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NEWS
June 29, 2001
The United States recently donated $200 million to a United Nations consortium dedicated to arresting and reversing the course of the AIDS epidemic. Pathetic. Here we are, the richest, most powerful nation on earth, and we hand over a measly $200, when it's estimated that $7 to $10 billion will be needed annually. Let's do the math: 36 million people worldwide infected with AIDS, $200 million . . . that comes to about $5.56 per person. We should be ashamed of ourselves as a nation for offering so little help.
NEWS
January 3, 2005 | By Arthur Michelson
American middle school students don't much care that they're worse at math than their counterparts in Hong Kong and Finland. "I don't need it," my students say. "I'm gonna be a basketball star. " Or a beautician, or a car mechanic, or a singer. It's also hard to get much of a rise out of adults over the fact, released last year, that the United States ranked 28th out of 41 countries whose middle school students' math skills were tested by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The percentage of third, fifth and eighth graders in the Abington School District who needed remedial education in mathematics was higher last year than in the previous year, according to results of the state's basic-skills test. Reading in all three grades improved, as the percentage of Abington students who needed remedial help in that area was down. Although the percentage of third graders who needed remedial help in math increased only slightly, the amount of fifth graders who needed remedial education almost doubled from 8.6 percent in 1986-87 to 15.6 percent last year, according to the results of the Test of Essential Learning Skills (TELS)
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Lester, 9, is active and in good health. He rides a bike, swims at an indoor pool, and likes practicing his strokes in the ocean. He plays soccer at a local park, climbs the gym bars and goes on swings and slides. He also likes playing catch, going to church, and challenging others in a game of Scrabble or checkers. He is learning to play the flute. Though there is neglect and abuse in his background, Lester is a happy and well-adjusted boy. When a child in his foster home is feeling low, Lester will say, "Let's go draw" or offer to play catch.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Alonte, 12, is waiting to be adopted. His wish is to have an older brother who will show him how to do things. And he'd like a mother and father who would come to watch his team play basketball. Alonte receives therapy for the abuse and neglect in his background. He will continue to need counseling after adoption, and his entire family will be asked to be supportive and involved. He's in fifth grade and gets help with reading. He likes math, science, gym and recess best. One of his hobbies is drawing.
NEWS
December 16, 2004 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
So it turns out that American high school students do much worse in math than their peers in Hong Kong and South Korea. But the American kids think they're doing very well, thank you, while the Hong Kong and Korean students say they still have a long way to go. What's up with that? The discrepancy has many causes, to be sure, but at least part of the blame lies with our schools. We tell our kids that they're wonderful, over and over again, until they actually believe it. In other words, we lie. According to a 40-nation study of high-school math skills released last week by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Hong Kong and Korea rank first and third in the world, respectively, while the United States is 28th.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | by Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
The seventh-graders at Clara Barton Elementary School suffered through 13 different math teachers this school year because the School District did not want to spend the money to hire a full-timer, a teachers union leader charged yesterday. In a story in yesterday's Daily News, district officials said the procession of substitutes forced on the pupils could not be stemmed because of the provision in the teachers' labor contract that prohibits schools from hiring permanent replacements for teachers on sick leave.
NEWS
July 1, 2008 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
FOR A SIXTH straight year under state control, Philadelphia School District students posted impressive gains on the state's reading and math exams, city school officials announced yesterday. The gains cut across all racial lines and include students with disabilities, those learning English and those identified as economically disadvantaged. Still, the latest results of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) revealed the continuation of another pattern - a significant achievement gap that has Asian and white students outperforming their African-American and Hispanic peers.
NEWS
July 31, 2001
You make arrangements with Philadelphia Gas Works and they let you know what amount you must pay to get your bill down. You make payments every month, but instead of your bill going down, it goes up. Now you are paying much more. What type of arithmetic are they using? Someone needs to get on the ball before winter or we'll see some frozen people. Lula Jones, Philadelphia Nothing funny about Ira I applaud the efforts of the Maddux family and others in bringing Ira Einhorn to justice.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
L. Stanley Crane, chairman and chief executive officer of Conrail, has given a persuasive update on reasons why Congress should keep the railroad independent and not sell it to Norfolk Southern Corp. Testifying in Washington Wednesday before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, he presented the basic arithmetic to dramatize that the proposed sale actually would be a giveaway. Conrail has $939 million in cash and $360 million in overfunded pension assets for a total of about $1.3 billion.
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NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
BACK AROUND 2010, the Philadelphia School District's expectations of its schools to perform well on state standardized tests were "intense" and "unrealistic," according to two former administrators. They had been principals of two district schools - Communications Technology High School in Eastwick and Edward W. Bok Technical High School in South Philadelphia - when each grabbed pencils to change their students' answers, from wrong to right, on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment exams, according to two grand-jury presentments.
SPORTS
September 12, 2014 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
AND THE award for the top pitcher in the Phillies' minor league system goes to . . . . . . A 27-year-old reliever with 30 career big-league appearances under his belt who was pitching in the independent leagues two years ago. That's not an indictment of Luis Garcia, who had an excellent season as the closer at Triple A Lehigh Valley, where he saved 22 games and allowed just five earned runs while striking out 52 and walking 16 in 46 2/3innings (that's...
SPORTS
August 29, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE NFL wants teachers to use fantasy football to educate young students, according to a recent report. The knee-jerk reaction, of course, is to scoff at what is surely a marketing ploy. But upon further review, the idea has merit. Mark Waller, the chief marketing officer of the NFL, told the Wall Street Journal that the league is interested in helping improving students' math skills. "It's a complex game, fantasy," said Waller. "You should be able to learn a lot, particularly around math.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan McHugh-Ringiewicz walked into the dorm room and sized it up: Three beds. Three desks. Three chairs. Two closets. Three girls. "And a lot of stuff," said the respiratory therapist from West Chester, who was moving her daughter, Kerry, into the University of Delaware on Saturday. Would everything fit? "We're still trying to figure that out," she said. With larger-than-expected freshmen classes, the University of Delaware in Newark and Rowan University in Glassboro are requiring more students than ever before to triple up in dorm rooms designed for two. That can make for a tight squeeze - and some parents and students are less than thrilled.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
THREE WEEKS after Rais M'Bolhi was brought in to be the Union's goalkeeper of the future, we still await the Major League Soccer debut of the two-time World Cup participant. That day could still be several weeks away, meaning Zac MacMath is likely to garner a few more starts in goal over the final 10 games of this regular season. The Union (6-6-9) prepared this week as if MacMath would start Sunday's 8 p.m. home game against Chris Wondolowski and the San Jose Earthquakes (6-9-7).
SPORTS
August 6, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union goalie Zac MacMath has started every game for the last two years, but his role soon will change. When the Union signed two-time Algerian World Cup goalie Rais Mbohli last week, interim manager Jim Curtin said that the 28-year-old keeper would be the starter as soon as he was in game shape. Mbohli didn't make the trip to Kansas City for Friday's 1-1 draw. It's possible he could get his first start in the Union's next Major League Soccer game, Saturday against the Montreal Impact at PPL Park in Chester.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A teacher at KIPP Philadelphia Elementary Academy has won a national teaching award. Dayna Perry was one of 10 teachers nationwide whom the KIPP Foundation honored for excellence in teaching Friday night in Houston during the annual conference of the national charter school network. Winners were selected based on their track records in improving student performance, commitment to helping students succeed, and leadership in the classroom and their schools. Each will receive $10,000.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A city teacher has surrendered his teaching license in connection with a test-cheating probe. Radovan Bratic, formerly a math teacher at the Military Academy at Elverson, gave up his credentials, state officials reported this week. Bratic, 52, surrendered his license over allegations that he "violated the integrity and security of the PSSA by engaging in multiple PSSA testing administration violations over the course of multiple years," according to the state Department of Education.
SPORTS
June 20, 2014 | By Christian Hetrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Geiger served as the referee of a marquee World Cup matchup Wednesday as Chile defeated Spain, 2-0, in Rio de Janeiro. Before Geiger was selected to officiate on soccer's biggest stage, the resident of Beachwood, Ocean County, excelled in something else entirely. Geiger was an award-winning math teacher. An instructor at Lacey Township High School, Geiger won a Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching in 2009. He taught at all levels, from basic skills classes to Advanced Placement courses.
SPORTS
May 31, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 20th annual All City Classic, featuring the area's top high school boys' basketball talent, will tip off at 6:30 Friday night at Girard College. The showcase includes three games, organized by grade. The junior game will feature Archbishop Carroll's Derrick Jones and the Math, Civics and Sciences duo of Samir Doughty and Mike Watkins. Jones, a 6-foot-6 forward, averaged 16 points last season. The athletic dunker has scholarship offers from Arizona, Kansas, Kentucky, and others.
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