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Mary Wilson

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Mary Wilson finally threw in the towel and officially severed her ties with the Supremes in 1977 - seven years after the departure of Diana Ross - it was probably the most traumatic moment in her life. "My heart was kind of broken," she said. "I realized that the biggest part of what would happen to me in my life was over. " Wilson, who will open for Joan Rivers this weekend at Caesars Hotel-Casino, has finally completed the adjustment, although she knows she cannot fully escape the shadow cast by the Supremes, the most successful girl group in pop music history.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
Hillary Clinton has been a part of national life for so long, known to haters and admirers alike by first name alone, that it was almost easy to overlook the monumental nature of her impending accomplishment. Not anymore. After voters Tuesday cemented her status as the first woman to clinch the presidential nomination of a major political party, millions of women reveled in Hillary's historic moment. They let their young daughters stay up late to watch on TV, felt a certain catch in their throat, and perhaps, like Clinton herself, wished their own mothers had been alive to witness it. "First time since 1789 - that's a long time," said Rita Conley, 75, a former Democratic committeewoman, who lives in North Wales, Montgomery County.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
FOR NEARLY half a century, the signature sequined gowns and other lavish stage costumes belonging to 1960s Motown superstars the Supremes lay forgotten, boxed up and stacked in founding member Mary Wilson's various garages and storage spaces. Many were in excellent shape, though some outfits were deteriorating and others had gone missing. In hindsight, it's jaw-dropping that nobody had bothered to catalog and preserve it all, a situation that's been remedied in "Come See About Me: The Mary Wilson Supremes Collection," opening Friday and continuing through July at the African American Museum in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
If I'm blessed to reach 56 years of age, I hope to be a better man than I am now, at 42. I hope to be more gracious, to have found some peace, hope not to be nursing ancient grudges. I hope, in other words, to be nothing like 56-year-old Diana Ross. Or, for that matter, her erstwhile fellow Supreme, the also-56 Mary Wilson. What was supposed to have been a triumphant tour reuniting the most successful American pop music group of the 1960s was canceled last week, a victim of microscopic ticket sales.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer The Washington Post, New York Daily News, New York Post and USA Today contributed to this report
Diana Ross, who will sing in Camden tomorrow night, did not drop by Washington, D.C.'s, Martin Luther King Jr. Library on her way to town. So she did not mingle with the members of the Supremes International Fan Club who met there last weekend. Mary Wilson was there. And she is still cranky. Wilson, pressing flesh and posing for photos with delighted fans, browsed through the library's current exhibit of Supremes memorabilia, which includes one of Wilson's old gowns. She reflected that other venues have been less welcoming to former Supremes . . . who are not Diana Ross.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | By A. D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
The air was sticky. Storm clouds rolled by so slowly they seemed to taunt the crowd below. It could have been a disaster inside the First Union Spectrum and out. But Wednesday night, Diana Ross had the last laugh on Mary Wilson and others who bet against her pulling off a credible Supremes "reunion. " Against all odds - the absence of Wilson and Cindy Birdsong, slow pre-show sales for $250 tickets, Wilson's televised griping - opening night of the "Return to Love" tour was a smashing success.
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Wilson, a housekeeper at Bryn Mawr College, would be the first to acknowledge that she doesn't always keep her mind on her job. That's because she is also a poet, and little things she sees while mopping and dusting - such as the model of a brain in a biology professor's office - often inspire her. "I go walking down the hall, and I'll be thinking about the right words," she said. "Then, when I go on break, I'll be scribbling it all down on a piece of paper. " College officials heard about her talent, and Denise Romano, director of housekeeping, asked her to write a poem about the new Ward Building, which houses the college's facilities services, housekeeping and purchasing departments.
LIVING
June 14, 2000 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Someday, we'll be together. But not tonight. When Diana Ross and the Supremes open their 30-city "Return to Love Tour" at the Spectrum this evening, it will be without Mary Wilson or Cindy Birdsong, Ross' Motown partners during the heady 1960s and '70s. And it may be without much of an audience. Yesterday, a pair of tickets - at $250 per - could be purchased through Ticketmaster.com in Row 6, at the foot of the stage. Have nine friends? Still not a problem. A block of 10 seats was available in Row 10, front and center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1986 | By SUE CUMMINGS, Los Angeles Daily News
Mary Wilson admits that at age 42, she is a little young to publish her memoirs. But there's quite a story packed into those years. "Dreamgirl: My Life as a Supreme" (St. Martin's Press, $16.95) tells about her experiences as one-third of Motown's most glamorous and successful singing group of the '60s. But Wilson, now pursuing a solo career, has hardly retired from show business. So why the rush to release her autobiography this month? The prologue of "Dreamgirl" holds a clue.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this article were United Press International, the Chicago Tribune, the New York Daily News and USA Today.)
Mary Wilson, a former singer with the Supremes, has accused the group's most prominent member, Diana Ross, of being "a spoiled brat" whose treatment of the other three singers contributed to the alcoholism and death of one. In her book, Dream Girl: My Life as a Supreme (due out in October), Wilson, 42, writes that after Motown records president Berry Gordy anointed Ross the Supremes' lead singer, "we were slowly put in the position of working for Diana - even to the point of having separate dressing rooms.
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NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
Hillary Clinton has been a part of national life for so long, known to haters and admirers alike by first name alone, that it was almost easy to overlook the monumental nature of her impending accomplishment. Not anymore. After voters Tuesday cemented her status as the first woman to clinch the presidential nomination of a major political party, millions of women reveled in Hillary's historic moment. They let their young daughters stay up late to watch on TV, felt a certain catch in their throat, and perhaps, like Clinton herself, wished their own mothers had been alive to witness it. "First time since 1789 - that's a long time," said Rita Conley, 75, a former Democratic committeewoman, who lives in North Wales, Montgomery County.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
FOR NEARLY half a century, the signature sequined gowns and other lavish stage costumes belonging to 1960s Motown superstars the Supremes lay forgotten, boxed up and stacked in founding member Mary Wilson's various garages and storage spaces. Many were in excellent shape, though some outfits were deteriorating and others had gone missing. In hindsight, it's jaw-dropping that nobody had bothered to catalog and preserve it all, a situation that's been remedied in "Come See About Me: The Mary Wilson Supremes Collection," opening Friday and continuing through July at the African American Museum in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Wilson, a housekeeper at Bryn Mawr College, would be the first to acknowledge that she doesn't always keep her mind on her job. That's because she is also a poet, and little things she sees while mopping and dusting - such as the model of a brain in a biology professor's office - often inspire her. "I go walking down the hall, and I'll be thinking about the right words," she said. "Then, when I go on break, I'll be scribbling it all down on a piece of paper. " College officials heard about her talent, and Denise Romano, director of housekeeping, asked her to write a poem about the new Ward Building, which houses the college's facilities services, housekeeping and purchasing departments.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
If I'm blessed to reach 56 years of age, I hope to be a better man than I am now, at 42. I hope to be more gracious, to have found some peace, hope not to be nursing ancient grudges. I hope, in other words, to be nothing like 56-year-old Diana Ross. Or, for that matter, her erstwhile fellow Supreme, the also-56 Mary Wilson. What was supposed to have been a triumphant tour reuniting the most successful American pop music group of the 1960s was canceled last week, a victim of microscopic ticket sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | By A. D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
The air was sticky. Storm clouds rolled by so slowly they seemed to taunt the crowd below. It could have been a disaster inside the First Union Spectrum and out. But Wednesday night, Diana Ross had the last laugh on Mary Wilson and others who bet against her pulling off a credible Supremes "reunion. " Against all odds - the absence of Wilson and Cindy Birdsong, slow pre-show sales for $250 tickets, Wilson's televised griping - opening night of the "Return to Love" tour was a smashing success.
LIVING
June 14, 2000 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Someday, we'll be together. But not tonight. When Diana Ross and the Supremes open their 30-city "Return to Love Tour" at the Spectrum this evening, it will be without Mary Wilson or Cindy Birdsong, Ross' Motown partners during the heady 1960s and '70s. And it may be without much of an audience. Yesterday, a pair of tickets - at $250 per - could be purchased through Ticketmaster.com in Row 6, at the foot of the stage. Have nine friends? Still not a problem. A block of 10 seats was available in Row 10, front and center.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Mary Wilson is probably feeling vindicated right about now. Things are not going as well as hoped for the much-hyped Diana Ross and the Supremes "Return to Love" concert tour. It has gotten reams of negative press, and ticket sales for the 26-city tour that kicks off tomorrow at the First Union Spectrum have been disappointing. Promoters here would not release sales figures, but box-office workers last week said they still had lots of tickets available, leading organizers, no doubt, to wonder: Baby, baby, where did the love for the Supremes go?
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Looking at them, you wouldn't guess they have much in common. Scherrie Payne is just 5-foot-2, radiantly beautiful and ladylike. Lynda Laurence is outspoken and sophisticated in a world-weary, been-there-done-that kind of way. What they share is that for brief periods during the 1970s, they got to live the fantasy of just about every American girl who grew up listening to Motown music. They were members of the legendary Supremes. Dressed in the group's trademark evening gowns and high-heeled shoes, they toured with Diana Ross, performing such classics as "Baby Love," "Where Did Our Love Go?"
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Teenagers may turn up their noses at the musical lineup, but their baby boomer parents may get ready to party. After all, these groups represent their past, not their children's. The Four Tops, Mary Wilson and the Supremes, and the Spinners - just names from history to many young music fans - will perform during Gov. Ridge's inaugural concert Monday night. The governor's musical taste, like his politics, covers a lot of bases. The 53-year-old from Erie says his favorite crooner is Frank Sinatra.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Michael J. "Mickey" Pisano, a doctor who never forgot that he was treating people and not health insurance ID numbers, died Friday after a long fight against cancer. He was 65 and lived Marlton, N.J. Pisano, a native of South Philadelphia and a previous resident of Cherry Hill, N.J., served the South Philadelphia community for more than 30 years. "As a doctor he was unique. He never lost sight that he was treating a person and not just an illness," said Celeste Pisano Sobieski, a daughter.
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