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Master Class

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When the Philadelphia Theatre Company agreed to produce Master Class early in 1995, Sara Garonzik, the company's producing director, knew the play would get a lot of attention and have a big future. Just how much attention the show would get and how big that future would be, Garonzik discovered Sunday night. She sat in the audience at the 50th Tony Award ceremony in New York as the production her company had premiered won three of theater's most prestigious awards - best play for author Terrence McNally, best actress for Zoe Caldwell, and best featured actress (the Tonys' phrase for supporting actress)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Misha Dichter sits down with Temple University piano students Sunday for an open master class, it will be with the knowledge that he might change someone's life. It was a master class, after all, that altered his forever. "It was 1964," recalled the New Yorker this week, "when Rosina Lhevinne came out to Los Angeles from New York to do a master class. I was studying with Aube Tzerko, an Artur Schnabel pupil, who was one of these Middle Europeans - you know, very German.
NEWS
February 21, 2002 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Master classes for opera singers traditionally have been ruled by those who can't do it anymore. Maria Callas, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, and other greats in the twilight of their careers have alternately inspired and terrified voice students who had the courage to present their best aria onstage and then be told in front of a sizable audience how far short of perfection they fell. At 43, Philadelphia mezzo-soprano Marietta Simpson, in contrast, is in the early-summer phase of her career, which may be why her Tuesday master class at her alma mater, Temple University, was fun, smart and sisterly.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Theater Critic
She did it all for love. In a nutshell, that's the irony, agony and ecstasy of opera legend Maria Callas' life, as brought to us by Terrence McNally's Tony Award-winning "Master Class. " Playing the Merriam Theater until Sunday, this national touring production features film star Faye Dunaway as the diva people loved to hate. "Master Class" is an engrossing portrait of a woman consumed by both her art and her search for love, vindication and personal validation. The device that McNally uses to reveal her emotional pain and professional sacrifice is a fictionalized Juilliard master class that Callas taught in the waning days of her career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
This week, when the Philadelphia Theatre Company begins the world-premiere run of Terrence McNally's new play, Master Class, the Plays & Players Theatre will be transformed into . . . a theater. Is it the theatrical setting for a world-famous but faded diva, about to coach young singers? Or is it an operating theater, where nerves, and even souls, are exposed by the knife of memory? That's an ambiguity that McNally will use to share his understanding of soprano Maria Callas, tumult and all, with his audience.
NEWS
May 19, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soon after meeting opera diva Marilyn Horne before his big performance, Justin D. Gonzalez told her to spare him nothing. "Tear me to shreds. Do me the honor," the 17-year-old Philadelphia high school senior invited before taking the stage Tuesday night at the Academy of Vocal Arts for his "master class" performance. "If I do, I'll do it with a velvet glove," promised the international star. She did, with comments that were exquisitely honest yet encouraging and uplifting.
NEWS
June 12, 1994 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
Jazz trombonist and composer Delfeayo Marsalis joined top high school musicians in the area for a jam session and jazz music lesson Friday at Abraham Lincoln High School in Northeast Philadelphia. About 125 music students from five high schools and 20 students from the All Philadelphia High School Jazz Ensemble were invited to take part in the master class. The event was sponsored by Bravo, the film and arts network, and Comcast Cable.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Dancers sweat and work hard to make what they do look easy. Having a pro like Maurice Hines in the studio to share his talents ought to go a long way to inspire aspiring performers like this group of advanced jazz dance students at The University of the Arts on South Broad Street, where Hines conducted a master class yesterday. Hines himself began hoofing at age 5. He's starring with Stephanie Mills in "Harlem Suite," a dance musical he choreographed and directs. The show goes on national tour after its final performance Sunday at the Shubert Theatre.
NEWS
February 8, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They referred to the renowned opera soprano Maria Callas as La Divina, and awarded her with curtain calls galore - at one point, 27. So as a moniker, La Divina is already taken. No problem. You can call Ann Crumb, simply, Divine. Crumb plays the opera singer in Media Theatre's production of Master Class, in a portrayal so deft, so remarkably considered, she must be channeling La Divina, who died in 1977. Crumb's every move is sensual and in character - each step across the Media stage, each sweep of her arms, each turn of her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Classical Guitar Society and Temple University are sponsoring the belated local debut of guitarist David Russell, a highly ranked international artist. Russell, 37, will give a concert tomorrow night and master class Sunday evening. Both events are recommended; Russell's instrumental voice has an uncommon beauty that belies his phenomenal technique, and his choice of repertoire is well considered. Tomorrow evening's program includes familiar J.S. Bach and John Dowland pieces along with works by the less frequently performed composers Jose Broca, Carlo Domeniconi and Jorge Morel.
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NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a boy at a Catholic school in the Bronx, Gerard P. O'Sullivan noticed the nuns were not amused - actually, they were horrified - by a classmate's poem about seeing a relative shoot "rats, rats, rats running down the street. " The nuns' reaction fascinated him, said O'Sullivan, now a professor of English and theology at Neumann University in Aston. That was the start of his mild lifelong obsession with the prolific, disease-carrying rodents - especially what he calls the Victorian era "cult of the rat," a time when some rat-catchers became extremely rich and even served royalty.
SPORTS
October 22, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
IN THE AFTERMATH of the controversial penalty call Saturday night that cost Notre Dame a victory over Florida State, Irish coach Brian Kelly said indignantly that "We don't coach illegal plays" and that "Florida State blew the coverage and got rewarded for it. " Whether you are with him or against him, the play in question raises another yellow flag that could doom the Irish's second chance at this bowl playoff thing. His players are terrible actors. All C.J. Prosise or Will Fuller had to do on that play was to pretend he was trying to catch the ball.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
BEIJING - The Philadelphia Orchestra's 2014 China Residency and Tour of Asia hit its stride Friday at the National Centre for the Performing Arts with a packed house that roared in response to a powerhouse performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 1 , clapping long and hard, and seeming doubly charmed when music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin turned to the audience and quietly said, "Xie xie" ("Thank you"). The Philadelphia players had gotten to know the hall's acoustics for a Mahler symphony that taps an orchestra to the max. One man confessed he was so moved that he had begun writing a rhapsodic letter to his fiancée to say how much he loved her. But while explaining this to Nézet-Séguin in the postconcert autograph line, he told the conductor, "I've also fallen in love with you!"
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
I SAW THE new Ralph Steadman documentary with a Pulitzer-winning cartoonist in tow, the better to understand this look at the famous illustrator. She described the movie, "For No Good Reason," as a fascinating master class in methods and techniques of Steadman, known for his Rolling Stone art and his famous collaborations with Hunter S. Thompson. But she had a question: Who is that ragged numbskull who's always standing next to Steadman? Why, it's Johnny Depp, who in point of fact does not add much to the documentary.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Well, no wonder Johnnie Hobbs Jr. taught acting at the University of the Arts for 30 years: His performance, in the Walnut Independence Studio's production of Driving Miss Daisy as the African American chauffeur, Hoke, is a master class in how to do it. Alfred Uhry's much-loved play is familiar both from many, many stage productions and from the luminous movie starring Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman, so it is a particular challenge to bring...
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
'I hate when they call me the 'Grandmother of French New Wave Cinema,' or 'the only woman along with Godard, Truffaut, and the rest,' " Agnès Varda declares with a dismissive flick of her wrist. "I started earlier," notes the irrepressible octogenarian ("85 in May," she prompts), sipping Earl Grey while admiring the play of light on rooftops outside the picture window of the Inn at Penn. Indeed, Varda - artist in residence this week at the University of Pennsylvania, where she will speak to students, show her films, and teach a master class - made La Pointe-Courte , her debut feature, in 1954.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
YouTube, Hulu, Microsoft - everybody wants to get into the content game by offering TV-style entertainment. Even Amazon recently announced it will adapt the film Zombieland into a serial you will be able to stream on Amazon Prime. With its first foray into original production, Netflix hits the bull's-eye resoundingly. House of Cards is a fascinating, first-class political thriller starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright. All 13 episodes of the first season will be available Friday for streaming to service subscribers.
SPORTS
August 7, 2012 | Associated Press
LONDON - Chinese super heavyweight Zhou Lulu shouts "relax" to calm her nerves. Iran's Saeid Mohammadpour hisses like a snake. The variety of grunts and screams that weightlifters let out before their battle with gravity isn't just for show. It's to "let the weights know you're coming" in the mental buildup before a big lift, said Joe Micela, coach of U.S. weightlifter Sarah Robles. "We call it a trigger point," Micela said. "Letting out that yell, is preparing my mind and my body to go do this thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dick Clark, who died Wednesday at 82 of a heart attack, has been cremated, rep Paul Shefrin tells USA Today. Entertainment Tonight reports the ashes will be scattered in the Pacific Ocean, but Shefrin says Clark's family had not yet decided what to do with them. Plans for a public memorial hadn't been finalized. Simon Cowell: Not gay Simon Cowell, whose sexuality has been the subject of not a few gossip items, tells biographer Tom Bower in a new book he is straight.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
There's a Bruce Springsteen quote on the wall of the National Constitution Center, currently housing an exhibit called "From Asbury Park to the Promised Land. " It reads: "The American idea is a beautiful idea. It needs to be preserved, served, protected and sung out. Sung out. " Four miles south at the Wells Fargo Center on Wednesday night, Springsteen went to work, putting enthusiastic emphasis on those final words. The nearly three-hour show was - remarkably, considering the gravity of the State of the Union subject matter on his defiant new album Wrecking Ball, and the fact that the guy is now 62 years old - every bit the ecstatic revival meeting and master class in rock-and-soul catharsis that Springsteen's ardent fans have come to expect over the course of a 40-year career.
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