despite neighbors' concerns about a group home from which a resident fled before assaulting a 6-year-old girl, the Borough Council said Tuesday night that it had no control over such homes, which are protected by federal law. Duly Torres, 19, a resident of the Azure Lane Group Home for autistic teenagers, fled about 4:45 p.m. Sunday and entered two homes on Hawthorne Street, damaging furniture in the first and, in the second, grabbing a young...
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1968, Family Service of Burlington County was a fledgling counseling agency, and Mary Wells, a newly graduated social worker and a homemaker pregnant with her second child, was helping it to its feet. From her Moorestown living room, between vacuuming and spoon-feeding her son, just months old, the 25-year-old offered consolation by telephone to depressed teenagers and women suffering from domestic abuse. A 24-hour hotline was a new concept back then, Wells said, but because the service was needed, she volunteered to help.
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Marie Burns Wells, an Avon sales representative, died Sunday. She was 98 and lived in Yeadon and Lansdowne. Wells sold Avon products from 1965 until shortly before her death. She was named Avon's "Miss Personality" in 1988 and received the "Mrs. Albees," Avon's equivalent to the Oscar or Emmy. She was recognizable by her trademark hats and matching accessories. Her husband of 68 years, William Henry "Cherokee Bill" Wells, died last November. She became an "Avon Lady" when she retired in her late 60s from the catering business she started out of her home.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The supervisor of a Burlington County program for troubled young adults coerced one of his clients, a 19-year-old woman, into having sex with him by threatening to drop her from the program, authorities alleged yesterday. Oscar J. Brooks Jr., who is also assistant women's basketball coach at Rutgers University in Camden, was arrested yesterday morning and charged with sexually assaulting the woman, a second-degree offense that carries a maximum penalty of 10 years. Stephen G. Raymond, the Burlington County Prosecutor, said Brooks had gotten the woman to come to his apartment on Monday to have sex, and later threatened to kill her if she told anyone about it. Brooks, 30, of Maple Shade, was supervisor of Young Adults in Transition, a division of Family Service of Burlington County, from June 5 until yesterday, when he was fired after his arrest.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | By Andrea D'Asaro, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mary Wells said she let President Clinton have a piece of her mind during a visit to the White House in the summer. The President, fighting then to pass his budget, had invited her as part of a team of "opinion makers" from New Jersey to rally support. Wells, director of Family Service of Burlington County and a former Moorestown councilwoman, said that even as she backed Clinton's plans, she gave him some advice: Don't compromise. "I told him he should be willing to take the risk of being a one-term president by going with his conscience," said Wells, 51. Wells herself is not averse to taking on daunting tasks without flinching.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1993 | By Mark Marymont, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Rhythm and Blues Foundation is housed in a crowded room on the fourth floor of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, hardly funky digs for a group that promotes the gritty, soulful music of the '40s, '50s and '60s. "Hey, it's a great address. I hope we stay here forever," said foundation executive director Suzan E. Jenkins, leading the way down a long and winding hallway, past models of Army tanks and other military memorabilia, to her windowless office, where she works with her one full-time assistant.
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