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NEWS
June 29, 2001
The United States recently donated $200 million to a United Nations consortium dedicated to arresting and reversing the course of the AIDS epidemic. Pathetic. Here we are, the richest, most powerful nation on earth, and we hand over a measly $200, when it's estimated that $7 to $10 billion will be needed annually. Let's do the math: 36 million people worldwide infected with AIDS, $200 million . . . that comes to about $5.56 per person. We should be ashamed of ourselves as a nation for offering so little help.
NEWS
January 3, 2005 | By Arthur Michelson
American middle school students don't much care that they're worse at math than their counterparts in Hong Kong and Finland. "I don't need it," my students say. "I'm gonna be a basketball star. " Or a beautician, or a car mechanic, or a singer. It's also hard to get much of a rise out of adults over the fact, released last year, that the United States ranked 28th out of 41 countries whose middle school students' math skills were tested by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The percentage of third, fifth and eighth graders in the Abington School District who needed remedial education in mathematics was higher last year than in the previous year, according to results of the state's basic-skills test. Reading in all three grades improved, as the percentage of Abington students who needed remedial help in that area was down. Although the percentage of third graders who needed remedial help in math increased only slightly, the amount of fifth graders who needed remedial education almost doubled from 8.6 percent in 1986-87 to 15.6 percent last year, according to the results of the Test of Essential Learning Skills (TELS)
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Lester, 9, is active and in good health. He rides a bike, swims at an indoor pool, and likes practicing his strokes in the ocean. He plays soccer at a local park, climbs the gym bars and goes on swings and slides. He also likes playing catch, going to church, and challenging others in a game of Scrabble or checkers. He is learning to play the flute. Though there is neglect and abuse in his background, Lester is a happy and well-adjusted boy. When a child in his foster home is feeling low, Lester will say, "Let's go draw" or offer to play catch.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Alonte, 12, is waiting to be adopted. His wish is to have an older brother who will show him how to do things. And he'd like a mother and father who would come to watch his team play basketball. Alonte receives therapy for the abuse and neglect in his background. He will continue to need counseling after adoption, and his entire family will be asked to be supportive and involved. He's in fifth grade and gets help with reading. He likes math, science, gym and recess best. One of his hobbies is drawing.
NEWS
December 16, 2004 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
So it turns out that American high school students do much worse in math than their peers in Hong Kong and South Korea. But the American kids think they're doing very well, thank you, while the Hong Kong and Korean students say they still have a long way to go. What's up with that? The discrepancy has many causes, to be sure, but at least part of the blame lies with our schools. We tell our kids that they're wonderful, over and over again, until they actually believe it. In other words, we lie. According to a 40-nation study of high-school math skills released last week by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Hong Kong and Korea rank first and third in the world, respectively, while the United States is 28th.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | by Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
The seventh-graders at Clara Barton Elementary School suffered through 13 different math teachers this school year because the School District did not want to spend the money to hire a full-timer, a teachers union leader charged yesterday. In a story in yesterday's Daily News, district officials said the procession of substitutes forced on the pupils could not be stemmed because of the provision in the teachers' labor contract that prohibits schools from hiring permanent replacements for teachers on sick leave.
NEWS
July 31, 2001
You make arrangements with Philadelphia Gas Works and they let you know what amount you must pay to get your bill down. You make payments every month, but instead of your bill going down, it goes up. Now you are paying much more. What type of arithmetic are they using? Someone needs to get on the ball before winter or we'll see some frozen people. Lula Jones, Philadelphia Nothing funny about Ira I applaud the efforts of the Maddux family and others in bringing Ira Einhorn to justice.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
L. Stanley Crane, chairman and chief executive officer of Conrail, has given a persuasive update on reasons why Congress should keep the railroad independent and not sell it to Norfolk Southern Corp. Testifying in Washington Wednesday before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, he presented the basic arithmetic to dramatize that the proposed sale actually would be a giveaway. Conrail has $939 million in cash and $360 million in overfunded pension assets for a total of about $1.3 billion.
NEWS
July 1, 2008 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
FOR A SIXTH straight year under state control, Philadelphia School District students posted impressive gains on the state's reading and math exams, city school officials announced yesterday. The gains cut across all racial lines and include students with disabilities, those learning English and those identified as economically disadvantaged. Still, the latest results of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) revealed the continuation of another pattern - a significant achievement gap that has Asian and white students outperforming their African-American and Hispanic peers.
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NEWS
January 15, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
No one disputes that John Wister Elementary, where few students learn to read or do math on grade level, must improve. The thorny question is: How best to elevate performance at the Germantown K-5, part of the Philadelphia School District? Earlier this school year, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. recommended that Wister, along with two other district schools, be given to charter companies in September. But this week, Hite reversed course, saying that on the basis of progress evidenced in new district data, Wister was eligible for an in-house turnaround instead of the more radical overhaul.
SPORTS
December 13, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Union have officially cut ties with goalkeeper Zach MacMath, trading him to the Colorado Rapids for a natural second-round selection in the 2017 Major League Soccer SuperDraft. (A natural pick is the highest selection in that round if the team has multiple draft choices). MacMath, 24, was the Union's first-round draft choice, selected fifth overall, in 2011. In four seasons with the Union, he started 102 games and had a record of 34-39-29. Before last season he was loaned to Colorado, where he played in just three MLS games and two U.S. Open Cup matches.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I already know what it's like to be homeless, hungry, and abused," said Carmen Williams, 22, weeping Wednesday as she spoke at a breakfast meeting of educators and business people at Community College of Philadelphia. Now Williams, a single mother and college student, is learning what it's like to be a success, en route to a promotion to shift manager at Starbucks. "Take your time, honey, take your time," murmured someone in the group, as an academic meeting suddenly turned achingly personal.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Scores on a new standardized test confirm an old problem for New Jersey high school students: math. Students in grades four through 11 in about 10 states, including New Jersey, took the controversial Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Career exams last spring. The New Jersey Department of Education on Tuesday released state-level results showing the percentage of students who met expectations in math and language arts. The majority of New Jersey students in all grades failed to meet expectations.
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public schools are a perpetual worry for Philadelphia, and scant attention is often paid to another weighty educational problem: adults who struggle to read. But nearly half of all adults in the city - more than half a million men and women - lack the basic skills necessary to qualify for postsecondary training or hold jobs that permit them to support a family. Many function below eighth-grade levels. The Mayor's Commission on Literacy is making inroads. Its work is attracting national attention: praise from the U.S. Department of Education, and designation as a model site from Digital Promise, a nonprofit established by act of Congress in 2008 to use technology to improve education for all Americans.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Madison Russ, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf vetoed the Republican-backed $30.1 billion budget in its entirety Tuesday night, a move that leaves Pennsylvania without a spending plan and sets the stage for a partial government shutdown. A visibly frustrated Wolf told reporters shortly after 9 that the spending plan the Republican-controlled legislature sent him was riddled with "gimmicks," as well as "smoke and mirrors, and a lot of kicking the can down the road. " He said it failed to adequately fund public education or provide property-tax relief to homeowners, and contended it would worsen the state's finances.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert Eugene Filano, 89, of West Chester, a decorated World War II veteran and later a mathematics professor at West Chester University, died Monday, May 18, of respiratory failure at Barclay Friends in West Chester. Born in Penfield, Pa., he was the son of Italian immigrants James E. and Rosy Ulizio Filano. He graduated in 1943 from Jay Township High School and went into the Army Air Corps, completing 33 combat missions against the Japanese mainland as a B-29 bombardier and radar navigator.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
IT LOOKS AS IF today's election might be the one, at least the rare one, in which values outweigh race or ethnicity. Generally, but not always, we vote for people who look like us. It is racial, but not racist. We gravitate toward those who are like us because we feel they will understand us. It is tribal, something buried in the deep recesses of our reptilian brains. Not everyone does that, of course. In recent decades, liberal whites have been more open to voting across the color line than Philly blacks.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
If the contest for mayor were between a candidate who supports schools and one who doesn't, it wouldn't be much of a campaign. Declaring education important and vowing to fund it accordingly is easy. How to pay for it is the hard question - one the mayoral candidates, as their answers on today's op-ed page show, aren't especially eager to answer. Like most core government services, public education has to be funded on a recurring basis. That means one-time windfalls like Jim Kenney's tax-lien sale and several candidates' welcome promises to collect back taxes won't get the School District that far. Other than savaging Mayor Nutter's proposed 9 percent property tax hike, the candidates are short on concrete plans for the broad-based taxes that could significantly boost long-term school funding.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
HAMBURG, Pa. - Math, Civics, and Sciences Charter made short work of Millersburg on Friday in a PIAA Class A quarterfinal at Hamburg High. The Mighty Elephants steamrolled the District 3 Indians, 92-60. Keith Griffin led the charge with 30 points. Griffin scored the game's first nine points during a first-quarter spurt that ended with MC&S ahead, 19-0, four minutes into the game. "We just started off aggressively," he said. "Easy layups, back doors, and everybody was knocking down shots.
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