CollectionsMassachusetts Law
IN THE NEWS

Massachusetts Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
A federal court ruling in Massachusetts has given encouragement to those in other states who advocate laws controlling health-care costs for the elderly. The U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals last week upheld a 1985 Massachusetts law that prohibits doctors from charging Medicare patients more than the fees set by Medicare. Medicare is a national health insurance plan for the elderly and the disabled. The penalties for violating the Massachusetts law include a reprimand and even loss of the doctor's license to practice.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | By Frank Davies, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Harking back to the era of the Boston Tea Party, a Massachusetts official urged the Supreme Court yesterday to let local governments use their buying power to punish repressive governments abroad. But business groups and the U.S. Justice Department argued against a 1996 Massachusetts law that barred the state from buying products or services from companies that do business with the military dictatorship of Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. That law, struck down by lower courts, is similar to dozens of state and local laws and ordinances, including 22 other bans on business with Myanmar.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | By Frank Davies, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Ruling that the federal government has broad discretion in international affairs and trade, the Supreme Court yesterday made it more difficult for states and localities to impose their own foreign policy against nations whose policies are in disfavor. The court threw out a 1996 Massachusetts law, duplicated by about 25 states and local governments, that severely limited state purchases from companies that do business with Myanmar, also known as Burma, whose regime has been accused of severe human-rights abuses.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By freeing Louise Woodward, Massachusetts Judge Hiller B. Zobel sent an unclear message in a case in which both he and a jury had found the young woman responsible for the death of 8-month-old Matthew Eappen. In neither his directed verdict nor his sentence reduction yesterday did he reconcile the seriousness of the crime with the lenience of the punishment. His 16-page opinion cites "the interests of justice" as compelling his decision. But Massachusetts law defines involuntary manslaughter and second-degree murder so similarly that legal experts say the two crimes are almost indistinguishable.
NEWS
March 11, 2009
GOP needs Specter Dick Polman (Currents, March 8) says it is "Time for Specter to join a new party. " I say, "No, no, no. " He is the only one who can lead the Republican Party out of its ugly depression. As a moderate, as a long-term senator, and as a heroic leader who can stand up to the unpatriotic pundits who call for Barack Obama to fail, no one else has the standing and courage to resurrect the GOP. Kevin Ferris, repeating what Rep. Paul Ryan and other GOP luminaries said at the Conservative Political Action Conference, filled in some details about their recommendations beyond just fighting for Republican principles and ideas, but none of them responded to the current desperate crisis.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
A MASSACHUSETTS law that says that "no person" may enter or remain in the 35-foot buffer zones established outside abortion clinics in the state has set off a controversial legal battle about the proper balance between the rights of speakers and the rights of those who must listen to them. Although several federal courts have upheld the law over the past few years, the Supreme Court has now agreed to review it. The high court should uphold it as well. The petitioners, including a grandmother in her 70s who stands outside abortion clinics hoping to talk to women on their way in, claim that the law is an impermissible infringement on their right to express their opinion.
NEWS
December 13, 2002 | By BRENDAN I. KOERNER
THE U.S. SUPREME COURT has agreed to hear Lawrence vs. Texas, a challenge to the Texas law that criminalizes sodomy. So what exactly is sodomy? The exact definition varies from state to state, but sodomy has been broadly defined as a sexual "crime against nature" - a phrase echoed by then-Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1986, when the Supreme Court upheld a Georgia anti-sodomy law in Bowers vs. Hardwick. In the United States, that language dates back to a 1697 Massachusetts law that forbade "the detestable and abominable sin of buggery [anal sex]
NEWS
November 21, 2013
IN HER column "A muzzle-bound society," Christine Flowers objects to a Massachusetts law that forces abortion protesters to stay 35 feet away from the entrances to abortion clinics as "preventing people from expressing unpopular opinions. " She further claims that punishing people who violate the statute is "fascist. " No one is being prevented from expressing an opinion on abortion. Keeping people who often shout and hurl insults only 35 feet away from frightened women who are going through a difficult ordeal is not unreasonable.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
And then there was one. Rick Santorum's announcement Tuesday that he was suspending his presidential campaign, coupled with Newt Gingrich's earlier decision to scale back his effort, has effectively wrapped up the Republican presidential nomination for Mitt Romney. Thus the outcome of Pennsylvania's April 24 presidential primary will be moot. Neither this state's voters, nor New Jersey's, whose primary isn't until June 5, will have a say in deciding the GOP nominee. While that is unfortunate, the outcome gives Republicans their best choice to run against President Obama in the fall.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | BY CAL THOMAS
The headquarters for Operation Rescue, the pro-life organization that has seen between 10,000 and 12,000 of its members arrested this year for trespassing on the grounds of abortion clinics, is located in an unobtrusive Atlanta suburb. Its landmarks are a Texaco station and a small "Space Available for Rent" sign. Behind an unmarked door, Juli Loesch runs an office of a dozen people, none of whom seem like radicals, but all sharing the intense commitment to a cause that has much historical precedent.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2013
A MASSACHUSETTS law that says that "no person" may enter or remain in the 35-foot buffer zones established outside abortion clinics in the state has set off a controversial legal battle about the proper balance between the rights of speakers and the rights of those who must listen to them. Although several federal courts have upheld the law over the past few years, the Supreme Court has now agreed to review it. The high court should uphold it as well. The petitioners, including a grandmother in her 70s who stands outside abortion clinics hoping to talk to women on their way in, claim that the law is an impermissible infringement on their right to express their opinion.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON One woman testified that her husband, dying of brain cancer, couldn't persuade a court to let him stop paying alimony to an ex-wife who had a job. Another said her husband went to jail because he was out of work and couldn't afford to pay his alimony. Alimony payers and spouses, claiming an unfair system had forced them into financial distress - and given former spouses incentive not to support themselves - told story after story last week before a panel of Assembly lawmakers at the Statehouse.
NEWS
November 21, 2013
IN HER column "A muzzle-bound society," Christine Flowers objects to a Massachusetts law that forces abortion protesters to stay 35 feet away from the entrances to abortion clinics as "preventing people from expressing unpopular opinions. " She further claims that punishing people who violate the statute is "fascist. " No one is being prevented from expressing an opinion on abortion. Keeping people who often shout and hurl insults only 35 feet away from frightened women who are going through a difficult ordeal is not unreasonable.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Following the lead of Massachusetts and a handful of other states, activists are pushing legislation that would dramatically revise New Jersey alimony laws. The proposal, which has bipartisan support, would end the concept of permanent alimony and set new limits on the size and duration of alimony awards. Modeled after a Massachusetts law that took effect last year, the measure also would permit former spouses to return to court to seek revision of alimony orders entered before any change was enacted.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON - A Massachusetts funeral director said yesterday he has received burial offers from out-of-state cemeteries for the body of a Boston Marathon bombing suspect who was killed in a gun battle with police, even as Tamerlan Tsarnaev's mother told him she wants the body returned to Russia. But Worcester funeral home director Peter Stefan said despite the request, he doesn't think Russia will take Tsarnaev's body and he is working on other arrangements. He declined to be more specific.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
Politicians have been lying since the dawn of the republic. Calling them out is an exercise in futility, roughly akin to handing out speeding tickets at the Indy 500. But, every so often, a lie is so shamelessly brazen that it behooves us to bemoan it. Witness the Republican talking point du jour, about how President Obama has supposedly slapped a humongous tax hike on the middle class, thanks to his health-reform provision that requires most...
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
And then there was one. Rick Santorum's announcement Tuesday that he was suspending his presidential campaign, coupled with Newt Gingrich's earlier decision to scale back his effort, has effectively wrapped up the Republican presidential nomination for Mitt Romney. Thus the outcome of Pennsylvania's April 24 presidential primary will be moot. Neither this state's voters, nor New Jersey's, whose primary isn't until June 5, will have a say in deciding the GOP nominee. While that is unfortunate, the outcome gives Republicans their best choice to run against President Obama in the fall.
NEWS
May 9, 2010
Frank Wilson is a retired Inquirer book editor who blogs at http://booksinq.blogspot.com Last month, the Government Accountability Office issued a report titled "United States Postal Service: Strategies and Options to Facilitate Progress Toward Financial Viability. " At present, as the report makes plain, the Postal Service is not economically viable, "due to USPS's inability to reduce costs sufficiently in response to continuing mail volume and revenue declines. " According to the report, mail volume has dropped 36 million pieces over the last three fiscal years, a 17 percent falloff, and during that time the Postal Service has lost $12 billion, despite reducing its workforce about 84,000 employees, as well as reducing capital expenditures and raising rates.
NEWS
March 11, 2009
GOP needs Specter Dick Polman (Currents, March 8) says it is "Time for Specter to join a new party. " I say, "No, no, no. " He is the only one who can lead the Republican Party out of its ugly depression. As a moderate, as a long-term senator, and as a heroic leader who can stand up to the unpatriotic pundits who call for Barack Obama to fail, no one else has the standing and courage to resurrect the GOP. Kevin Ferris, repeating what Rep. Paul Ryan and other GOP luminaries said at the Conservative Political Action Conference, filled in some details about their recommendations beyond just fighting for Republican principles and ideas, but none of them responded to the current desperate crisis.
NEWS
December 25, 2006 | By Eric Hazell
The holidays are a time for censuring Scrooges as well as celebrating Santas, and one group certain to get its share of criticism is Puritans. They just seem so different from us. Commentators often note that the group, which dominated the religious and political life of New England into the 18th century, "banned" or "despised" Christmas. It seems fitting that these sexually repressed, sanctimonious, witch-hunting bigots would frown on holiday cheer and inflict their priggishness on everyone else.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|