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Master Class

ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2000 | By Charles Huckabee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An internationally respected pianist and vocal coach for three decades, Dalton Baldwin has collaborated with some of the world's finest singers, Jessye Norman, Elly Ameling, Jose Van Dam and Gerard Souzay among them. A faculty member of Westminster Choir College in Princeton, and regular master class teacher all over, he also works with young voices still preparing or just beginning careers. Over the last year, Baldwin has met several times with three young singers under the sponsorship of Astral Artistic Services: soprano Indra Thomas, mezzo-soprano Jennifer Arnold and baritone Eric Owens.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
She enters the play from below the stage apron, wearing a black cloak and walking deliberately upstage into the swirling action as a three-woman, Greek-style chorus sings, "Before the morning, you have a story to be told. . . . I will be a witness. " Her back is to you, yet you can't keep your eyes off her, which has partly to do with how the scene is directed but more to do with her stoic, dignified carriage, how she commands the stage simply by inhabiting it. Marie Christine, the musical/opera (take your pick)
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During his debut performance with the Metropolitan Opera in 1965, Sherrill Milnes recalls, he almost made a horrible mistake. He miscalculated on a downbeat and ran out of breath. He struggled to finish his phrase. "I pushed it out, but inside I died," the renowned baritone said earlier this week during a visit to the International School of Performing Arts at Delaware Valley College, in Doylestown. "It took all my courage not to stop and say, 'I'm sorry, folks. I can't do this.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a professional disappointment that led, at least in part, to pianist Joyce DiCamillo's present emphasis on teaching. Four years ago, DiCamillo and her trio had been working at a club in a great location in New York: right across from Lincoln Center. "It was a steady job, and we had been there for about a year," DiCamillo said. "But one day, without notice, they turned it into a cigar club. " That was the end of that job. So the trio decided to concentrate on other things.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Pianist Orrin Evans left Rutgers University in 1994 when he figured he could make money playing music. On Wednesday, he returned to Rutgers - to lead a master class of aspiring musicians. "It was a pleasure," Evans said. "They picked a dropout to come down and talk to them. " While he may have dropped out of Rutgers, Evans has picked up gigs and a reputation as a respected sideman for drummer Ralph Peterson, saxophonist Bobby Watson and as musical director for Philadelphia-based singer Denise King.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"Good singing is good singing. But there are stylistic considerations that are tremendously important in musical theater," as opposed to opera, says Art Frank, a professor emeritus at Temple University's Esther Boyer School of Music. Sunday afternoon the public is invited to gain a greater appreciation of the American musical style by watching and listening to professional singers in a master class and workshop led by Frank and Temple professor and pianist John Johnson. As Frank points out, "In opera if you sing bel canto style - forming beautiful consonants that can get you by. When you're singing in English for English-speaking audiences, we have a whole different problem of delivery.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The top three albums on the classical chart all belong to superstar Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli. His first, pop-oriented album "Viaggio Italiano" was followed by "Time to Say Goodbye" with Sarah Brightman, titled after an enormous European hit, both selling more than 14 million copies worldwide. Nudging past them is his most recent Philips disc, "Aria," a collection of favorite operatic arias in that lustrous, expressive tenor applauded even by Luciano Pavarotti. Backed by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra under Steven Mercurio on this first American tour, Bocelli will appear at 8 p.m. Tuesday in the CoreStates Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats. The performance will begin in three minutes. " "Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats. The performance will begin in two minutes. " "Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats. The performance will begin in one minute. " And so you dutifully file into the auditorium, only to wait five or six minutes more. You may be in London, but you're still in the theater, where two things are certain: Five percent of the audience will be late, and the person seated in front of you will be taller than you are. Still, there's something thrillingly anticipatory about that silken, usually female, voice delivering its implacable countdown in playhouse after playhouse.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Theater Critic
She did it all for love. In a nutshell, that's the irony, agony and ecstasy of opera legend Maria Callas' life, as brought to us by Terrence McNally's Tony Award-winning "Master Class. " Playing the Merriam Theater until Sunday, this national touring production features film star Faye Dunaway as the diva people loved to hate. "Master Class" is an engrossing portrait of a woman consumed by both her art and her search for love, vindication and personal validation. The device that McNally uses to reveal her emotional pain and professional sacrifice is a fictionalized Juilliard master class that Callas taught in the waning days of her career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1997 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In Master Class, Terrence McNally's masterful play about opera singer Maria Callas, the famous diva says: "Art is domination. It's making people think that for that precise moment in time there is only one way, one voice. " In the touring version of Master Class, playing through Sunday at the Merriam Theater, Faye Dunaway has a particularly difficult task of convincing the audience that hers is the only way of playing Maria Callas. Before going on to Broadway, Master Class premiered in 1995, at the Philadelphia Theatre Company; in Philadelphia, Dunaway has to contend with the memory of the performance of Zoe Caldwell, who won both a local Barrymore and a Tony Award for her portrayal of Callas.
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