CollectionsMath
IN THE NEWS

Math

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 29, 2001
The United States recently donated $200 million to a United Nations consortium dedicated to arresting and reversing the course of the AIDS epidemic. Pathetic. Here we are, the richest, most powerful nation on earth, and we hand over a measly $200, when it's estimated that $7 to $10 billion will be needed annually. Let's do the math: 36 million people worldwide infected with AIDS, $200 million . . . that comes to about $5.56 per person. We should be ashamed of ourselves as a nation for offering so little help.
NEWS
January 3, 2005 | By Arthur Michelson
American middle school students don't much care that they're worse at math than their counterparts in Hong Kong and Finland. "I don't need it," my students say. "I'm gonna be a basketball star. " Or a beautician, or a car mechanic, or a singer. It's also hard to get much of a rise out of adults over the fact, released last year, that the United States ranked 28th out of 41 countries whose middle school students' math skills were tested by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The percentage of third, fifth and eighth graders in the Abington School District who needed remedial education in mathematics was higher last year than in the previous year, according to results of the state's basic-skills test. Reading in all three grades improved, as the percentage of Abington students who needed remedial help in that area was down. Although the percentage of third graders who needed remedial help in math increased only slightly, the amount of fifth graders who needed remedial education almost doubled from 8.6 percent in 1986-87 to 15.6 percent last year, according to the results of the Test of Essential Learning Skills (TELS)
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Lester, 9, is active and in good health. He rides a bike, swims at an indoor pool, and likes practicing his strokes in the ocean. He plays soccer at a local park, climbs the gym bars and goes on swings and slides. He also likes playing catch, going to church, and challenging others in a game of Scrabble or checkers. He is learning to play the flute. Though there is neglect and abuse in his background, Lester is a happy and well-adjusted boy. When a child in his foster home is feeling low, Lester will say, "Let's go draw" or offer to play catch.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Alonte, 12, is waiting to be adopted. His wish is to have an older brother who will show him how to do things. And he'd like a mother and father who would come to watch his team play basketball. Alonte receives therapy for the abuse and neglect in his background. He will continue to need counseling after adoption, and his entire family will be asked to be supportive and involved. He's in fifth grade and gets help with reading. He likes math, science, gym and recess best. One of his hobbies is drawing.
NEWS
July 1, 2008 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
FOR A SIXTH straight year under state control, Philadelphia School District students posted impressive gains on the state's reading and math exams, city school officials announced yesterday. The gains cut across all racial lines and include students with disabilities, those learning English and those identified as economically disadvantaged. Still, the latest results of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) revealed the continuation of another pattern - a significant achievement gap that has Asian and white students outperforming their African-American and Hispanic peers.
NEWS
December 16, 2004 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
So it turns out that American high school students do much worse in math than their peers in Hong Kong and South Korea. But the American kids think they're doing very well, thank you, while the Hong Kong and Korean students say they still have a long way to go. What's up with that? The discrepancy has many causes, to be sure, but at least part of the blame lies with our schools. We tell our kids that they're wonderful, over and over again, until they actually believe it. In other words, we lie. According to a 40-nation study of high-school math skills released last week by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Hong Kong and Korea rank first and third in the world, respectively, while the United States is 28th.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | by Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
The seventh-graders at Clara Barton Elementary School suffered through 13 different math teachers this school year because the School District did not want to spend the money to hire a full-timer, a teachers union leader charged yesterday. In a story in yesterday's Daily News, district officials said the procession of substitutes forced on the pupils could not be stemmed because of the provision in the teachers' labor contract that prohibits schools from hiring permanent replacements for teachers on sick leave.
NEWS
July 31, 2001
You make arrangements with Philadelphia Gas Works and they let you know what amount you must pay to get your bill down. You make payments every month, but instead of your bill going down, it goes up. Now you are paying much more. What type of arithmetic are they using? Someone needs to get on the ball before winter or we'll see some frozen people. Lula Jones, Philadelphia Nothing funny about Ira I applaud the efforts of the Maddux family and others in bringing Ira Einhorn to justice.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
L. Stanley Crane, chairman and chief executive officer of Conrail, has given a persuasive update on reasons why Congress should keep the railroad independent and not sell it to Norfolk Southern Corp. Testifying in Washington Wednesday before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, he presented the basic arithmetic to dramatize that the proposed sale actually would be a giveaway. Conrail has $939 million in cash and $360 million in overfunded pension assets for a total of about $1.3 billion.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
I am reading about graph theory and the pairwise relationships between objects. Very soon, there will be many pairwise relationships scheduled between basketball teams, and it is very important to understand these. Reading about graph theory is not fun - at least not for me - but it will be necessary to understand when it is time to decide if there is a graph that can properly predict whether the fourth representative from the Atlantic Coast Conference is superior in time, space, and three-point percentage to the automatic qualifier from the Sun Belt Conference.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan by the University of Pennsylvania to cut back on two of its branch libraries - one for engineering and the other for math, physics, and astronomy - has yielded an outcry from students and professors who say the books are critical to their studies and research. Both libraries are housed within the same campus buildings as their departments, and are heavily used by undergraduates and graduate students alike. Mathematics students, in particular, said many of the books and materials they need are not available electronically, and they must browse the library to find what they need.
SPORTS
February 1, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Zac MacMath played every minute of every game last season for the Union in goal, so he was among the many who didn't see it coming when the team selected University of Connecticut keeper Andre Blake with the first overall pick of the Major League Soccer SuperDraft. Immediately after the selection, team manager John Hackworth maintained that MacMath would still be the starter, but the move certainly brings more competition. "I think I was a little bit surprised, and obviously I understand why they picked him," said MacMath earlier this week during preseason workouts at YSC Sports in Wayne.
SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electrical and Technology's James Suber was well prepared for Thursday evening's Public League Division A matchup against Math, Civics and Sciences. In particular, the 6-foot-6, 200-pound senior forward was ready to square off with former Bartram teammate Mike Watkins, a 6-9, 220-pound junior and Penn State commit. "He's my brother, a close friend," Suber said. "Having played with him at Bartram, I kind of knew his game. I wanted to keep him off the block, make him use his left hand.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
NEW YORK - Julia Roberts has a line in August: Osage County , the all-star adaptation of the Tracy Letts ' Pulitzer Prize winner, that sums up the cheery worldview on display in this dysfunctional family free-for-all. "Thank God we can't tell the future," Roberts' character, the oldest and seemingly most together of the three Weston sisters, sighs. "We'd never get out of bed. " "That was really the one line of mine that just knocks you out," Roberts says. "Because it's so true, and it's so heartbreaking.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timothy Tam, 61, of Huntingdon Valley, an assistant professor of mathematics at Community College of Philadelphia, died Sunday, Nov. 24, at Holy Redeemer Hospital in Meadowbrook of injuries sustained in an automobile accident that day near his home. Born in Hong Kong, Dr. Tam received his doctorate in physics from Stony Brook University in 1982. He began teaching at CCP in 1991. Previously, he taught at Old Dominion University, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and the University of Western Ontario.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Melanie Burney and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey asked tougher questions in annual tests for elementary and middle school students, but the results remained nearly the same as last year - something state officials consider a positive outcome. The results from spring's standardized exams, released Wednesday by the state, are the first since questions in the majority of the grades tested for the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJASK) were aligned to the more rigorous Common Core Standard. Statewide, 66.7 percent of students in grades three through eight scored proficient in language arts, compared with 65.9 percent last year.
SPORTS
November 2, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State senior guard John Urschel has been named a National Football Foundation and Hall of Fame Scholar-Athlete, one of 16 football student-athletes chosen from across all NCAA and NAIA divisions, the NFF announced Thursday. Urschel, who was named an Academic All-American last year, receives an $18,000 scholarship for post-graduate studies with the award, and also is a finalist for the William V. Campbell Trophy presented to the nation's top college football scholar-athlete. The winner of the Campbell award, which carries an additional $25,000 post-graduate scholarship, will be announced Dec. 10 in New York where Urschel and the other scholar-athlete winners will be honored.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph V. Molinari served as an Air Force cargo pilot in Vietnam in the 1970s during the conflict there. Later, while in the Air Force Reserve, he was needed again. So Mr. Molinari interrupted his teaching and coaching career at Burlington City High School and flew cargo missions in the Middle East during the Persian Gulf War of 1990-91. On Sunday, Oct. 20, Mr. Molinari, 67, of Cherry Hill, died of cardiac arrest at St. Michael's Medical Center in Newark, N.J. Born in Newark, Mr. Molinari graduated from Kearny High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education at Seton Hall University.
NEWS
October 22, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - The students in Math 232, integral vector calculus at Pennsylvania State University, can watch their teacher perform on two stages this fall. One is their yellow-walled classroom in the Willard Building. The other is Beaver Stadium. The teacher is John C. Urschel, the 305-pound starting right guard for the Penn State football team, a first-team All-Big Ten selection, and an NFL prospect. Urschel finished his undergraduate math courses in three years, earning a perfect 4.0 grade-point average.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|