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NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Even in the unlikely event that federal subsidies for mass transit continue at their current levels, 35 of Pennsylvania's 41 public mass-transit systems will incur deficits by the end of the decade, according to a study released yesterday. In its study, the state Legislative Budget and Finance Committee said systems ranging in size from giant SEPTA, with an annual ridership of more than 366 million passengers, to the Borough of Pottstown, whose six buses serve about 300,000 riders, will finish fiscal 1990 in the red. The combined deficits of the 35 systems will total nearly $19 million, according to the report.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An attempt by two Philadelphia-area congressmen to restore $10.5 million in federal operating assistance to SEPTA, along with about $125 million in similar mass-transit subsidies around the country, was defeated last night by the House of Representatives. The effort came during floor debate on a massive transportation-funding bill, in the form of an amendment offered by U.S. Reps. Thomas M. Foglietta (D., Phila.) and Jon D. Fox (R., Montgomery County). It was defeated, 295-122.
NEWS
February 28, 2005
O NE WOULD THINK Republican legislators had run out of excuses for refusing to address Pennsylvania's mass-transit- funding mess. Especially after Gov. Rendell presented a $562 million, two-year plan last week that covered nearly all their concerns. GOP legislative leaders whined that they wouldn't consider a dedicated funding bill for mass transit unless it included money for roads, highways and bridges. They got it: $355 million by locking in on the recent automatic increase in the oil-based franchise tax, paid for by drivers at the gasoline pump, and increases in driver and vehicle fees.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | BY TED LEONARD
I agree with Joanne R. Denworth's assessment of the need to repair the state's highways and bridges (Guest Opinion, "Fix roads, but don't forget mass transit"), but I am concerned that she is also advocating that the state's motorists reach deeper into their pockets to fund mass transit systems most of them will never use. It may surprise many motorists to learn they already pay a great deal for mass transit. Motorists pay 18 cents federal tax at the gas pump, of which only 10 cents is used for highway maintenance.
NEWS
April 14, 1986 | By Tony Snow
It has now been 23 years since the federal government got into the urban mass transit business. During this period it has forked out more than $43 billion to metropolitan rail and bus lines. The result has been a colossal failure of social engineering and one of the most scandalous abuses of the taxpayer in our nation's history. Like so many projects by the federal government, subsidies for mass transit have failed to help their intended beneficiaries. Ridership on public transit has declined from 24 billion rides in 1947 to 9 billion in 1963 to 8 billion in 1985.
NEWS
August 29, 2011 | Staff Report
Mass transit operations in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey are slowly returning to normal, but lingering problems have caused some notable disruptions. SEPTA's subways, buses and trolleys are running again, but service has been suspended on the Cynwyd, Paoli/Thorndale, and Trenton Regional lines because of residual storm related problems. Service had been suspended on the Norristown line, but it was restored this afternoon. ( www.septa.org ) Amtrak trains are running between Philadelphia and Washington, but not between Philadelphia and Boston due to the extensive flooding, debris on tracks, and power problems as a result of Irene.
NEWS
March 5, 1996 | BY CLAUDIA CRANE
I was shocked and offended by Ted Leonard's complaint "Motorists subsidize mass transit" (Guest Opinion Jan. 5). Sure they do, and they should. All of us who drive foul the air and make noise, and some of us maim or kill other motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists and ourselves. Shouldn't those of us who cause problems pay for the solution? And shouldn't Ted Leonard be glad that some people, through choice or economic necessity, continue to use public transportation? If all the people who get to work by means other than by private car suddenly started driving to work, he'd be sitting in traffic jams all the time.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
The man picked by President Clinton to become the nation's top mass-transit official is a lifelong Philadelphian who grew up riding the Broad Street Subway and the Route 33 bus. State Rep. Gordon J. Linton, 45, a resident of West Mount Airy and an influential figure on transit issues in Pennsylvania for the past decade, was named this week to head the Federal Transit Administration in Washington, D.C. The post, still subject to confirmation by...
NEWS
April 9, 1990
Future mass transit battles will not pit city against suburban interests. The people who live or work in the 'burbs are finally feeling the pinch. Route 202 traffic jams, for example, sometimes make the Schuylkill look like the region's only real expressway. Everyone agrees improving mass transit must be a top priority. There is less unanimity on solutions. But that's OK. SEPTA's call for an additional $5 billion investment in mass transit over the next decade should promote extensive debate.
NEWS
December 7, 2004 | By W. WILSON GOODE JR
ON DEC. 2, the city's two representatives on the SEPTA board vetoed a decision to raise the base fare to $3 a ride, which would be the highest in the nation. Fortunately, the two city reps have veto power though they only have two of 15 seats on the board. Unfortunately, the same rules allow that veto to be overridden by the rest of the suburban-dominated board on Dec. 16. The veto power is only symbolic. The veto is symbolic of the fact that those two SEPTA board members are there to represent Philadelphia, which contributes the highest subsidy of the five counties served by the authority and the highest portion of the authority's fare revenue.
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NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like cartoon thought bubbles, a series of bold, red decals will be appearing on sidewalks around Philadelphia this week. City transit planners are hoping the decals will inspire passersby to think about - and give feedback on - the potential of the 85 tagged sites as station locations for the city's long-awaited bike-share system. The stickers, designed by Mural Arts Program artist Eurhi Jones, are part of a high-tech and, according to the city, unprecedented effort to incorporate public opinion in shaping the system, which will launch in May with 600 bikes and 60 docking stations over 8.28 square miles.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
When New Jersey Turnpike officials complete a massive widening project stretching from South Jersey to New Brunswick, there will be plenty of additional elbow room for motorists. In fact, the now heavily used expressway might get downright lonely at times. The same could be true of a new Delaware River bridge near Trenton, as well as additional interchanges on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. While the region's engineers once predicted substantial increases in traffic in coming years - for the Jersey artery, projections called for southbound traffic to nearly double in less than three decades - real-time reports show volumes are flat or even falling.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ridership on buses, trains, and subways in 2013 was the highest in 57 years, the American Public Transportation Association said Monday. The growth in transit ridership continued a 20-year trend attributed to higher gasoline prices, a shift by young adults away from automobiles, increased use of mobile technology, and the increasing allure of urban areas. "There is a fundamental shift going on in the way we move about our communities," said APTA president Michael Melaniphy. In 2013, riders made 10.7 billion trips on U.S. public transit systems, up 1.1 percent from 2012.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - By the time the fifth train from Secaucus rolled into MetLife Stadium with another thousand fans Sunday, both sides of this very Jersey Super Bowl were already defeated. By Secaucus. They slumped off the train silently, overheated, claustrophobic, transformed from upbeat football fans from out West into huddled masses of East Coast commuters, bitter and sarcastic about their long commute on NJ Transit. "Jersey sucks!" they had shouted in unison while stuck for 90 minutes in a Secaucus stairwell, some with only their Seattle Skittles to sustain them, dour demeanors in contrast to the bright sherbet colors of Bronco orange and Seahawk lime.
NEWS
December 13, 2013
(WITH APOLOGIES to Joyce Kilmer.) I THINK THAT I shall never like Anything as much as my bike. A bike that makes me feel so free, Because the laws don't apply to me. I go through lights of red, you've seen, It doesn't matter 'cause I'm green. Your sidewalks are made for me, And on them I park for free. At no stop signs do I halt. If you hit me - it's your fault. I'll ride forever, there's no doubt. (Or until 40, when knees give out.)
SPORTS
December 9, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Connor Barwin lives in the shadows of Philadelphia's skyline with a silhouette of Detroit's skyline etched on his right biceps. His Twitter profile lists two locations: "Detroit, Philadelphia. " The Detroit area is his hometown. Philadelphia is now his home. Barwin is not one who just passes through wherever he's living. The son of a city manager, Barwin yearns to be engaged with a sense of civic pride that is sometimes rare in such a transient industry. He played sports on both sides of 8 Mile Road while growing up around Detroit.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In a single afternoon, the state Senate on Wednesday did what the House had agonized over for months: approved a $2.3 billion transportation funding bill to repair aging highways and bridges, and bolster mass transit across the state. The vote cements a major victory for Gov. Corbett by delivering the biggest transportation spending plan in 15 years, one to address critical infrastructure needs while creating tens of thousands of jobs. "This legislation is key to the success of Pennsylvania and health and welfare of the region," said Sen. John Rafferty (R., Montgomery)
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - After months of debate, the state House failed to pass legislation Monday night that would have provided $2.3 billion to complete long-overdue repairs to the state's aging transportation infrastructure. In a stunning 103-98 vote that teetered between passage and defeat until the last moment of the roll call, lawmakers shot down an amendment to fix thousands of substandard bridges, repave hundreds of miles of crumbling roads, and pump hundreds of millions into modernizing mass transit systems across the state.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG After weeks of closed-door negotiations, Pennsylvania's legislative leaders agree on this much: If there is no vote by the middle of next week on a measure to provide billions of dollars in additional transportation funding, the bill is as good as dead. "You can go back to planning the funeral," Speaker Sam Smith (R., Jefferson) said this week when asked what would happen if the House did not consider the issue before it breaks Wednesday for the Thanksgiving holiday. Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi (R., Delaware)
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