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Mass Transit

NEWS
June 8, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Philip M. Ralston, 64, of Lower Make-field Township, a retired sales engineer and active supporter of mass transit, died Wednesday at Mercer Medical Center in Trenton. Mr. Ralston was born in New York City and grew up in Bucks County, where he graduated from the Solebury School in Solebury Township. Later, he studied at Trenton Junior College. He had lived in Lower Make-field for 37 years. Mr. Ralston was a dedicated and patient advocate for mass transit. He was a member of the transportation committee of the Lower Bucks County Chamber of Commerce and of the Delaware Valley Rail Passenger Association.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Wanda Motley and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania's financially struggling public transit agencies appear likely to get, for the first time in their history, an assured source of funding when the new state budget is finally adopted, transit and legislative leaders said yesterday. The biggest winner would be SEPTA, which would get 70 percent of the new money: about $140 million for much-needed rebuilding and repairs. As legislators and budget officials of Gov. Casey's administration continued to work out details of the new budget plan behind closed doors yesterday, the details of the mass-transit funding scheme remained sketchy.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | By BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writer
The top officer of the state Senate yesterday said he believes lawmakers should give priority to finding more money for mass transit operations, such as SEPTA, when they return to session next month. "I think it will be one of the priorities," Senate President Pro Tempore Robert Jubelirer said yesterday in a telephone interview. "I think it's something that we need to turn our attention to, among other things. " Jubelirer, a Blair County Republican, said he planned to consult with Thornburgh administration officials and members of his own Republican Party caucus in the Senate to determine what action, if any, to take on the mass transit issue when the Legislature returns Sept.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
When the average Joe Blow buys his state lottery ticket, he's probably dreaming of a new Caddy or a big-screen TV, not a free ride on the bus or low-cost prescriptions for an elderly neighbor. But the Pennsylvania State Lottery Commission reports that proceeds from the legalized betting venture provided nearly $130 million in the fiscal year ended last June 30 to help senior citizens in Philadelphia alone, not only with transit and medications but property tax and rent rebates and other services.
NEWS
June 11, 1991 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of mass transit riders could be eligible for a $15-per-month, tax-free subsidy to offset their cost of using public transportation under a program unveiled yesterday by local officials. Companies in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware are being asked to provide the subsidy to their employees under provisions of the 1984 Federal Deficit Reduction Act and the Tax Reform Act of 1986, which allow tax-free fringe benefits. Transportation executives and government officials behind the program, developed by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, describe it as a major new initiative to encourage the use of mass transit in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
January 24, 1991
It's easy to figure out this nation's priorities. Just look at where the bucks go. Take transportation, for example. Every time you hop on an airplane for a business or vacation trip, your Uncle Sam contributes about $20 toward the cost of the trip. But take a bus to work, and the feds kick in about 29 cents. This nation is so good at building airports and the highways needed to get to them, you almost never have traffic jams anymore at airports. Not so for the daily commuter trying to get into Philadelphia for work.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
Chester County workers and shoppers who would rather get there from here on mass transit will have more choices in the coming decade if recommendations in a new transportation study are carried out. Proposed for the near future are two new bus routes in Coatesville and Exton, more frequent bus and train service on existing lines, and better coordination of SEPTA and privately owned buses. On a more distant horizon, the recommendations would extend transit service within the county and add new bus routes between West Chester and Phoenixville, and Exton and Coatesville.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the coffee table in his office overlooking Chestnut Street, Eugene K. Skoropowski keeps a tattered 1938 issue of Life magazine. Inside is a four-page artist's rendering of what urban transportation would be like in the distant future - 1958. It shows cars, cars and more cars, all whizzing along wide turnpikes that deliver them right to the front doors of snazzy urban skyscrapers. "There you have it," said Skoropowski, "the future that never was. " Skoropowski, 43, is SEPTA's chief of planning and the primary author of the transit authority's "Vision of the Future.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer (Ernest Tollerson of The Inquirer Trenton Bureau contributed to this article.)
President Reagan's proposed 1987 budget would severely cripple area mass transportation systems, eliminating Amtrak service and forcing massive fare increases and reduced service on SEPTA lines, spokesmen for both transportation agencies said yesterday. "The effect would be disastrous," said Rick Wooten, assistant general manager for public affairs at SEPTA. "The impact would be so massive that you are talking about a combination of severe fare increases, service reductions and perhaps even the abandonment of physical facilities.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | By LEWIS F. GOULD JR
Since the last week of June, nearly a thousand patrons of the Chestnut Hill West Line have been negatively impacted by an engineering evaluation declaring the Cresheim Valley Bridge unsafe for commuter rail trafiic. The bridge, 104 years old, must be completely rebuilt at a projected cost of $18 million. While SEPTA waits for the Urban Mass Transportation Administration to accept its grant application in order to begin construction, commuters who live north of the bridge face the daily inconvenience of beginning their morning journey on a bus instead of their train.
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