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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
The United States recently donated $200 million to a United Nations consortium dedicated to arresting and reversing the course of the AIDS epidemic. Pathetic. Here we are, the richest, most powerful nation on earth, and we hand over a measly $200, when it's estimated that $7 to $10 billion will be needed annually. Let's do the math: 36 million people worldwide infected with AIDS, $200 million . . . that comes to about $5.56 per person. We should be ashamed of ourselves as a nation for offering so little help.
NEWS
January 3, 2005 | By Arthur Michelson
American middle school students don't much care that they're worse at math than their counterparts in Hong Kong and Finland. "I don't need it," my students say. "I'm gonna be a basketball star. " Or a beautician, or a car mechanic, or a singer. It's also hard to get much of a rise out of adults over the fact, released last year, that the United States ranked 28th out of 41 countries whose middle school students' math skills were tested by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The percentage of third, fifth and eighth graders in the Abington School District who needed remedial education in mathematics was higher last year than in the previous year, according to results of the state's basic-skills test. Reading in all three grades improved, as the percentage of Abington students who needed remedial help in that area was down. Although the percentage of third graders who needed remedial help in math increased only slightly, the amount of fifth graders who needed remedial education almost doubled from 8.6 percent in 1986-87 to 15.6 percent last year, according to the results of the Test of Essential Learning Skills (TELS)
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Lester, 9, is active and in good health. He rides a bike, swims at an indoor pool, and likes practicing his strokes in the ocean. He plays soccer at a local park, climbs the gym bars and goes on swings and slides. He also likes playing catch, going to church, and challenging others in a game of Scrabble or checkers. He is learning to play the flute. Though there is neglect and abuse in his background, Lester is a happy and well-adjusted boy. When a child in his foster home is feeling low, Lester will say, "Let's go draw" or offer to play catch.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Alonte, 12, is waiting to be adopted. His wish is to have an older brother who will show him how to do things. And he'd like a mother and father who would come to watch his team play basketball. Alonte receives therapy for the abuse and neglect in his background. He will continue to need counseling after adoption, and his entire family will be asked to be supportive and involved. He's in fifth grade and gets help with reading. He likes math, science, gym and recess best. One of his hobbies is drawing.
NEWS
December 16, 2004 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
So it turns out that American high school students do much worse in math than their peers in Hong Kong and South Korea. But the American kids think they're doing very well, thank you, while the Hong Kong and Korean students say they still have a long way to go. What's up with that? The discrepancy has many causes, to be sure, but at least part of the blame lies with our schools. We tell our kids that they're wonderful, over and over again, until they actually believe it. In other words, we lie. According to a 40-nation study of high-school math skills released last week by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Hong Kong and Korea rank first and third in the world, respectively, while the United States is 28th.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | by Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
The seventh-graders at Clara Barton Elementary School suffered through 13 different math teachers this school year because the School District did not want to spend the money to hire a full-timer, a teachers union leader charged yesterday. In a story in yesterday's Daily News, district officials said the procession of substitutes forced on the pupils could not be stemmed because of the provision in the teachers' labor contract that prohibits schools from hiring permanent replacements for teachers on sick leave.
NEWS
July 31, 2001
You make arrangements with Philadelphia Gas Works and they let you know what amount you must pay to get your bill down. You make payments every month, but instead of your bill going down, it goes up. Now you are paying much more. What type of arithmetic are they using? Someone needs to get on the ball before winter or we'll see some frozen people. Lula Jones, Philadelphia Nothing funny about Ira I applaud the efforts of the Maddux family and others in bringing Ira Einhorn to justice.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
L. Stanley Crane, chairman and chief executive officer of Conrail, has given a persuasive update on reasons why Congress should keep the railroad independent and not sell it to Norfolk Southern Corp. Testifying in Washington Wednesday before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, he presented the basic arithmetic to dramatize that the proposed sale actually would be a giveaway. Conrail has $939 million in cash and $360 million in overfunded pension assets for a total of about $1.3 billion.
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SPORTS
May 29, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
Colorado goalkeeper Zac MacMath concedes that this won't be any normal game when the Rapids host the Union in Saturday's Major League Soccer matchup. But he insists his approach will be the same. MacMath played for the Union for four seasons and was the starter for most of three before being loaned to Colorado last year. After last season, Colorado acquired his rights from the Union for a natural second-round pick in the 2017 MLS SuperDraft. Now, Saturday will be the first time he will be facing his former team when the Union (5-3-4)
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
As a lawyer, Dennis Weldon has to make sense of tortuous legal papers. But a year ago, the Plumstead Township resident opened a nine-page document that left him flummoxed. It was his child's report card from Gayman Elementary School in the Central Bucks School District. Gone was the traditional A-B-C-D-F report from the teacher. Instead, parents were sent to their computers to click open a nine-page digital document with row after row of learning standards and success indicators for specific reading or math skills.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Darren Glass is associate professor of mathematics at Gettysburg College I recently saw the film The Man Who Knew Infinity , which was released in many American cities this weekend, and was struck by the beautiful telling of an inspirational story. The film, which stars Jeremy Irons and Dev Patel, is a biography of the mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan, who was born in India at the end of the 19th century. Though he flunked out of college twice, Ramanujan did mathematical research independently while working as a clerk in an accountant's office.
SPORTS
March 17, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, Staff Writer
With all eyes on him, Kwahzere Ransom momentarily shielded his. The Math, Civics and Sciences sophomore stood at the foul line with about 30 seconds left in Tuesday night's PIAA Class A state semifinal at Philadelphia University and pulled the top of his jersey over his face. Before hitting a dramatic game-winning three-pointer to beat Constitution, 79-78, in overtime, Ransom had missed three consecutive free throws that could have helped the Mighty Elephants secure the victory.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, STAFF WRITER
There's a house on Cumberland Street in North Philadelphia with a white flag fluttering outside. The flag is not - despite a decadelong siege by weeds and blight, and daily bombardments of refuse - a symbol of surrender. It bears the words will power . It means the Penny Candy Store is open. The store in question is technically the home of Nandi and Khalid Muhammad. Their living room's been overtaken by a large table heavy with bins of candy and a commercial freezer full of ice cream.
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
I'm a genius. Donald Trump said so. It must be true. His observation came the night of his impressive victory in South Carolina, after I noted on CNN that the total vote garnered by Marco Rubio (22.5 percent), Jeb Bush (7.8), and John Kasich (7.6) bested his total (37.9 vs. 32.5). My observation that a coalescing of the establishment vote could topple Trump was also something I'd tweeted: (Marco + Kasich + Jeb = more than Trump. But it needs to happen soon or it will be too late.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
Warren Buffett says candidates miss the mark on the economy. A3. Currents "Establishment:" Has it lost its meaning? C1. Past fired-up campaigns didn't always endure. C1. Is the math on Trump's side? Smerconish, C5.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
No one disputes that John Wister Elementary, where few students learn to read or do math on grade level, must improve. The thorny question is: How best to elevate performance at the Germantown K-5, part of the Philadelphia School District? Earlier this school year, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. recommended that Wister, along with two other district schools, be given to charter companies in September. But this week, Hite reversed course, saying that on the basis of progress evidenced in new district data, Wister was eligible for an in-house turnaround instead of the more radical overhaul.
SPORTS
December 13, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Union have officially cut ties with goalkeeper Zach MacMath, trading him to the Colorado Rapids for a natural second-round selection in the 2017 Major League Soccer SuperDraft. (A natural pick is the highest selection in that round if the team has multiple draft choices). MacMath, 24, was the Union's first-round draft choice, selected fifth overall, in 2011. In four seasons with the Union, he started 102 games and had a record of 34-39-29. Before last season he was loaned to Colorado, where he played in just three MLS games and two U.S. Open Cup matches.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I already know what it's like to be homeless, hungry, and abused," said Carmen Williams, 22, weeping Wednesday as she spoke at a breakfast meeting of educators and business people at Community College of Philadelphia. Now Williams, a single mother and college student, is learning what it's like to be a success, en route to a promotion to shift manager at Starbucks. "Take your time, honey, take your time," murmured someone in the group, as an academic meeting suddenly turned achingly personal.
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