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NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Gus Ostrum, Special to The Inquirer
If one ball club has been puzzling to Delco Christian's basketball team this season, it has been Keystone Conference rival Cedar Grove Academy. On Tuesday, the visiting Titans dumped playoff-bound Delco for the second time this season, 62-56, in a game. This time Cedar Grove (3-8 in the league, 8-12 overall) - which won the first meeting, 60-57 - used excellent offensive balance in claiming the victory. Senior guard Dan Curbison led the effort with 17 points, and teammates Reggie Parks (16 points)
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mastery Charter School Shoemaker Campus called forward 86 students at its Thursday commencement ceremony at Temple University as Khalilah Harris, the keynote speaker, urged the seniors to make names for themselves. The Class of 2015 is "an unnamed generation blessed with the opportunity to claim their names and how they will be labeled," said Harris, deputy director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans. After honoring the victims of the Charleston, S.C., church shooting with a moment of silence, Harris spoke to a predominantly African American audience of graduates, friends, and family about the importance of avoiding labels and creating one's own success.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nick Lowe is laying his heart on the line. The veteran British pub-rocker, new-wave hit maker and producer has always been a superb song craftsman and master ironist, armed with a wicked wit and irresistible hooks. But this time, without getting too serious, he's singing it like he means it. Lowe's new sincerity was in evidence at the sold out Theatre of Living Arts on South Street on Saturday night. Early on, he pleaded earnestly on "Lover Don't Go," his heartfelt vocal warmed by Geraint Watkins' surging soul organ; for the first encore, he sang the gorgeous "Shelley My Love" solo, his naked devotion unadorned.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adrienne Nastasi has made a stop on her way to her senior year at Bristol Borough High: summer school. "I fell behind," Nastasi said. "It was my mistake. I should have come in after school and done the work. If I had, I wouldn't be here now. " It's not that Nastasi flunked applied chemistry. She got an incomplete, and that notation will stay on her record until she turns in missed work and scores 80 or better on makeup tests. At Bristol High, teachers have raised the standard.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Martha Woodall and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amid intense pressure from all sides, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission voted Wednesday night to approve five new charter schools from among the 39 applications at the end of an often tumultuous evening. The successful applicants were offered three-year charters with a long list of conditions. SRC Chairman Bill Green said the charter operators and the commission have until May 31 to agree on terms. The approved plans came from existing nonprofits that have operated successful charter schools in the city for years: KIPP, Mastery, Freire, Independence, and MaST.
NEWS
January 16, 2016
By Jacob Vigdor and Josh McGee The school wars never seem to end in Philadelphia. Superintendent William R. Hite Jr.'s recently announced intention to close several schools and convert them into charters has met opposition. One might be tempted to conclude that providing outstanding public education is impossible in this climate, but there are beacons of excellence. According to a new school rating system we've developed - found at SchoolGrades.org - half the elementary and middle schools in Philadelphia receive an F grade, putting them on par with the average performance of schools in countries at the bottom of international education rankings, like Serbia and Thailand, and well below the national average.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | JERRY T. JORDAN
ONE OF the reasons I fight so hard for traditional public schools is simply that I believe in what they can be. I believe in their potential, just like I believe in the potential of every single student that walks through the doors each morning. And why do I believe? It's personal: I'm a proud graduate of Philadelphia's neighborhood schools. As an African-American male and a lifelong Philadelphia resident, my success was not because I "picked myself up by my bootstraps. " My schools were places of learning.
NEWS
March 12, 2009 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The two most successful charter operators in Philadelphia - Mastery and KIPP - want to expand and hope to be part of Superintendent Arlene Ackerman's plans to change the district. Mastery's chief executive officer, Scott Gordon, called Ackerman's Imagine 2014 draft calling for converting more troubled district schools into charters "a breakthrough opportunity. " The proposal is so promising, he said, that Mastery had halted talks with school officials in Washington, Baltimore, New York, and elsewhere.
NEWS
September 26, 2012
By Scott Gordon In 2010, the School District of Philadelphia announced its Renaissance charter initiative, a bold plan to turn around persistently low-performing schools. The district empowered a number of parent groups to select charter providers for their failing neighborhood schools. Three of those parent groups chose Mastery. The student achievement results from those schools are now in. In just two years, PSSA scores in math soared an average 26 percentage points and reading scores climbed 17 percentage points.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A statewide grassroots education group, frequently and oftentimes fiercely critical of the state's charter school laws, is questioning whether Camden's process of bringing two more Renaissance schools to the city violated state statute. On Monday, Save Our Schools, founded in 2010, sent a letter to Commissioner David C. Hespe at the Department of Education raising concerns over promotional materials sent home with students last week detailing Mastery and Uncommon Schools. The letter to the commissioner also took issue with the district's application of the Urban Hope Act, which created district-hybrid schools.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | JERRY T. JORDAN
ONE OF the reasons I fight so hard for traditional public schools is simply that I believe in what they can be. I believe in their potential, just like I believe in the potential of every single student that walks through the doors each morning. And why do I believe? It's personal: I'm a proud graduate of Philadelphia's neighborhood schools. As an African-American male and a lifelong Philadelphia resident, my success was not because I "picked myself up by my bootstraps. " My schools were places of learning.
NEWS
January 16, 2016
By Jacob Vigdor and Josh McGee The school wars never seem to end in Philadelphia. Superintendent William R. Hite Jr.'s recently announced intention to close several schools and convert them into charters has met opposition. One might be tempted to conclude that providing outstanding public education is impossible in this climate, but there are beacons of excellence. According to a new school rating system we've developed - found at SchoolGrades.org - half the elementary and middle schools in Philadelphia receive an F grade, putting them on par with the average performance of schools in countries at the bottom of international education rankings, like Serbia and Thailand, and well below the national average.
SPORTS
November 7, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fels junior running back Jahmir Bohannon might be cursed. The 5-foot-10, 155-pounder is almost as fast as they come, but he has a penchant for getting caught from behind just short of the end zone. Bohannon was caught inside the 5-yard line twice Thursday in Fels' 26-14 nonleague victory against Mastery Charter North at the South Philadelphia Super Site. After he was caught at the 2-yard line in the fourth quarter, Fels coach Bill Harrigan bellowed from the sideline. "That's two or three you owe me now!"
SPORTS
October 24, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boys' Latin's Javon Oglesby-Rice was flat on his face on the grass at West Philadelphia with the football at least 35 yards away. It wasn't exactly the most athletic pose a player could strike on a football field, and one of his coaches couldn't help but give him a ribbing. "I thought you were an athlete," Warriors assistant Mario Dattilo joked. Oglesby-Rice had tripped and fallen en route to attempting another punt block. The Boys' Latin players were all smiles Thursday night after they came from behind to defeat Mastery North, 22-13, and earn their first Public League AAA victory this season.
SPORTS
August 28, 2015 | BY SAM DONNELLON, Daily News Staff Writer donnels@phillynews.com
BEFORE LAST night's game with the Mets, Phillies manager Pete Mackanin was asked what he anticipated from his newly acquired starting pitcher, Jerad Eickhoff, making only his second major league start after coming over in the Cole Hamels trade. "I'd like to see the same thing he did in Miami," said the manager. "Pound the strike zone, use all his pitches, throw all his pitches for strikes, keep the ball down. Today we're going to find out if he can repeat that. "Everybody has bad starts.
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mastery Charter Schools has been awarded $1.5 million from the Philadelphia School Partnership to help it turn around the Frederick Douglass Charter School in North Philadelphia. The grant from the partnership's Great Schools Fund was scheduled to be announced Wednesday - the first day of school for students at Douglass and at Mastery's 14 other campuses across the city. "We're delighted to have the support of the Philadelphia School Partnership and to get the resources we need to provide the best quality education for the children at Frederick Douglass," said Scott Gordon, CEO of the nonprofit Mastery Schools.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mastery Charter School Shoemaker Campus called forward 86 students at its Thursday commencement ceremony at Temple University as Khalilah Harris, the keynote speaker, urged the seniors to make names for themselves. The Class of 2015 is "an unnamed generation blessed with the opportunity to claim their names and how they will be labeled," said Harris, deputy director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans. After honoring the victims of the Charleston, S.C., church shooting with a moment of silence, Harris spoke to a predominantly African American audience of graduates, friends, and family about the importance of avoiding labels and creating one's own success.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SENIOR Alexa Moore remembers when, as an underclassman, she'd watch Mastery Charter School seniors cheer on the next chapters in their lives, college, military service or trade schools. "When you're up there watching, you kind of get bored because you're not the person that's celebrating," said Moore, 18, who will soon graduate from Mastery Charter School/Lenfest Campus. Yesterday it was her turn and that of about 564 other Mastery seniors to embrace their new chapters at the annual Mastery College Signing Day held at Temple University's Liacouras Center.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mastery Charter Schools is poised to take over another former Philadelphia district school. The School Reform Commission is scheduled to vote Thursday on whether Scholar Academies can hand over management of the Frederick Douglass School in North Philadelphia to Mastery. The district's charter school office will recommend the change beginning with the 2015-16 academic year. Scholar Academies asked Mastery to consider managing the school a little more than two weeks ago after the district's charter office said it would not recommend renewing the school's operating agreement because Scholar Academies had not delivered the academic improvement it had promised five years ago. Douglass, a former district elementary school at 2118 W. Norris St., was among the first low-performing district schools converted to Renaissance charters under the academic-turnaround program developed by then-Superintendent Arlene C. Ackerman.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE SCHOOL Reform Commission last night approved the opening of a new KIPP charter school and transferred management of a failing charter to Mastery. KIPP West Philadelphia, which was one of 34 charter applications denied in February, submitted a revised application last month to address concerns about governance, qualifications of staff and the proposed opening date. The SRC voted 3-1 to grant it a three-year charter for grades K-4, beginning in 2016. The school was approved for 200 students in the first year and may enroll up to 375 by 2018-19.
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